Skip header and navigation

Refine By

18 records – page 1 of 2.

A 2-year entomological study of potential malaria vectors in central Italy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150651
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2009 Dec;9(6):703-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Marco Di Luca
Daniela Boccolini
Francesco Severini
Luciano Toma
Francesca Mancini Barbieri
Antonio Massa
Roberto Romi
Author Affiliation
Vector Borne Diseases and International Health Section, Department of Infectious, Parasitic, and Immuno-Mediated Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy. marco.diluca@iss.it
Source
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2009 Dec;9(6):703-11
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anopheles - genetics - parasitology - physiology
Culicidae - growth & development
Databases, Nucleic Acid
Ecosystem
Entomology
Female
Geography
Humans
Insect Vectors - genetics - parasitology - physiology
Italy
Longitudinal Studies
Malaria - parasitology - transmission
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Population Density
Abstract
Europe was officially declared free from malaria in 1975; nevertheless, this disease remains a potential problem related to the presence of former vectors, belonging to the Anopheles maculipennis complex. Autochthonous-introduced malaria cases, recently reported in European countries, together with the predicted climatic and environmental changes, have increased the concern of health authorities over the possible resurgence of this disease in the Mediterranean Basin. In Italy, to study the distribution and bionomics of indigenous anopheline populations and to assess environmental parameters that could influence their dynamics, an entomological study was carried out in 2005-2006 in an at-risk study area. This model area is represented by the geographical region named the Maremma, a Tyrrhenian costal plain in Central Italy, where malaria was hyperendemic up to the 1950s. Fortnightly, entomological surveys (April-October) were carried out in four selected sites with different ecological features. Morphological and molecular characterization, blood meal identification, and parity rate assessment of the anophelines were performed. In total, 8274 mosquitoes were collected, 7691 of which were anophelines. Six Anopheles species were recorded, the most abundant of which were Anopheles labranchiae and An. maculipennis s.s. An. labranchiae is predominant in the coastal plain, where it is present in scattered foci. However, this species exhibits a wider than expected range: in fact it has been recorded, for the first time, inland where An. maculipennis s.s. is the most abundant species. Both species fed on a wide range of animal hosts, also showing a marked aggressiveness on humans, when available. Our findings demonstrated the high receptivity of the Maremma area, where the former malaria vector, An. labranchiae, occurs at different densities related to the kind of environment, climatic parameters, and anthropic activities.
PubMed ID
19485768 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic Health Research Center publications

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289409
Source
U.S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Arctic Health Research Center. v.
Publication Type
Report
Source
U.S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, Arctic Health Research Center. v.
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Catalogs
Bibliography
Public Health
Arctic medicine
Entomology
Epidemiology
Nutrition
Metabolic disease
Physiology
Zoonotic disease
Notes
ALASKA RA440.87.U5A72 (1949-68; 1950-54; 1969-73)
Less detail

Barcoding the Collembola of Churchill: a molecular taxonomic reassessment of species diversity in a sub-Arctic area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262460
Source
Mol Ecol Resour. 2014 Mar;14(2):249-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
David Porco
Dariusz Skarzynski
Thibaud Decaëns
Paul D N Hebert
Louis Deharveng
Source
Mol Ecol Resour. 2014 Mar;14(2):249-61
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Arthropods - classification - genetics
DNA Barcoding, Taxonomic - methods
Entomology - methods
Genetic Variation
Genotyping Techniques - methods
Manitoba
Molecular Sequence Data
Abstract
Although their functional importance in ecosystems is increasingly recognized, soil-dwelling micro-arthropods are usually poorly known in comparison with their above-ground counterparts. Collembola constitute a significant and species-rich component of the soil biodiversity, but it remains a woefully understudied group because of the taxonomic impediment. The ever-increasing use of molecular taxonomic tools, such as DNA barcoding, provides a possible solution. Here, we test the use of this approach through a diversity survey of Collembola from the vicinity of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, and compare the results with previous surveys in the same area and in other sub-Arctic regions. The systematic barcoding campaign at Churchill revealed a diverse collembolan fauna consisting of 97 species-level MOTUs in six types of habitats. If all these MOTUs are confirmed as species, this richness would be far higher than prior records for Arctic Canada and could lead to reconsider the actual diversity of the group in Arctic environments.
PubMed ID
24112538 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Public Health Rep. 1956 Jun;71(6):616-21.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1956
improve the contributions of entomology to polar medicine. Canadian entomologists and personnel of the Arctic Health Research Center have pushed back the frontiers of Alaskan insect lore and have provided basic biological contributions to knowledge of mosquitoes. A few years ago they discovered a
  1 document  
Author
Frohne, WC.
Source
Public Health Rep. 1956 Jun;71(6):616-21.
Date
1956
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
1807187
Keywords
Animals
Biology
Culicidae
Entomology
Alaska
PubMed ID
13323238 View in PubMed
Documents

pubhealthreporig00150-0102.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

A brief history of the discovery of tick-borne encephalitis virus in the late 1930s (based on reminiscences of members of the expeditions, their colleagues, and relatives).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291898
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 10; 8(6):813-820
Publication Type
Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portraits
Review
Date
10-2017
Author
Vladimir I Zlobin
Vanda V Pogodina
Olaf Kahl
Author Affiliation
Irkutsk State Medical University, Ministry of Public Health of Russian Federation, Irkutsk, Krasnogo Vosstaniya Str. 1, 664003, Russian Federation.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 10; 8(6):813-820
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portraits
Review
Keywords
Animals
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - physiology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - history - transmission
Entomology - history
Expeditions - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Ixodes - virology
Siberia
USSR
Virology - history
Abstract
Tick-borne encephalitis virus is the etiological agent of a severe human disease transmitted by hard ticks. It occurs in large parts of eastern, central, and western Asia and in Europe with thousands of human cases each year. Here, the discovery of the virus by Soviet scientists in the late 1930s in the Far East is described. The pioneering work involved with this discovery, which resulted in great scientific and epidemiological achievement, was undertaken under the most difficult conditions, and some of the scientists and their technical assistants paid for it with their health and even their lives. This paper briefly outlines the steps on the way that elucidated the basic etiology and eco-epidemiology of the disease, and does not omit that, as one result of the expeditions and the political situation in the former Soviet Union at that time, some scientists were sent to prison.
PubMed ID
28526419 View in PubMed
Less detail

Citizen scientist lepidopterists exposed to potential carcinogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278291
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2016 May;91:1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Petri J Vainio
Tero Vahlberg
Jyrki Liesivuori
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2016 May;91:1-7
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinogens - toxicity
Chloroform - toxicity
Entomology - manpower
Ethane - analogs & derivatives - toxicity
Finland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - toxicity
Lepidoptera
Occupational Exposure
Abstract
Lepidopterists use substantial volumes of solvents, such as chloroform, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and xylene, in their traps when collecting faunistic and phenological data. A majority of them are citizen scientists and thus in part not identified by occupational healthcare as being at risk due to solvent handling. We surveyed the extent of solvent use, the frequency and extent of potential exposure and the safety precautions taken in trapping and catch handling by Finnish lepidopterists. Chloroform and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane were the most frequently used anaesthetics. Potential for exposure prevailed during trap maintenance and exploration and catch sorting. Adequate protection against vapours or spills was worn by 17% during trap exploration. Subjects completed a median of 100 trap explorations per season. Dermal or mucosal spills were recorded at a median rate of one spill per ten (chloroform) to 20 (1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and xylene) trap explorations. Median annual cumulative durations of 8 and 20 h of exposure to chloroform and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane at levels above odour detection threshold were reported. Subjective adverse findings possibly related solvents had been noticed by 24 (9.8%) lepidopterists. All the events had been mild to moderate. No factor predicting unsafe procedures or adverse reactions was recorded despite thorough statistical testing.
PubMed ID
26945614 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Current problems in medical entomology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199281
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1999 Apr-Jun;(2):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Alekseev
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1999 Apr-Jun;(2):7-10
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs
Entomology - trends
Humans
Insect control
Insect Vectors
Russia
Abstract
The major problems facing medical entomology as a science and practical health care facilities in the Russian Federations allows to outline the tasks to be solved in order of their priority and significance. These include the study and monitoring of tick-borne infections, resurrecting malaria, gnat-induced diseases, acariases, allergosis and pediculosis. It is emphasized that medical entomology as a science cannot develop since the man-made changes of the environment and the predicted global warming of the Earth climate are not taken into account. The present status of medical entomological service is considered to be poor. Governmental support is required.
PubMed ID
10703198 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dead larvae of Cynomya mortuorum (L.) (Diptera, Calliphoridae) as indicators of the post-mortem interval--a case history from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194016
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Aug 15;120(1-2):77-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2001
Author
M. Starkeby
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Oslo, N-0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2001 Aug 15;120(1-2):77-8
Date
Aug-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cause of Death
Diptera - growth & development
Entomology
Female
Forensic Medicine - methods
Humans
Life Cycle Stages
Norway
Postmortem Changes
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
A case history where the presence of dead third instar larvae of Cynomya mortuorum (L.) provided information regarding the post-mortem interval is reported. Some (15-20) dead larvae were located in the mouth of the deceased, and data on the seasonal distribution of this species placed the time of death some 7 months prior to the discovery in May 1996, i.e. to October 1995. In this case, the entomological data matched the information later provided by the police.
PubMed ID
11457614 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decomposition and arthropod succession in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267469
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2013 Mar;58(2):413-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Katherine Bygarski
Helene N LeBlanc
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2013 Mar;58(2):413-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Beetles
Canada
Diptera
Entomology
Feeding Behavior
Forensic Pathology
Humidity
Larva
Postmortem Changes
Temperature
Abstract
Forensic arthropod succession patterns are known to vary between regions. However, the northern habitats of the globe have been largely left unstudied. Three pig carcasses were studied outdoors in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. Adult and immature insects were collected for identification and comparison. The dominant Diptera and Coleoptera species at all carcasses were Protophormia terraneovae (R-D) (Fam: Calliphoridae) and Thanatophilus lapponicus (Herbst) (Fam: Silphidae), respectively. Rate of decomposition, patterns of Diptera and Coleoptera succession, and species dominance were shown to differ from previous studies in temperate regions, particularly as P. terraenovae showed complete dominance among blowfly species. Rate of decomposition through the first four stages was generally slow, and the last stage of decomposition was not observed at any carcass due to time constraints. It is concluded that biogeoclimatic range has a significant effect on insect presence and rate of decomposition, making it an important factor to consider when calculating a postmortem interval.
PubMed ID
23278195 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.