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1951 influenza epidemic, England and Wales, Canada, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169257
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Cécile Viboud
Theresa Tam
Douglas Fleming
Mark A Miller
Lone Simonsen
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. viboudc@mail.nih.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - history
England - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Middle Aged
Seasons
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Influenza poses a continuing public health threat in epidemic and pandemic seasons. The 1951 influenza epidemic (A/H1N1) caused an unusually high death toll in England; in particular, weekly deaths in Liverpool even surpassed those of the 1918 pandemic. We further quantified the death rate of the 1951 epidemic in 3 countries. In England and Canada, we found that excess death rates from pneumonia and influenza and all causes were substantially higher for the 1951 epidemic than for the 1957 and 1968 pandemics (by > or =50%). The age-specific pattern of deaths in 1951 was consistent with that of other interpandemic seasons; no age shift to younger age groups, reminiscent of pandemics, occurred in the death rate. In contrast to England and Canada, the 1951 epidemic was not particularly severe in the United States. Why this epidemic was so severe in some areas but not others remains unknown and highlights major gaps in our understanding of interpandemic influenza.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16704816 View in PubMed
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Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Acute sports injuries. Way in which sports are played is important factor in injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212348
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 30;312(7034):844
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-1996
Author
J. Nicholl
P. Coleman
Source
BMJ. 1996 Mar 30;312(7034):844
Date
Mar-30-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletic Injuries - etiology
England - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Wales - epidemiology
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-88520333
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 1991 Mar;25(1):61-61913036
Comment On: BMJ. 1995 Dec 2;311(7018):1465-88520333
PubMed ID
8608301 View in PubMed
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The ADDITION study: proposed trial of the cost-effectiveness of an intensive multifactorial intervention on morbidity and mortality among people with Type 2 diabetes detected by screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47804
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
T. Lauritzen
S. Griffin
K. Borch-Johnsen
N J Wareham
B H Wolffenbuttel
G. Rutten
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24 Suppl 3:S6-11
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - therapy
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications - economics - therapy
Intervention Studies
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Netherlands - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines
Prevalence
Primary Health Care - economics
Randomized Controlled Trials - methods
Risk factors
Vascular Diseases - etiology - mortality - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The overall aims of the ADDITION study are to evaluate whether screening for prevalent undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes is feasible, and whether subsequent optimised intensive treatment of diabetes, and associated risk factors, is feasible and beneficial. DESIGN: Population-based screening in three European countries followed by an open, randomised controlled trial. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: People aged 40-69 y in the community, without known diabetes, will be offered a random capillary blood glucose screening test by their primary care physicians, followed, if equal to or greater than 5.5 mmol/l, by fasting and 2-h post-glucose-challenge blood glucose measurements. Three thousand newly diagnosed patients will subsequently receive conventional treatment (according to current national guidelines) or intensive multifactorial treatment (lifestyle advice, prescription of aspirin and ACE-inhibitors, in addition to protocol-driven tight control of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol). Patients allocated to intensive treatment will be further randomised to centre-specific interventions to motivate adherence to lifestyle changes and medication. Duration of follow-up is planned for 5 y. Endpoints will include mortality, macrovascular and microvascular complications, patient health status and satisfaction, process-of-care indicators and costs.
PubMed ID
11063279 View in PubMed
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The AdHOC Study of older adults' adherence to medication in 11 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171755
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Claudia Cooper
Iain Carpenter
Cornelius Katona
Marianne Schroll
Cordula Wagner
Daniela Fialova
Gill Livingston
Author Affiliation
Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, Dept. of Mental Health Sciences, University College London, Archway Campus, Holborn Union Building, Highgate Hill, London N19 5NL, UK.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Demography
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Authors investigated, cross-nationally, the factors, including demographic, psychiatric (including cognitive), physical, and behavioral, determining whether older people take their prescribed medication. Older adults are prescribed more medication than any other group, and poor adherence is a common reason for non-response to medication.
Researchers interviewed 3,881 people over age 65 who receive home care services in 11 countries, administering a structured interview in participants' homes. The main outcome measure was the percentage of participants not adherent to medication.
In all, 12.5% of people (N=456) reported that they were not fully adherent to medication. Non-adherence was predicted by problem drinking (OR=3.6), not having a doctor review their medication (OR=3.3), greater cognitive impairment (OR=1.4 for every one-point increase in impairment), good physical health (OR=1.2), resisting care (OR=2.1), being unmarried (OR=2.3), and living in the Czech Republic (OR=4.7) or Germany (OR=1.4).
People who screen positive for problem drinking and who have dementia (often undiagnosed) are less likely to adhere to medication. Therefore, doctors should consider dementia and problem drinking when prescribing for older adults. Interventions to improve adherence in older adults might be more effective if targeted at these groups. It is possible that medication-review enhances adherence by improving the doctor-patient relationship or by emphasizing the need for medications.
PubMed ID
16319299 View in PubMed
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Adolescent experience predicts longevity: evidence from historical epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260065
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
A. Falconi
A. Gemmill
R E Dahl
R. Catalano
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
England - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
France - epidemiology
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Longevity - physiology
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Human development reportedly includes critical and sensitive periods during which environmental stressors can affect traits that persist throughout life. Controversy remains over which of these periods provides an opportunity for such stressors to affect health and longevity. The elaboration of reproductive biology and its behavioral sequelae during adolescence suggests such a sensitive period, particularly among males. We test the hypothesis that life expectancy at age 20 among males exposed to life-threatening stressors during early adolescence will fall below that among other males. We apply time-series methods to cohort mortality data in France between 1816 and 1919, England and Wales between 1841 and 1919, and Sweden between 1861 and 1919. Our results indicate an inverse association between cohort death rates at ages 10-14 and cohort life expectancy at age 20. Our findings imply that better-informed and more strategic management of the stressors encountered by early adolescents may improve population health.
PubMed ID
24901655 View in PubMed
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Aging, spinal cord injury, and quality of life: structural relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184088
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Aug;84(8):1137-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Robert Arnold
Susan Charlifue
Clive Glass
Gordana Savic
Hans Frankel
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. mccollm@post.queensu.ca
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Aug;84(8):1137-44
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Colorado - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Spinal Cord Injuries - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To quantify relationships among 3 sets of factors: demographic factors, health and disability factors, and quality of life (QOL).
Part of a program of longitudinal research on aging and spinal cord injury (SCI) involving 3 populations: American, British, and Canadian. The present analysis uses data from the 1999 interval.
The Canadian sample was derived from the member database of the Ontario and Manitoba divisions of the Canadian Paraplegic Association. The British sample was recruited from a national and a regional SCI center in England. The American sample was recruited through a hospital in Colorado.
A sample of 352 participants was assembled from 4 large, well-established databases. The sample included individuals who had incurred an SCI at least 20 years earlier, were admitted to rehabilitation within 1 year of injury, and were between the ages of 15 and 55 at the time of injury.
Not applicable.
A combination of self-completed questionnaires and interviews. Data included demographics, injury-related variables, health and disability-related factors, QOL, and perceptions about aging.
Using linear structural relationships modeling, we found that QOL was affected both directly and indirectly by age, health and disability problems, and perceptions of aging. Two surprising findings were as follows: those who experienced fewer disability-related problems were more likely to report a qualitative disadvantage in aging, and the younger members of the sample were more likely to report fatigue.
Fatigue is a concern because of the relationship of fatigue with perceived temporal disadvantage in aging, health problems, and disability problems. This finding highlights the need for clinical vigilance among those just beginning to experience the effects of aging.
PubMed ID
12917851 View in PubMed
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ALL IN IT TOGETHER? THE EFFECTS OF RECESSION ON POPULATION HEALTH AND HEALTH INEQUALITIES IN ENGLAND AND SWEDEN, 1991-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267722
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2015;45(1):3-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Alison Copeland
Clare Bambra
Lotta Nylén
Adetayo Kasim
Mylène Riva
Sarah Curtis
Bo Burström
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2015;45(1):3-24
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Economic Recession - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
Global health
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Politics
Sex Distribution
Social Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This article is the first to comparatively examine the effects of two recessions on population health and health inequalities in the two historically contrasting welfare states of England and Sweden. Data from 1991-2010 on self-reported general health, age, gender, and educational status were obtained from the Health Survey for England, the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions, and the European Union Survey of Income and Living Conditions, for individuals aged over 16. Generalized linear models were used to test the effects of recessions on self-reported health and educational inequalities in health. Overall, recessions had a significant positive effect on the health of women--but not men-in both England (4%) and Sweden (7%). In England, this improvement was only enjoyed by the most educated women, with the health of less educated women declining during recession. In contrast, in Sweden, the health of all women improved significantly during recession regardless of their educational status, although the most educated benefitted the most. Relative educational inequalities in self-reported health therefore increased during recessions in both countries by 14 percent (England) and 17 percent (Sweden) but for different reasons. This study suggests that Sweden's welfare state protects the health of all during recessions.
PubMed ID
26460444 View in PubMed
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Analysis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a multistep process: a population-based modelling study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260423
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2014 Nov;13(11):1108-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Ammar Al-Chalabi
Andrea Calvo
Adriano Chio
Shuna Colville
Cathy M Ellis
Orla Hardiman
Mark Heverin
Robin S Howard
Mark H B Huisman
Noa Keren
P Nigel Leigh
Letizia Mazzini
Gabriele Mora
Richard W Orrell
James Rooney
Kirsten M Scott
William J Scotton
Meinie Seelen
Christopher E Shaw
Katie S Sidle
Robert Swingler
Miho Tsuda
Jan H Veldink
Anne E Visser
Leonard H van den Berg
Neil Pearce
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2014 Nov;13(11):1108-13
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disease Progression
England - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Italy - epidemiology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Scotland - epidemiology
Abstract
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis shares characteristics with some cancers, such as onset being more common in later life, progression usually being rapid, the disease affecting a particular cell type, and showing complex inheritance. We used a model originally applied to cancer epidemiology to investigate the hypothesis that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a multistep process.
We generated incidence data by age and sex from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis population registers in Ireland (registration dates 1995-2012), the Netherlands (2006-12), Italy (1995-2004), Scotland (1989-98), and England (2002-09), and calculated age and sex-adjusted incidences for each register. We regressed the log of age-specific incidence against the log of age with least squares regression. We did the analyses within each register, and also did a combined analysis, adjusting for register.
We identified 6274 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from a catchment population of about 34 million people. We noted a linear relationship between log incidence and log age in all five registers: England r(2)=0·95, Ireland r(2)=0·99, Italy r(2)=0·95, the Netherlands r(2)=0·99, and Scotland r(2)=0·97; overall r(2)=0·99. All five registers gave similar estimates of the linear slope ranging from 4·5 to 5·1, with overlapping confidence intervals. The combination of all five registers gave an overall slope of 4·8 (95% CI 4·5-5·0), with similar estimates for men (4·6, 4·3-4·9) and women (5·0, 4·5-5·5).
A linear relationship between the log incidence and log age of onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is consistent with a multistage model of disease. The slope estimate suggests that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a six-step process. Identification of these steps could lead to preventive and therapeutic avenues.
UK Medical Research Council; UK Economic and Social Research Council; Ireland Health Research Board; The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMw); the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, University, and Research in Italy; the Motor Neurone Disease Association of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; and the European Commission (Seventh Framework Programme).
Notes
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PubMed ID
25300936 View in PubMed
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230 records – page 1 of 23.