Skip header and navigation

Refine By

26 records – page 1 of 3.

[An outbreak of Campylobacter enteritis in soldiers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75657
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Aug 1;145(31):2361-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1983

An outbreak of duck virus enteritis among ducks and geese in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57877
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1983 Nov;35(11):385-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1983
Author
M. Prip
B. Jylling
J. Flensburg
B. Bloch
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1983 Nov;35(11):385-96
Date
Nov-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bursa of Fabricius - ultrastructure
Cloaca - ultrastructure
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Ducks - microbiology
Enteritis - epidemiology - microbiology - veterinary
Female
Geese - microbiology
Liver - ultrastructure
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Poultry Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Vaccination - veterinary
Abstract
Duck virus enteritis occurred in the spring of 1982 among domesticated mallards, Pekin ducks and geese producing eggs for the same hatchery. Wild mallards may have introduced the infection to the domestic birds. High mortality occurred in one flock of Pekin ducks and in young geese. Mallards were also affected, but less severely. Gross and microscopic lesions were in general typical for DVE. Virus was demonstrated by electron microscopy of Bursa fabricii from experimentally infected ducklings. Neutralizing antibodies were found in serum from ducks, surviving an acute outbreak in the flock. Vaccination was performed and hygienic precautions taken, and transmission from infected flocks to progeny was negligible.
PubMed ID
6672760 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between campylobacteriosis, agriculture and drinking water: a case-case study in a region of British Columbia, Canada, 2005-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256740
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Oct;142(10):2075-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
E. Galanis
S. Mak
M. Otterstatter
M. Taylor
M. Zubel
T K Takaro
M. Kuo
P. Michel
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control,Vancouver, BC,Canada.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Oct;142(10):2075-84
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Agriculture - statistics & numerical data
Amebiasis - epidemiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Campylobacter Infections - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology
Cyclosporiasis - epidemiology
Drinking Water
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology
Enteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology
Female
Geographic Mapping
Giardiasis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Social Class
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vibrio Infections - epidemiology
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Yersinia Infections - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We studied the association between drinking water, agriculture and sporadic human campylobacteriosis in one region of British Columbia (BC), Canada. We compared 2992 cases of campylobacteriosis to 4816 cases of other reportable enteric diseases in 2005-2009 using multivariate regression. Cases were geocoded and assigned drinking water source, rural/urban environment and socioeconomic status (SES) according to the location of their residence using geographical information systems analysis methods. The odds of campylobacteriosis compared to enteric disease controls were higher for individuals serviced by private wells than municipal surface water systems (odds ratio 1·4, 95% confidence interval 1·1-1·8). In rural settings, the odds of campylobacteriosis were higher in November (P = 0·014). The odds of campylobacteriosis were higher in individuals aged ?15 years, especially in those with higher SES. In this region of BC, campylobacteriosis risk, compared to other enteric diseases, seems to be mediated by vulnerable drinking water sources and rural factors. Consideration should be given to further support well-water users and to further study the microbiological impact of agriculture on water.
PubMed ID
24892423 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A waterborne outbreak of Campylobacter jejuni infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235576
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1987 Feb 10;107(4):349-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1987

Campylobacter enteritis: incidence in central New Brunswick, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241975
Source
Can J Public Health. 1983 May-Jun;74(3):195-8
Publication Type
Article

[Campylobacter epidemiology - 3 epidemics caused by food contamination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40461
Source
Lakartidningen. 1982 Apr 28;79(17):1676-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-1982

[Child health care among Turkish immigrants--an attempt to bridge cultural cleavages]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41665
Source
Nord Med. 1978 Jun;93(5-6):126-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978

26 records – page 1 of 3.