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986 records – page 1 of 99.

19th Anglo-Danish-Dutch Diabetes Group meeting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47563
Source
Diabet Med. 2002 Mar;19(3):259
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Mar-2002
Author
E J P de Koning
T. Vilsboll
F. Dela
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Vascular Medicine, Diabetes and Endocrinology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Source
Diabet Med. 2002 Mar;19(3):259
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes mellitus
England
Humans
Netherlands
PubMed ID
11918629 View in PubMed
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100 years of pediatric surgery in Stockholm, with personal memories from the last 50 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60241
Source
Prog Pediatr Surg. 1986;20:17-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
T. Ehrenpreis
Source
Prog Pediatr Surg. 1986;20:17-33
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
England
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Pediatric - history
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - surgery
Pediatrics - history
Portraits
Societies, Medical - history
Surgery - history
Sweden
Abstract
The first children's hospital in Sweden (Kronprinsessan Lovisa's Children's Hospital) was established in Stockholm in 1854. In 1885 it was divided into a medical and a surgical department. This constituted the birth of pediatric surgery in Sweden. Pediatric surgery has been included in undergraduate teaching programs since 1945. A personal Associate Professorate in Pediatric Urology was instituted at the Karolinska Medical School in Stockholm for N. O. Ericsson in the late fifties. Upon his retirement in 1976 this personal chair was converted into an established Professorship in Pediatric Surgery. Pediatric surgery has been recognized as a specialty by our Medical Association since 1947. A survey of the Annual Reports from the Lovisa Hospital from 1885 to 1969 shows three phases in the development of our specialty in Sweden. The first stage extends from 1885 to 1932. During this period the disease pattern was dominated by septic and tuberculous infections, by empyemas, and by ENT diseases. Few cases of congenital malformations were reported. The bulk of general surgery in childhood was performed in the departments of general surgery. The second stage (1932-1945) was characterized by a decreasing incidence of tuberculous infections, by a successive transfer of orthopedic and ENT patients to the Departments of Orthopedic and ENT surgery respectively. During this period, a marked increase occurred in the volume of malformation surgery. This was due to the centralized treatment of congenital anomalies. The third stage started in 1945. The war had ended and we became acquainted with the dramatic development of pediatric surgery in other countries, in particular in the USA. The main advance was the possibility of opening the chest for repair of congenital anomalies of the heart and the great vessels, of the esophagus, and of the diaphragm. Soon afterwards, rectosigmoidectomy was introduced for the treatment of Hirschsprung's disease. In 1952, a second department of pediatric surgery was opened in Stockholm as a part of a new Children's Clinic at the Karolinska University Hospital. The major part of general surgery from the Stockholm area and all of the cardiovascular surgery stayed with the "Lovisa Hospital", while the major part of neonatal surgery and specific abdominal surgery was performed at the Karolinska Hospital. In order to improve the rather underdeveloped situation of pediatric urology, N. O. Ericsson was appointed to the post of Associate Head of the Karolinska Department, soon bringing this field to the frontlines of international standards. This historical review ends with some of the author's personal memories from the last 50 years.
PubMed ID
3095872 View in PubMed
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1951 influenza epidemic, England and Wales, Canada, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169257
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Cécile Viboud
Theresa Tam
Douglas Fleming
Mark A Miller
Lone Simonsen
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. viboudc@mail.nih.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - history
England - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Middle Aged
Seasons
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Influenza poses a continuing public health threat in epidemic and pandemic seasons. The 1951 influenza epidemic (A/H1N1) caused an unusually high death toll in England; in particular, weekly deaths in Liverpool even surpassed those of the 1918 pandemic. We further quantified the death rate of the 1951 epidemic in 3 countries. In England and Canada, we found that excess death rates from pneumonia and influenza and all causes were substantially higher for the 1951 epidemic than for the 1957 and 1968 pandemics (by > or =50%). The age-specific pattern of deaths in 1951 was consistent with that of other interpandemic seasons; no age shift to younger age groups, reminiscent of pandemics, occurred in the death rate. In contrast to England and Canada, the 1951 epidemic was not particularly severe in the United States. Why this epidemic was so severe in some areas but not others remains unknown and highlights major gaps in our understanding of interpandemic influenza.
Notes
Cites: Vaccine. 1999 Jul 30;17 Suppl 1:S3-1010471173
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Cites: Br Med J. 1951 Oct 20;2(4737):921-714869766
PubMed ID
16704816 View in PubMed
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Abortion in adolescence: a four-country comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63836
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2001 Mar-Apr;11(2):73-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Welsh
M. McCarthy
B. Cromer
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals, Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH, USA.
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2001 Mar-Apr;11(2):73-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
England
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Pregnancy
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to conduct a comparison, using qualitative analytic methodology, of perceptions concerning abortion among health care providers and administrators, along with politicians and anti-abortion activists (total n = 75) in Great Britain, Sweden, The Netherlands, and the United States. In none of these countries was there consensus about abortion prior to legalization, and, in all countries, public discussion continues to be present. In general, after legalization of abortion has no longer made it a volatile issue European countries have refocused their energy into providing family planning services, education, and more straightforward access to abortion compared with similar activities in the United States.
PubMed ID
11275509 View in PubMed
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Absence behavior as traffic crash predictor in bus drivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150286
Source
J Safety Res. 2009;40(3):197-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Anders E af Wåhlberg
Lisa Dorn
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. anders.af_wahlberg@psyk.uu.se
Source
J Safety Res. 2009;40(3):197-201
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Accidents, Traffic
Adult
Automobile Driving
England
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Vehicles
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
Various indicators of health have been shown to be associated with traffic crash involvement. As general health is also related to absence from work, the latter variable may be more strongly related to crashes, especially for professional drivers.
Bus driver absence from work was analyzed in association with their crash records. Two British samples and one Swedish sample were used.
One of the British samples yielded fair correlations between crash record and absence, while for the other the effect was restricted to the first three months of driving. The Swedish data had effects in the expected direction but these were not significant.
The use of an indirect, overall measurement of health, may be a viable method for predicting the traffic crash involvement for professional drivers, although replications are needed in larger samples and other populations.
The use of absence records for the identification of at risk drivers would seem to be a simple and useful method for companies with major fleets, and it also shows the importance of promoting employee health and well being at work as a potential method of reducing the cost, not only of absenteeism, but also of crashes in company vehicles.
PubMed ID
19527813 View in PubMed
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Absence of serotype-specific surface antigen and altered teichoic acid glycosylation among epidemic-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197060
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E E Clark
I. Wesley
F. Fiedler
N. Promadej
S. Kathariou
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Oct;38(10):3856-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Surface - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Microbiology
Glycosylation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Mexico - epidemiology
New England - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Serotyping
Teichoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have often involved strains of serotype 4b. Examination of multiple isolates from three different outbreaks revealed that ca. 11 to 29% of each epidemic population consisted of strains which were negative with the serotype-specific monoclonal antibody c74.22, lacked galactose from the teichoic acid of the cell wall, and were resistant to the serotype 4b-specific phage 2671.
Notes
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Cites: Lett Appl Microbiol. 1996 Jul;23(1):55-608679144
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Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1997 Aug;63(8):3085-99251194
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1999 Jan;181(2):418-259882654
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1969 May;98(2):486-934977480
PubMed ID
11015420 View in PubMed
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Acculturation mode, identity variation, and psychosocial adjustment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211379
Source
J Soc Psychol. 1996 Aug;136(4):493-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
T. Damji
R. Clément
K A Noels
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Soc Psychol. 1996 Aug;136(4):493-500
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Depressive Disorder - ethnology
England - ethnology
Female
France - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Social Adjustment
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Abstract
The hypothesis that it is the variability of a person's identity--as opposed to the particular combinations of identities--that produces stress during the acculturation process was examined. Two hundred ninety-five native Anglophone students at the University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, provided demographic data and completed the following measures: the Beck Depression Inventory (Beck & Beck, 1972), Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (1965), the Situated Identity Measure (Clément & Noels, 1992), and the Psychological Stress Measure (Lemyre, Tessier, & Fillion, 1990). Results of ANOVAs contrasting level of identification and variability of identification indicated that an exclusively Anglophone identity was related to a higher level of depression, lower self-esteem, and a higher level of stress than the other modes of acculturation, but only when the variability in identity with the English group was high. Thus, the participants who identified strongly with the English group but were not committed to this identity experienced more psychological adjustment problems.
PubMed ID
8855379 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of PBDEs in stranded harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) from the Northeastern United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296611
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2018 Jul; 138:96-101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Brianne K Soulen
Barney J Venables
David W Johnston
Aaron P Roberts
Author Affiliation
Dep. of Biological Sciences, Advanced Environmental Research Institute, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76201, USA. Electronic address: brianne.soulen@unt.edu.
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2018 Jul; 138:96-101
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - metabolism
New England
Seals, Earless - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Abstract
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are highly lipophilic components of brominated flame retardants that are environmentally persistent and bioaccumulate. PBDEs are taken up from the gastrointestinal tract and accumulate mainly in fat depots and liver tissues. Seal species inhabiting Arctic and sub-Arctic regions can have upwards of 30% of their body mass composed of blubber. When those blubber stores are mobilized for energy, stored toxicants are also released into circulation. Most studies reporting accumulation of PBDEs in seals have focused on harbor and grey seals with few examining harp and hooded seals. In this study, PBDEs concentrations were analyzed in seal blubber from 21 stranded harp and 9 stranded hooded seals sampled along the northeast coast of the U.S. (1999-2010). A PBDE congener profile was determined for each individual. The results show that both species of seals are accumulating PBDEs with BDE-47 being the dominant congener. Mean ?PBDE concentrations in harp seals were 70.55?±?33.59?ng/g ww and for hooded seals 94.28?±?42.65?ng/g ww. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies reporting a decrease in bioaccumulation with an increase in bromination. For both species, BDE-47 represented the highest percentage of the ?PBDEs, composing over 50% of the ?PBDEs in harp seals. When compared to stranding condition code, animals found alive had overall higher PBDE concentrations than those found in a state of moderate decomposition. This difference could be due to decreased blubber levels in the decomposed animals or potential degradation of the compounds in the blubber. Almost all seals used in this study were yearlings which is the most likely age class to strand. Yearling seals are at a crucial stage of development, especially of their immune system, which can be impacted by high levels of contaminants like PBDEs and increase the susceptibility to disease.
PubMed ID
29706368 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of CT scan measurements of the medial temporal lobe in routine dementia diagnostics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52157
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;18(4):308-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
A R Oksengaard
M. Haakonsen
R. Dullerud
K. Engedal
K. Laake
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. a.r.h.oksengard@ioks.uio.no
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;18(4):308-12
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - pathology - radiography
England
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Temporal Lobe - pathology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Atrophy of the medial part of the temporal lobe is seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the usefulness of CT scan measurements of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in elderly with suspected dementia. METHODS: MTL measurements were done with callipers by three raters, blinded to the diagnosis and to each other, on scans from 110 subjects with suspected dementia from a memory clinic in Oslo, Norway and 36 participants included in the OPTIMA study, Oxford, England. RESULTS: The correlation between the MTL and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was very low, and there was a marked overlap between Alzheimer and cognitively unimpaired subjects. The inter-rater reliability was lower on the Norwegian than on the OPTIMA scans (R = 0.48 vs R = 0.68), but this was partly explained by larger MTL readings (4.5 mm after adjustment for age, gender and MMSE sumscore) on the OPTIMA scans as the reliability was confounded by MTL width and was higher at larger MTLs. A wider scan width (3 mm vs 2 mm in the OPTIMA scans) can also contribute to differences in reliability. CONCLUSIONS: The published threshold values regarding the CT scan MTL measurements for the diagnosis of AD may be invalid when applied by other radiology departments without a local standardisation and validation.
PubMed ID
12673606 View in PubMed
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986 records – page 1 of 99.