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Women's health in northern British Columbia: The role of geography and gender

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101164
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Autumn;10(4):241-253
Publication Type
Article
Date
Autumn-2005
  1 website  
Author
Leipert, BD
Reutter, L
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontartio
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Autumn;10(4):241-253
Date
Autumn-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Canada
Determinants of health
Gender
Physical environment
Political environment
Social environments
Sociocultural environment
Women
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Although research interest in women's health is growing, much of the literature does not sufficiently describe the importance of geography and gender for the health of women. This qualitative study explored factors in the northern Canadian context that influence women's health by interviewing 25 women in northern Canada. RESULTS: Findings reveal that the importance of the northern context for women's health can be attributed to the north's historical location, and its physical, sociocultural and political environments. The northern context contributes to the marginalization of northern women that is characterized by isolation, limited options, limited power and being silenced. CONCLUSION: Health care practice and policy must attend to contextual as well as individual and sociocultural factors if women's health is to be advanced in northern settings.
Online Resources
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Uneven environmental management: a Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166497
Source
Environ Manage. 2007 Jan;39(1):30-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Maureen G Reed
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Saskatchewan, 9 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, S7N 5A5, Saskatchewan, Canada. m.reed@usask.ca
Source
Environ Manage. 2007 Jan;39(1):30-49
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Conservation of Natural Resources
Environment
Environment Design
Environment, Controlled
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Abstract
Advocates of community-based approaches to environmental management argue that by respecting local circumstances, skills, and concerns we may improve the prospects of achieving environmental sustainability; yet, within nation states such as Canada, environmental conditions, management and enforcement costs and capabilities, and power differentials within and among civic and public sectors may result in a highly differentiated capacity for environmental management across different localities and regions. This article draws on insights of political ecology to 1) create a conceptual framework that identifies key elements shaping regional environmental management regimes and to 2) undertake a comparative analysis to assess how elements interact to generate uneven management outcomes. I compare experiences of two Canadian biosphere reserves designated in 2000: Clayoquot Sound, BC; and Redberry Lake, SK. Analysis reveals that differences in governance and institutional capacities in the biosphere reserves are key to explaining uneven local outcomes. Where the public and civic sectors are strong, a robust and publicly vetted form of management will emerge. Where these sectors are weak and land is held as private property, environmental nongovernmental organizations can set the type and level of management, to the exclusion of effective civic and state involvement. This result may improve environmental sustainability but hinder social sustainability of a management regime and raises questions about the efficacy of community-based management.
PubMed ID
17109080 View in PubMed
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Adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on parent-adolescent positivity and negativity: Implications for genotype-environment correlation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275825
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2016 Feb;28(1):149-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Kristine Marceau
Valerie S Knopik
Jenae M Neiderhiser
Paul Lichtenstein
Erica L Spotts
Jody M Ganiban
David Reiss
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2016 Feb;28(1):149-66
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Environment
Family Relations
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genotype
Humans
Male
Mothers
Parent-Child Relations
Parents
Social Environment
Sweden
Twins - genetics - psychology
Abstract
We examined how genotype-environment correlation processes differ as a function of adolescent age. We tested whether adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on positivity and negativity in mother-adolescent and father-adolescent relationships using parallel samples of twin parents from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden and twin/sibling adolescents from the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development Study. We inferred differences in the role of passive and nonpassive genotype-environment correlation based on biometric moderation findings. The findings indicated that nonpassive gene-environment correlation played a stronger role for positivity in mother- and father-adolescent relationships in families with older adolescents than in families with younger adolescents, and that passive gene-environment correlation played a stronger role for positivity in the mother-adolescent relationship in families with younger adolescents than in families with older adolescents. Implications of these findings for the timing and targeting of interventions on family relationships are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25924807 View in PubMed
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[Is Icelandic natural environment as clean as we like to think?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83181
Source
Laeknabladid. 2005 Oct;91(10):723
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Guethnason Thornórólfur
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, Iceland University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland. thorgud@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2005 Oct;91(10):723
Date
Oct-2005
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Iceland
PubMed ID
16219970 View in PubMed
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A concept and strategies for health protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251245
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1976 Mar 6;114(5):459-61, 477
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1976
Author
D F Bray
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1976 Mar 6;114(5):459-61, 477
Date
Mar-6-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug and Narcotic Control
Environment
Government Agencies
Health
Humans
Preventive Medicine
Social Environment
PubMed ID
1253092 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial aspects of the work environment: a group approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237058
Source
J Occup Med. 1986 May;28(5):384-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Source
Behav Genet. 2019 01; 49(1):1-10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Date
01-2019
Author
Kenneth S Kendler
Henrik Ohlsson
Paul Lichtenstein
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Box 980126, Richmond, VA, 23298-0126, USA. Kenneth.Kendler@vcuhealth.org.
Source
Behav Genet. 2019 01; 49(1):1-10
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
Keywords
Computer simulation
Environment
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Male
Models, Genetic
Parents
Phenotype
Siblings - ethnology
Social Environment
Sweden
Twins - genetics
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
While a standard part of twin modeling, the magnitude of shared environment (c2) is rarely examined by comparing estimates obtained using other methods. To clarify these effects on familial resemblance, we estimated c2 for 20 diverse phenotypes in: (i) monozygotic and dizygotic twins, (ii) all step-siblings, and (iii) reared together and apart half-siblings, ascertained from the Swedish general population. The mean c2 estimates (±?95% CIs) differed across methods and were higher from twins (0.18; 0.13-0.23) than from the step (0.12; 0.09-0.14) and half-sibs (0.09; 0.06-0.13). c2 estimates correlated moderately across these three methods (ICC?=?+?0.28). When step-siblings from blended (each sib biologically related to one parent) and adoption-like families (one sib offspring of both parents and one of neither), were examined separately, resemblance was much lower in the latter. We need to clarify the range of environmental processes now considered together under the term "shared environment."
PubMed ID
30536082 View in PubMed
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Issues promoting and hindering girls' well-being in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289564
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-01-2017
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Date
Aug-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent health
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Environment
Abstract
Well-being is a complex concept that includes elements of inequality due to socio-economics, living environment or gender. Every person also encounters unique situations and has different experiences of well-being. This qualitative study aims to describe what issues promote and hinder the well-being of girls aged 13-16 in Northern Finland. A total of 117 girls aged 13-16 living in Northern Finland were asked to write about the issues that hinder and promote their well-being. The girls' responses were analysed using content analysis. After analysis, two combining categories were discovered: issues hindering well-being were a debilitating sphere of life and negative experiences in life, and issues promoting well-being were positive subjective sensations and favourably perceived conditions. The results of this study indicate that girls' well-being is connected to their social and physical environment. As the girls' view of the issues that promote or hinder health are connected and interact with their living environment, there is also a need for health promotion measures to take into account both the individuals and the environment in which they function and live. This view challenges us to see health promotion in a broader way-a way which takes into account structural and political factors, individual consultation and empowerment.
PubMed ID
26902099 View in PubMed
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Issues promoting and hindering girls' well-being in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289722
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-01-2017
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Date
Aug-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent health
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Environment
Abstract
Well-being is a complex concept that includes elements of inequality due to socio-economics, living environment or gender. Every person also encounters unique situations and has different experiences of well-being. This qualitative study aims to describe what issues promote and hinder the well-being of girls aged 13-16 in Northern Finland. A total of 117 girls aged 13-16 living in Northern Finland were asked to write about the issues that hinder and promote their well-being. The girls' responses were analysed using content analysis. After analysis, two combining categories were discovered: issues hindering well-being were a debilitating sphere of life and negative experiences in life, and issues promoting well-being were positive subjective sensations and favourably perceived conditions. The results of this study indicate that girls' well-being is connected to their social and physical environment. As the girls' view of the issues that promote or hinder health are connected and interact with their living environment, there is also a need for health promotion measures to take into account both the individuals and the environment in which they function and live. This view challenges us to see health promotion in a broader way-a way which takes into account structural and political factors, individual consultation and empowerment.
PubMed ID
26902099 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A model for work environment surveys]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49497
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Jan 31;70(5):342-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-1973

3956 records – page 1 of 396.