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60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
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1992 Genetics Society of Canada Award of Excellence Lecture: Genes, science, and society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220545
Source
Genome. 1993 Aug;36(4):631-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
C R Scriver
Author Affiliation
DeBelle Laboratory, McGill University-Montreal Children's Hospital Research Institute, QC, Canada.
Source
Genome. 1993 Aug;36(4):631-40
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors - genetics - history
Animals
Awards and Prizes
Canada
Child
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Genetics - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Mice
Rickets - genetics - history
Social Environment
Societies, Scientific
PubMed ID
8405982 View in PubMed
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[About 10 percent are able to work full-time nights]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41729
Source
Vardfacket. 1978 Feb 16;2(3):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-1978

Abuse and neglect of American Indian children: findings from a survey of federal providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5117
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J M Piasecki
S M Manson
M P Biernoff
A B Hiat
S S Taylor
D W Bechtold
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - epidemiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Child abuse and neglect is of growing concern in many American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The present paper represents one attempt to add to the existing, albeit sparse, knowledge base concerning the abuse and neglect of American Indian children. It reports the results of a survey of federal human service providers in which the subject of child abuse and neglect in Indian communities figured prominently. The study took place at several locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Data were obtained using the key-informant method from 55 federal service providers who identified 1,155 children, from birth to 21 years for inclusion in the survey. Children were included if they were currently in mental health treatment, if they were in need of mental health treatment, or if they were known to have been abused or neglected. Particular emphasis was given in the data collection to abuse- and neglect-related factors such as living arrangements, familial disruption, psychiatric symptoms, substance abuse, and school adjustment. The patterns evident in this sample closely resemble those trends identified among abused and/or neglected children in the general population. Sixty-seven percent of the sample was described as neglected or abused. The presence of abuse and/or neglect was strongly related to severe levels of chaos in the family. Children who were described as both abused and neglected had more psychiatric symptoms, greater frequency of having run away or been expelled, and greater frequency of drug use.
PubMed ID
2490293 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of an emotional and behavioural screening tool for children in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in urban NSW.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140192
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Anna Williamson
Sally Redman
Mark Dadds
John Daniels
Catherine D'Este
Beverley Raphael
Sandra Eades
Tracey Skinner
Author Affiliation
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. anna.williamson@saxinstitute.org.au
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child Welfare
Community Health Services
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental health
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and face validity of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHOs) located in the greater Sydney region.
A qualitative study was conducted in three ACCHOs located within the greater Sydney region in 2008-2009. A semi-structured approach was used in focus groups and small group interviews (n = 47) to elicit participants' views on the appropriateness of the SDQ and any additional issues of importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health.
The SDQ was found to cover many important aspects of Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health, however, the wording of some questions was considered ambiguous and some critical issues are not explored. The peer relationships subscale did not appear to fit well with Aboriginal concepts of the relative importance of different interpersonal relationships.
Overall the SDQ was acceptable in ACCHOs in Sydney; however, changes to the wording of some questions and the response scale may be indicated to improve cultural appropriateness and clarity. A further set of issues which are not covered by any commonly used screening tools but are of critical importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health should also be considered by clinicians.
PubMed ID
20932203 View in PubMed
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Achievement and mental ability of physically late and early maturing schoolchildren related to their social background.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40354
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1982 Oct;23(4):407-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1982
Author
G. Westin-Lindgren
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1982 Oct;23(4):407-20
Date
Oct-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Child
Child Development
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Psychological Tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The results from achievement and mental ability testing in grades 3, 5, and 6 (ages 10, 12 and 13) of about 150 Swedish urban schoolchildren (boys and girls) were analysed according to the children's physical maturity (defined by late and early peak height velocity ages) and social background (defined by father's occupation). Social background played the main role in performance on both the achievement and most of the mental ability tests. Early maturers were, in general, superior to late maturers on the mental ability tests in grade 5. On verbally loaded tests and interaction between physical maturity and social background was found--early maturers scored higher than late maturers in the "lowest" social group, while a slight trend or no difference between early and late maturers was noticed for the 'upper' social groups.
PubMed ID
7130299 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and sociomedical risk factors among unselected children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3493
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Date
Jun-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the sociomedical risk factors associated with episodes of acute otitis media (AOM), recurrent AOM (rAOM), and chronic otitis media (COM) in Greenlandic children and especially to point out children at high risk of rAOM (defined as > 5 AOM episodes since birth) and COM which are prevalent among Inuit children all over the Arctic. METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and included 740 unselected children, 3, 4, 5, and 8-years-old, living in two major Greenlandic towns, Nuuk and Sisimiut. All children were otologically examined and the parents answered a questionnaire containing sociomedical variables including ethnicity, family history of OM, housing, insulation, crowding, daycare, passive cigarette smoking, breast feeding, type of diet, allergy, and chronic diseases. Historical data were cross-checked in medical records which also formed the basis for the drop-out analyses. Statistical analyses included frequency tests, calculation of odds ratio (OR), and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The attendance rate was 86%. Former episode of AOM was reported by 2/3 of the children, rAOM by 20%, and COM by 9%. The following variables were found significantly more often in children with AOM by simple frequency testing: Parental (OR = 1.83), sibling (OR = 1.62), and parental plus sibling (OR = 2.56) history of OM, crowding (OR = 5.55), long period of exclusive breast feeding ( > 4 months) (OR = 2.47), and recent acute disease (P = 0.034). The following variables were found significantly more often in children with rAOM or COM by simple frequency testing: Parental history of OM (OR = 1.60; OR = 2.11, respectively) and no recall of breast feeding (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively). Also, COM was found significantly more often in children with two Greenlandic parents (OR = 3.07). A multiple logistic regression test denoted only parental history of OM (OR = 1.82) and long period of exclusive breast feeding (OR = 1.14) as significant predictors of AOM. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the risk factors usually associated with AOM could not be confirmed as risk factors in this survey. Parental history of OM and long period of exclusive breast feeding were the strongest factors associated with AOM in Greenlandic children and ethnicity was associated with COM. However, the study confirms that AOM is a multifactorial disease determined by a number of genetic and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10428404 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation of school girls to natural and socio-hygienic factors in the Republic of Altai].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185915
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jan-Feb;(1):50-2
Publication Type
Article

Adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on parent-adolescent positivity and negativity: Implications for genotype-environment correlation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275825
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2016 Feb;28(1):149-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Kristine Marceau
Valerie S Knopik
Jenae M Neiderhiser
Paul Lichtenstein
Erica L Spotts
Jody M Ganiban
David Reiss
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2016 Feb;28(1):149-66
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Environment
Family Relations
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genotype
Humans
Male
Mothers
Parent-Child Relations
Parents
Social Environment
Sweden
Twins - genetics - psychology
Abstract
We examined how genotype-environment correlation processes differ as a function of adolescent age. We tested whether adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on positivity and negativity in mother-adolescent and father-adolescent relationships using parallel samples of twin parents from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden and twin/sibling adolescents from the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development Study. We inferred differences in the role of passive and nonpassive genotype-environment correlation based on biometric moderation findings. The findings indicated that nonpassive gene-environment correlation played a stronger role for positivity in mother- and father-adolescent relationships in families with older adolescents than in families with younger adolescents, and that passive gene-environment correlation played a stronger role for positivity in the mother-adolescent relationship in families with younger adolescents than in families with older adolescents. Implications of these findings for the timing and targeting of interventions on family relationships are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25924807 View in PubMed
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706 records – page 1 of 71.