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1024 records – page 1 of 103.

40-year follow-up of overweight children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38058
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-1989
Author
H O Mossberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 1989 Aug 26;2(8661):491-3
Date
Aug-26-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Reference Standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
504 overweight children admitted to hospital between 1921 and 1947 were followed up for 40 years by questionnaires at 10 year intervals. The mean weight for height (W/H) standard deviation score (SDS) reached a maximum in puberty (+3.5). The SDS fell to about +1 in adulthood. 47% patients were still obese (SDS greater than +1) in adulthood; 84.6% of these had SDS more than +2 in childhood. The degree of obesity in the family (parents and grandparents) and the degree of overweight in puberty were the most important factors for weight level in adulthood. Even when their food intake was in accordance with recommended levels, obese children had higher than normal weight as adults. Excessive overweight in puberty (SDS greater than +3) was associated with higher than expected morbidity and mortality in adult life. Weight-reducing measures should be started early in life to improve the unfavourable long-term prognosis for very obese children.
PubMed ID
2570196 View in PubMed
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Ability of insulin to modulate hepatic glucose production in aging rats is impaired by fat accumulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61796
Source
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Jun;278(6):E985-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
G. Gupta
J A Cases
L. She
X H Ma
X M Yang
M. Hu
J. Wu
L. Rossetti
N. Barzilai
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, and the Diabetes Research and Training Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, New York 10461, USA.
Source
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2000 Jun;278(6):E985-91
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Aging
Animals
Body Composition
Energy intake
Gluconeogenesis
Glucose - biosynthesis
Glycogen - metabolism
Insulin - pharmacology
Leptin - metabolism
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Increased total fat mass (FM) and visceral fat (VF) may account in part for age-associated decrease in hepatic insulin action. This study determined whether preventing the changes in body fat distribution abolished this defect throughout aging. We studied the F(1) hybrid of Brown Norway-Fischer 344 rats (n = 29), which we assigned to caloric restriction (CR) or fed ad libitum (AL). CR (55% of the calories consumed by AL) was initiated and used at 2 mo to prevent age-dependent increases in FM and VF. AL rats were studied at 2, 8, and 20 mo; CR rats were studied at 8 and 20 mo. VF and FM remained unchanged throughout aging in CR rats. AL-fed rats at 8 and 20 mo had over fourfold higher FM and VF compared with both CR groups. Insulin clamp studies (3 mU. kg(-1). min(-1) with somatostatin) were performed to assess hepatic insulin sensitivity. Prevention of fat accretion resulted in a marked improvement in insulin action in the suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) (6.3 +/- 0.3 and 7.2 +/- 1.2 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) in 8- and 20-mo CR rats vs. 8.3 +/- 0.5 and 10.8 +/- 0.9 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) in 8- and 20-mo AL rats, respectively). The rate of gluconeogenesis (by enrichment of hepatic uridine diphosphate glucose and phosphoenolpyruvate pools by [(14)C]lactate) was unchanged in all groups. The improvement in hepatic insulin action in the CR group was mostly due to effective suppression of glycogenolysis (4.4 +/- 0.3 and 4.9 +/- 0.3 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) in 8- and 20-mo CR rats vs. 5.8 +/- 0.6 and 8.2 +/- 1.0 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) in 8- and 20-mo AL rats, respectively). The results demonstrated the preservation of hepatic insulin action in aging CR rats. Therefore, body fat and its distribution are major determinants of age-associated hepatic insulin resistance.
PubMed ID
10826999 View in PubMed
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Absence of nutritional or clinical consequences of decentralized bulk food portioning in elderly nursing home residents with dementia in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196462
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Nov;100(11):1354-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
B. Shatenstein
G. Ferland
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Nov;100(11):1354-60
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Canada
Dementia - metabolism
Eating - physiology - psychology
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Weight Gain
Abstract
To evaluate the nutritional and clinical consequences of changing from a centralized food delivery system to decentralized bulk food portioning; a system in which meal portioning occurs on residents' floors of a nursing home.
A pilot study with a pre-post design
The study took place on one floor of a home for elderly persons with dementia. Of the 34 residents, 22 (1 man) participated in this study. Average age was 82 years (range = 55 to 94 years). Nutritional status was verified before introduction of the bulk food portioning system by 3 nonconsecutive days of observed food intakes, anthropometric measurements (height, weight, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-upper-arm circumference), and biochemical parameters (albumin, lymphocytes, glucose, sodium, potassium, transferrin, vitamin B-12, folate, hemoglobin). Trained dietitians collected the dietary and anthropometric data and validated the food intake estimates and anthropometric measurements. Data were also collected 10 weeks after implementation of the new food distribution system.
Paired t tests adjusted by a Bonferroni correction assessed differences between values measured before and after introduction of the new food distribution system.
Average food consumption increased substantially and significantly after introduction of the bulk food portioning system. Mean energy intakes rose from 1,555 to 1,924 kcal/day and most other nutrients also increased, many significantly, but there were no changes in anthropometric values or biochemical parameters, except for albumin level which decreased to the lower normal limit.
Portioning of food in the residents' dining room simulates a homelike atmosphere thereby encouraging increased food consumption. With well-trained and enthusiastic staff, this system could contribute to improved nutritional status in the very elderly, even those who have dementia. Dietitians have a key role to play in overseeing residents' nutritional needs and in training, supervising, and motivating foodservice personnel.
PubMed ID
11103658 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire applied in elderly Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11816
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Nov;46(11):809-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
M. Nes
L. Frost Andersen
K. Solvoll
B. Sandstad
B E Hustvedt
A. Løvø
C A Drevon
Author Affiliation
Section for Dietary Research, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992 Nov;46(11):809-21
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Norway
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The accuracy (reproducibility and relative validity) of a self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaire including 180 food items was evaluated. A total of 38 elderly women kept multiple weighed diet records for a total of 14 days over a 6-week period and filled in the questionnaire both before and after this period. Spearman rank correlations between the nutrient intakes from the two questionnaires varied from 0.43 for carbohydrate to 0.88 for energy percentage from alcohol. The median correlation was 0.70. Seven women whose recorded average energy intake was less than 1.17 times their measured basal metabolic rate were excluded from the analysis comparing the questionnaire and the diet records. The first questionnaire gave on the average 10% higher nutrient median values than the records, while the second questionnaire did not in general produce higher values. Unadjusted correlation coefficients comparing intakes measured by the two methods ranged from 0.31 for vitamin C to 0.79 for energy percentage from carbohydrate, the median coefficient being 0.61. On the average 77% of the subjects were classified in the same (+/- 1) quintile in the first food frequency questionnaire and the diet records. The present study indicates that the self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaire is useful for measuring individual or group intakes for a variety of nutrients.
PubMed ID
1425535 View in PubMed
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Achieving hunter-gatherer fitness in the 21(st) century: back to the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140783
Source
Am J Med. 2010 Dec;123(12):1082-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
James H O'Keefe
Robert Vogel
Carl J Lavie
Loren Cordain
Author Affiliation
Mid America Heart Institute/University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64111, USA. jhokeefe@cc-pc.com
Source
Am J Med. 2010 Dec;123(12):1082-6
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
Energy intake
Exercise
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - etiology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
The systematic displacement from a very physically active lifestyle in our natural outdoor environment to a sedentary, indoor lifestyle is at the root of many of the ubiquitous chronic diseases that are endemic in our culture. The intuitive solution is to simulate the indigenous human activity pattern to the extent that this is possible and practically achievable. Suggestions for exercise mode, duration, intensity, and frequency are outlined with a focus on realigning our daily physical activities with the archetype that is encoded within our genome.
PubMed ID
20843503 View in PubMed
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[Actual diet of children in orphanages]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31096
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
A T Elizarov
L P Volkotrub
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2002;71(5):7-10
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition
Calcium - analysis
Child
Child Nutrition
Diet
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
English Abstract
Female
Food
Food Services - standards
Humans
Iodine - analysis
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Orphanages
Phosphorus - analysis
Siberia
Trace Elements - analysis
Vitamins - analysis
Abstract
The account of quantitative and qualitative structure of diets of children of children's houses has revealed infringements in organisation of mode of a meals, and also unbalance of diet on structure of food substances, including on iodine, that can promote development of iodine-dependence diseases.
PubMed ID
12599990 View in PubMed
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[Actual nutrition study and body weight indices of metallurgical industry workers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62422
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1980 May-Jun;(3):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
B L Smolianskii
L S Shibaeva
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1980 May-Jun;(3):24-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Diet
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Nutrition
Trace Elements - metabolism
Ukraine
Vitamins - metabolism
Abstract
The diet specificity was studied in 335 male workers engaged in blast-furnace and open hearth plants, rail-structural, oxygen converter and sheet-rolling mills of the steel plant. The energy value of the diets under study amounted to 3746-4091 kcal a day, with the mean value being equal to 3947 kcal. The content of proteins including those of animal origin and the content of mineral substances corresponded with health recommendations. The content of carbohydrates and vitamins was slightly less as compared to that according to the recommended physiological requirements. The diet was abundant in fats, particularly in those of animal origin. Overweight was recorded in 18.9% and obesity in 5.8% of the workers.
PubMed ID
7405128 View in PubMed
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Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of mustard, horseradish, black pepper and ginger on energy expenditure, appetite, ad libitum energy intake and energy balance in human subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120287
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
N T Gregersen
A. Belza
M G Jensen
C. Ritz
C. Bitz
O. Hels
E. Frandsen
D J Mela
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):556-63
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Appetite Regulation
Armoracia - chemistry
Black Pepper - adverse effects
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Ginger - chemistry
Humans
Hyperphagia - prevention & control
Lunch
Male
Mustard Plant - chemistry
Postprandial Period
Single-Blind Method
Spices - adverse effects
Thermogenesis
Young Adult
Abstract
Chilli peppers have been shown to enhance diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and reduce energy intake (EI) in some studies, but there are few data on other pungent spices. The primary aim of the present study was to test the acute effects of black pepper (pepper), ginger, horseradish and mustard in a meal on 4 h postprandial DIT. The secondary aim was to examine the effects on subjective appetite measures, ad libitum EI and energy balance. In a five-way placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial, twenty-two young (age 24·9 (SD 4·6) years), normal-weight (BMI 21·8 (SD 2·1) kg/m²) males were randomly assigned to receive a brunch meal with either pepper (1·3 g), ginger (20 g), horseradish (8·3 g), mustard (21 g) or no spices (placebo). The amounts of spices were chosen from pre-testing to make the meal spicy but palatable. No significant treatment effects were observed on DIT, but mustard produced DIT, which tended to be larger than that of placebo (14 %, 59 (SE 3) v. 52 (SE 2) kJ/h, respectively, P=0·08). No other spice induced thermogenic effects approaching statistical significance. Subjective measures of appetite (P>0·85), ad libitum EI (P=0·63) and energy balance (P=0·67) also did not differ between the treatments. Finally, horseradish decreased heart rate (P=0·048) and increased diastolic blood pressure (P= 0·049) compared with placebo. In conclusion, no reliable treatment effects on appetite, EI or energy balance were observed, although mustard tended to be thermogenic at this dose. Further studies should explore the possible strength and mechanisms of the potential thermogenic effect of mustard actives, and potential enhancement by, for example, combinations with other food components.
PubMed ID
23021155 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of the mutations in the beta3-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-1 genes on weight loss and weight maintenance in Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203645
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;83(12):4246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
M. Fogelholm
R. Valve
K. Kukkonen-Harjula
A. Nenonen
V. Hakkarainen
M. Laakso
M. Uusitupa
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion and Research, Tampere, Finland. mikael.fogelholm@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998 Dec;83(12):4246-50
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amino Acid Sequence
Base Sequence
Body Weight - physiology
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Ion Channels
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Mitochondrial Proteins
Mutation - genetics - physiology
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - genetics
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
This study examined whether the Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3-adrenergic receptor (beta3AR) and the A-->G mutation in the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) genes have associations with weight loss and subsequent weight maintenance. Seventy-seven obese (body mass index range, 29-46 kg/m2), clinically healthy, premenopausal women were studied. A 12-wk weight reduction by very low calorie diet (VLCD) was followed by a 40-wk weight maintenance phase. The subjects were divided into four groups according to their beta3AR and UCP-1 genotype: no mutation (control; n=37), only Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3AR gene (n=12), only A-->G mutation in the UCP-1 gene (n=23), and both mutations (n=5). Subjects with both mutations had a lower weight reduction during VLCD than the controls [-10.5+/-0.6 (+/-SEM) vs. -14.0+/-0.5 kg; P=0.051, by ANOVA]. During the maintenance phase, weight in subjects with both mutations increased by 5.8+/-1.5 kg, but remained unchanged in the controls (-0.5+/-0.8 kg; P=0.041). The changes in weight in subjects with only one of the mutation were close to the results in the controls. Resting energy expenditure, adjusted for fat mass, fat-free mass, and maximal aerobic power, did not change differently between the groups throughout the study. The results suggest that a combination of the Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3AR and the A-->G mutation in the UCP-1 genes may be associated with faster weight gain after a VLCD.
PubMed ID
9851758 View in PubMed
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1024 records – page 1 of 103.