Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3533 records – page 1 of 354.

The public health implications of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76422
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2004 Nov;59(3):275-291
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Ross, G
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2004 Nov;59(3):275-291
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
PCBs
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were widely used in various industrial applications. Research confirmed that some PCB congeners degrade slowly in the environment and can build up in the food chain. Poisoning episodes in Asia were initially attributed to PCB-contaminated oil, although subsequent analysis suggested that thermal degradation products of PCBs were responsible for the observed toxicity. Commercial production of PCBs in the United States was banned in 1979. Several agencies have categorized PCBs as animal carcinogens; however, studies of workers exposed to high doses of PCBs have not demonstrated an increased cancer risk. Health effects attributable to PCBs include skin and eye irritation. There is no reliable evidence that PCBs in the environment result in either "endocrine disruption" or intellectual deterioration in children exposed in utero. Because PCB exposures from environmental sources do not pose a significant health risk, little benefit to public health can result from continued remediation of PCB sources.
Less detail

Occurrence of chemical exposure in small industry in southern Finland, 1976.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242454
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1983;27(3):283-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
T. Vihma
M. Nurminen
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1983;27(3):283-9
Date
1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Humans
Industry
PubMed ID
6638762 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nord Med. 1971 Jun 10;85(23):732
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1971
Author
O. Midttun
Source
Nord Med. 1971 Jun 10;85(23):732
Date
Jun-10-1971
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
5089027 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Inventorization of all roentgen activities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247585
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 Jan 11;3(1):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-11-1979
Author
C. Olofsson
Source
Vardfacket. 1979 Jan 11;3(1):17
Date
Jan-11-1979
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Radiation Protection
Sweden
PubMed ID
253514 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nordtox-92. 2nd Nordic Toxicology Congress. Humans in the toxic environment. Mariehamn, Aland Islands, Finland, May 6-10, 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223927
Source
Pharmacol Toxicol. 1992 May;70(5 Pt 2):1-44
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-1992
Source
Pharmacol Toxicol. 1992 May;70(5 Pt 2):1-44
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Humans
Toxicology
PubMed ID
1350674 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cold physiology and cold injuries. Proceedings of the Nordic Conference on Cold. Tromso, Norway, January 30 - February 2, 1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227649
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1991;50 Suppl 6:5-160
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1991
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1991;50 Suppl 6:5-160
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cold Temperature
Environmental Exposure
Humans
PubMed ID
1687434 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Feb 12;66(7):656-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-1969
Author
J O Ullén
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Feb 12;66(7):656-7
Date
Feb-12-1969
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
5768957 View in PubMed
Less detail

ELF-magnetic flux densities measured in a city environment in summer and winter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161556
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2008 Jan;29(1):20-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Aksel Straume
Anders Johnsson
Gunnhild Oftedal
Author Affiliation
Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2008 Jan;29(1):20-8
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electromagnetic fields
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Norway
Seasons
Abstract
Epidemiological studies have indicated a connection between extremely low frequency magnetic flux densities above 0.4 microT (time weighted average) and childhood leukemia risks. This conclusion is based mainly on indoor exposure measurements. We therefore regarded it important to map outdoor magnetic flux densities in public areas in Trondheim, Norway. Because of seasonal power consumption variations, the fields were measured during both summer and winter. Magnetic flux density was mapped 1.0 m above the ground along 17 km of pavements in downtown Trondheim. The spectrum was measured at some spots and the magnetic flux density emanated mainly from the power frequency of 50 Hz. In summer less than 4% of the streets showed values exceeding 0.4 microT, increasing to 29% and 34% on cold and on snowy winter days, respectively. The average levels were 0.13 microT (summer), 0.85 microT (winter, cold), and 0.90 microT (winter, snow), with the highest recorded value of 37 microT. High spot measurements were usually encountered above underground transformer substations. In winter electric heating of pavements also gave rise to relatively high flux densities. There was no indication that the ICNIRP basic restriction was exceeded. It would be of interest to map the flux density situation in other cities and towns with a cold climate.
PubMed ID
17786926 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposures of children in Canada to 60-Hz magnetic and electric fields.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200715
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Aug;25(4):368-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
J E Deadman
B G Armstrong
M L McBride
R. Gallagher
G. Thériault
Author Affiliation
Joint Department of Epidemiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. jdeadm@ibm.net
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Aug;25(4):368-75
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Electromagnetic fields
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Abstract
This study sought to characterize personal exposures of Canadian children to 60-Hz magnetic and electric fields and explain the variability.
Altogether 382 Canadian children up to 15 years of age wore meters recording 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields over 2 days. Meter location was noted. Thereafter, meters measured fields in the center of the children's bedrooms for 24 hours. Personal exposures were calculated for home, school or day care, outside the home, bedroom at night, and all categories combined (total).
The arithmetic mean (AM) was 0.121 microT [geometric mean (GM): 0.085 microT), range 0.01-0.8 microT] for total magnetic fields. Fifteen percent of the total exposures exceeded 0.2 microT. The AM of the total electric fields was 14.4 (GM 12.3, range 0.82-64.7) V/m. By location category, the highest and lowest magnetic fields occurred at home during the day (0.142 microT) and during the night (0.112 microT), respectively. Measurements during sleep provided the highest correlation with total magnetic field exposure. Province of measurement explained 14.7% of the variation in the logarithms of total magnetic fields, and season accounted for an additional 1.5%.
This study has identified differences in children's magnetic field exposures between provinces. Measurements at night provided the best surrogate for predicting total magnetic field exposure, followed by at-home exposure and 24-hour bedroom measurements. Electrical heating and air conditioning, wiring type, and type of housing appear to be promising indicators of magnetic field levels.
PubMed ID
10505663 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The presence of mercury in the urine of dentists in the southwestern portion of Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232639
Source
Suom Hammaslaakarilehti. 1988 Aug 15;35(14):774-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-1988
Author
T. Lehto
P. Alanen
T. Rönnemaa
H. Helenius
V. Kallio
Source
Suom Hammaslaakarilehti. 1988 Aug 15;35(14):774-81
Date
Aug-15-1988
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentists
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Humans
Mercury - urine
PubMed ID
3270137 View in PubMed
Less detail

3533 records – page 1 of 354.