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The aesthetic dimension in hospitals--an investigation into strategic plans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81540
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Caspari Synnøve
Eriksson Katie
Nåden Dagfinn
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. Synnove.Caspari@su.hio.no
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Environment Design - standards
Esthetics
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Guidelines
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction - standards
Hospitals, General - organization & administration
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Noise - prevention & control
Norway
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Patients' Rooms - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Plants
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: The underlying assumption was that the aesthetics of the hospital surroundings are often neglected. AIMS: This article is the first part of a larger study into the aesthetics of general hospitals. The aim of the study is to throw light on the influence of aesthetics on the health and well-being of patients and the professional personnel, and to examine how aesthetic considerations are dealt with. We present a survey of how the aesthetic dimension is planned and it is considered important in the strategic plans of Norwegian general hospitals. METHODS: Data were sampled by analyzing the strategic plans of somatic hospitals. Sixty-four of 86 hospitals responded (74%). Concepts were categorized in a matrix of 11 main categories, each with subcategories. The method was quantitative, in that the analyzed material was amenable to counting. RESULTS: Very few concrete guidelines or directions for the aesthetic dimension have been included in written documents. This indicates that the aesthetic area is a neglected field in the directions for the daily management of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The research available today on the contribution of environmental aesthetics to health, rehabilitation, and well-being suggests that it is important to have concrete guidelines recorded in strategic plans. This field concerns the maintenance of high quality in the caring professions.
PubMed ID
16824528 View in PubMed
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Designing a workplace return-to-work program for occupational low back pain: an intervention mapping approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150444
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009;10:65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Carlo Ammendolia
David Cassidy
Ivan Steensta
Sophie Soklaridis
Eleanor Boyle
Stephanie Eng
Hamer Howard
Bains Bhupinder
Pierre Côté
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research Expertise in Improved Disability Outcomes, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. cammendo@uhnresearch.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2009;10:65
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Behavior Therapy - methods
Environment Design - standards
Evidence-Based Practice - methods
Expert Testimony
Feedback
Focus Groups - methods
Human Engineering - methods
Humans
Intervention Studies
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Ontario - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Workplace - standards
Abstract
Despite over 2 decades of research, the ability to prevent work-related low back pain (LBP) and disability remains elusive. Recent research suggests that interventions that are focused at the workplace and incorporate the principals of participatory ergonomics and return-to-work (RTW) coordination can improve RTW and reduce disability following a work-related back injury. Workplace interventions or programs to improve RTW are difficult to design and implement given the various individuals and environments involved, each with their own unique circumstances. Intervention mapping provides a framework for designing and implementing complex interventions or programs. The objective of this study is to design a best evidence RTW program for occupational LBP tailored to the Ontario setting using an intervention mapping approach.
We used a qualitative synthesis based on the intervention mapping methodology. Best evidence from systematic reviews, practice guidelines and key articles on the prognosis and management of LBP and improving RTW was combined with theoretical models for managing LBP and changing behaviour. This was then systematically operationalized into a RTW program using consensus among experts and stakeholders. The RTW Program was further refined following feedback from nine focus groups with various stakeholders.
A detailed five step RTW program was developed. The key features of the program include; having trained personnel coordinate the RTW process, identifying and ranking barriers and solutions to RTW from the perspective of all important stakeholders, mediating practical solutions at the workplace and, empowering the injured worker in RTW decision-making.
Intervention mapping provided a useful framework to develop a comprehensive RTW program tailored to the Ontario setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19508728 View in PubMed
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Development of workplace environment standards in foreign countries. Pt. 2.--concepts of higher nervous function in the USSR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250952
Source
J Occup Med. 1976 Jul;18(7):477-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1976

Effect of environmental setting on mobility methods of children with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186733
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2003 Feb;45(2):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Robert J Palisano
Beth L Tieman
Stephen D Walter
Doreen J Bartlett
Peter L Rosenbaum
Diane Russell
Steven E Hanna
Author Affiliation
Drexel University, Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences, Philadelphia, PA 19102-1192, USA. robert.j.palisano@drexel.edu
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2003 Feb;45(2):113-20
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Architectural Accessibility
Cerebral Palsy - classification - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Environment Design - standards
Female
Housing
Humans
Locomotion
Logistic Models
Male
Motor Skills
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Questionnaires
Schools
Severity of Illness Index
Walking
Wheelchairs
Abstract
The aim of this study was to: (1) describe the usual mobility methods of children with cerebral palsy (CP) at home, school, and outdoors or in the community and (2) examine whether children with CP are more dependent on adult assistance for mobility in certain settings. The participants were a stratified random sample of 636 children with CP (355 males and 281 females; 2 to 12 years of age, mean 6.8 years SD 2.7), receiving rehabilitation services in Ontario, Canada. Children were grouped by age and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level. Among the five levels of the GMFCS, there were 185 children classified at level I, 81 children at level II, 113 children at level III, 132 children at level IV, and 125 children at level V. Information on children's usual mobility was obtained by parent report. The results of logistic regression indicated that compared with the school setting, children were more dependent on adult assistance for mobility when outdoors/in the community and less dependent at home. The majority of children aged from 4 to 12 years at levels III to V used wheelchair mobility at school and outdoors or in the community, however, only a small percentage self-propelled their wheelchair or used powered mobility. Of the children aged 4 to 12 years at level V, 39% were carried at home. The findings suggest that environmental setting is an important consideration for assessment and intervention to improve mobility of children with CP. For children who do not walk, attention should be given to the needs of caregivers and factors that are important for successful powered mobility.
PubMed ID
12578237 View in PubMed
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Effect of trail design and grooming on the incidence of injuries at alpine ski areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30322
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2004 Jun;38(3):264-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
K A Bergstrøm
A. Ekeland
Author Affiliation
Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Voss, Norway. kjell.arne.bergstrom@c2i.net
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2004 Jun;38(3):264-8
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Environment Design - standards
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Skiing - injuries
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To identify the conditions at certain sites on slopes known as black spots for injury. METHOD: In the Hafjell and Voss alpine ski areas in Norway, 1410 skiing injuries were recorded from December 1990 through the 1996 season. In Hafjell, 183 of these injuries were plotted on an area map during the two first seasons. Similarly, in Voss, 214 injuries were plotted on an area map for two seasons. During the last three seasons in Hafjell, 835 ski injuries were related to 6712 snow grooming hours and 6,829,084 lift journeys. RESULTS: The mean injury rate was 2.2 injuries per 1000 skier days, and the mean injury severity score (ISS) was 3.1. Accumulations of injuries at three sites (black spots) were recorded on the Hafjell area map. These injuries represented 40% of all injuries in the alpine area (p0.05). Grooming of the slopes was rated poor for the 49% of injuries that occurred at the sites of injury concentration and significantly different (27%) from injuries that occurred at random in Hafjell. The corresponding values in Voss were 50% and 25% respectively. Grooming hours appeared to be inversely proportional to the number of injuries: R = -0.99 (p
PubMed ID
15155423 View in PubMed
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How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282485
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:229-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Leif D Houck
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:229-39
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architecture as Topic - education
Competitive Behavior
Disabled Persons
Environment Design - standards
Judgment
Norway
Abstract
This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details.
PubMed ID
27534308 View in PubMed
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Inclusive Parks across Ages: Multifunction and Urban Open Space Management for Children, Adolescents, and the Elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303899
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 12 14; 17(24):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-14-2020
Author
Elin P Sundevall
Märit Jansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Landscape Architecture, Planning and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 66, 230 53 Alnarp, Sweden.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 12 14; 17(24):
Date
12-14-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Child
Environment Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Parks, Recreational - statistics & numerical data
Public Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Walking
Abstract
In urban areas where increased density has caused loss of urban open space (UOS), there is a need for high-quality parks that are inclusive and fit for multiple user groups. To make parks more inclusive, UOS management may need to consider multifunction and the perspectives of various age groups in future development and maintenance activities. Walking interviews were conducted in a park in central Landskrona, Sweden, with children, adolescents, and elderly users, and also with the head park manager of the city. The results revealed different perspectives among the three age groups of users concerning affordances and UOS management. The manager described user-oriented management to support multifunction and inclusion, including user participation. All user groups studied showed an appreciation of liveliness, contact with nature, social places for their own age group, clean and safe parks, and a variety of different atmospheres and activities in the park. Social multifunction can be developed in programmed or non-programmed ways, but some functions interfere with each other. UOS managers can develop parks to suit different age groups, promote user participation within management, and develop social multifunction to create inclusive parks for various age groups.
PubMed ID
33327579 View in PubMed
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Mapping Norway - A Method to Register and Survey the Status of Accessibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291058
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016; 229:673-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Kathrin Bögelsack
Sven Michaelis
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Mapping Authority, Norway.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016; 229:673-9
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility
Databases, Factual
Environment Design - standards
Mobile Applications
Norway
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Norwegian mapping authority has developed an APP and a standard method for mapping accessibility for people with limited or no walking abilities, the blind and the partially sighted in urban and recreational areas. We choose an object-orientated approach where points, lines and polygons represents objects in the environment. All data are stored in a geospatial database, so they can be presented as web map and analysed using GIS software. To this day, more than 160 municipalities are mapped using that method. The aim of this project is to establish a national standard for mapping and to provide a geodatabase that shows the status of accessibility throughout Norway. The data provide a useful tool for national statistics, local planning authorities and private users. First results show that accessibility is low and Norway still faces many challenges to meet the government's goals for Universal Design.
PubMed ID
27534365 View in PubMed
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A nordic charter for universal design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107939
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Feb;42(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Evastina Björk
Author Affiliation
NHV - Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden, and Gjøvik University College, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Feb;42(1):1-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Disabled Persons
Environment Design - standards
Humans
Needs Assessment
Public Facilities - standards
Scandinavia
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to present the result of a pioneer project; A Nordic Charter for Universal Design, which was initiated by the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs in 2011. The purpose of the Charter was to present rationales that stated prerequisites for successful investment in Universal Design, and to establish a platform for further research and good practice. It was also meant to contribute to spreading of information and knowledge about the importance of guidance by the concept of Universal Design of initiatives with effects on the public arena.
A Nordic group of researchers and professionals in the field ended up after 8 months of work with a written document: "A Nordic Charter for Universal Design", which was presented at the International Conference in Universal Design in Oslo, Norway (UD 2012).
A Nordic Charter for Universal Design.
Persons with disabilities often experience the public arenas environments, products and services as poorly-designed to fit their abilities and/or their needs. Together with the demographic changes in the Nordic societies with an increasing number of elderly people, it needs initiatives to improve independence, accessibility and participation in society. A strategy which aims to make design and composition of different environments, products, communication, information technology and services accessible, usable and understandable to as many as possible is Universal Design.
PubMed ID
23960156 View in PubMed
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Perceived green qualities were associated with neighborhood satisfaction, physical activity, and general health: results from a cross-sectional study in suburban and rural Scania, southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121643
Source
Health Place. 2012 Nov;18(6):1374-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Kim de Jong
Maria Albin
Erik Skärbäck
Patrik Grahn
Jonas Björk
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. kim.de_jong@med.lu.se
Source
Health Place. 2012 Nov;18(6):1374-80
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Environment Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Personal Satisfaction
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Suburban Population - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In this study using cross-sectional survey data from suburban and rural Scania, Sweden (N=24,847), we assessed how the recently validated index score of area-aggregated perceived green neighborhood qualities (Scania Green Score; SGS), and the five distinct qualities within this index were associated with three self-reported indicators of well-being: neighborhood satisfaction, physical activity and general health. Effect sizes were compared with objective (GIS-based) assessments of the same five qualities. Area-aggregated SGS was positively associated with neighborhood satisfaction, physical activity and general health. The association with general health was mediated by physical activity and neighborhood satisfaction. Three perceived qualities had salutogenic potential: historical remains (culture), silence such that sounds of nature can be heard (serene) and species richness (lush). Spacious and wild were not appreciated. Some independent positive effects of the GIS-based index were noted, but could not be consistently attributed to specific qualities. Perceived qualities within green areas, not merely quantity, are related to aspects of well-being in suburban and rural areas.
PubMed ID
22889998 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.