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Are snacking patterns associated with risk of overweight among Kahnawake schoolchildren?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149332
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Feb;13(2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Genevieve Mercille
Olivier Receveur
Ann C Macaulay
Author Affiliation
Ecole de santé publique, Université de Montréal, PO Box 6128, Downtown Station, Montréal, Québec, Canada, H3C 3J7. genevieve.mercille.1@umontreal.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Feb;13(2):163-71
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Nutrition Sciences - education
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Energy Intake - physiology
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Prevalence
Quebec
Risk factors
Abstract
To understand more specifically how the quality, quantity and frequency of snack food consumption differs in different BMI categories.
Four hundred and forty-nine school-aged children (grade 4-6) from a Kanien'kehaka (Mohawk) community provided a 24 h recall and their height and weight in 1994, 1998 and 2002, in three independent cross-sectional samples. Food consumed between two consecutive meals was defined as a snacking occasion. ANOVA and chi2 tests were used to compare food choices between BMI categories according to food quality criteria and food groups in 2006. Logistic regression models were performed to compare results between normal-weight children and those at risk of overweight and between normal-weight and overweight children.
Energy intake from snacks tended to be higher for children at risk of overweight, compared with the other two BMI categories. Food groups with a higher energy density were also consumed more frequently by these children, with larger average portions of cereal bars (P
PubMed ID
19650958 View in PubMed
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Assessment of habitual energy and macronutrient intake in adults: comparison of a seven day food record with a dietary history interview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61703
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Feb;56(2):105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
S. Høidrup
A H Andreasen
M. Osler
A N Pedersen
L M Jørgensen
T. Jørgensen
M. Schroll
B L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen County Centre for Preventive Medicine, Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Medical Dept M, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. sh@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Feb;56(2):105-13
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the quantitative agreement between a 7 day food record and a diet history interview when these are conducted under the same conditions and to evaluate whether the two methods assess habitual diet intake differently among subgroups of age and body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Population study, Denmark. SUBJECTS: A total of 175 men and 173 women aged 30-60 y, selected randomly from a larger population sample of Danish adults. INTERVENTIONS: All subjects had habitual diet intake assessed by a diet history interview and completed a 7 day food record within 3 weeks following the interview. The diet history interview and coding of records were performed by the same trained dietician. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Median between-method difference in assessment of total energy intake, absolute intake of macronutrients, and nutrient energy percentages. Difference between reported energy intake from both methods and estimated energy expenditure in different subgroups. RESULTS: Energy and macronutrient intake was assessed slightly higher by the 7 day food record than by the diet history interview, but in absolute terms the differences were negligible. The between-method difference in assessment of total energy intake appeared to be stable over the range of age and BMI in both sexes. As compared to estimated total energy expenditure, both diet assessment methods underestimated energy intake by approximately 20%. For both methods the under-reporting increased by BMI in both sexes and by age in men. CONCLUSIONS: Energy and macronutrient intake data collected under even conditions by either a 7 day food record or a diet history interview may be collapsed and analysed independent of the underlying diet method. Both diet methods, however, appear to underestimate energy intake dependent on age and BMI. SPONSORSHIP: Danish Medical Research Council, the FREJA programme.
PubMed ID
11857043 View in PubMed
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Carbohydrate intake and overweight and obesity among healthy adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150035
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Anwar T Merchant
Hassanali Vatanparast
Shahzaib Barlas
Mahshid Dehghan
Syed Mahboob Ali Shah
Lawrence De Koning
Susan E Steck
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA. anwar.merchant@post.harvard.edu
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1165-72
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Mental Recall
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about the dietary habits of people with optimal body weight in communities with high overweight and obesity prevalence.
To evaluate carbohydrate intake in relation to overweight and obesity in healthy, free-living adults.
We used a cross-sectional analysis.
The Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.2 is a cross-sectional survey of Canadians conducted in 2004-2005. There were 4,451 participants aged 18 years and older with anthropometric and dietary data and no comorbid conditions in this analysis.
Outcome variables were body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) and overweight or obesity status (dichotomous) defined as BMI > or =25 compared with BMI
Notes
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Comment In: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1163-419559131
PubMed ID
19559132 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of high and low energy reporting teenagers and their relationship to low energy reporting mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93009
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Feb;12(2):188-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Vågstrand Karin
Lindroos Anna Karin
Linné Yvonne
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.vagstrand@ki.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Feb;12(2):188-96
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the differences in socio-economic characteristics and body measurements between low, adequate and high energy reporting (LER, AER and HER) teenagers; furthermore, to investigate the relationship to misreporting mothers. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Habitual dietary intake was reported in a questionnaire. Classification into LER, AER and HER using the Goldberg equation within three activity groups based on physical activity questionnaire and calculated BMR. SETTING: Stockholm, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Four hundred and forty-one 16-17-year-old teenagers (57 % girls) and their mothers. RESULT: Of the teenagers, 17-19 % were classified as HER, while 13-16 % as LER. There was a highly significant trend from HER to LER in BMI (P
PubMed ID
18549521 View in PubMed
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Determinants of energy balance and overweight in Finland 1982 and 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210498
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1996 Dec;20(12):1097-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M. Fogelholm
S. Männistö
E. Vartiainen
P. Pietinen
Author Affiliation
UKK Institute, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1996 Dec;20(12):1097-104
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
To study the prevalence of overweight (BMI > 27 kg/m2) and major life-style determinants of energy balance in Finland, in 1982 and 1992.
Cross-sectional study.
640 men and 677 women in 1982, and 664 men and 765 women 1992.
BMI, dietary intake (3 d food record), physical activity and energy expenditure (self-administered questionnaire), data on smoking and educational status.
The prevalence of overweight men was 39% in 1982 and 43% in 1992, and of women 33% and 34%, respectively. In 1992, the reported daily energy intake was 1203 kJ lower in men, and 711 kJ lower in women, compared with 1982 (P
PubMed ID
8968855 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake among under-, normal- and overweight 9- and 15-year-old Estonian and Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78859
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):311-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Villa Inga
Yngve Agneta
Poortvliet Eric
Grjibovski Andrej
Liiv Krystiine
Sjöström Michael
Harro Maarike
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, Tartu, Estonia. Inga.Villa@ut.ee
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):311-22
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Overweight
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thinness - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the differences in macronutrient and food group contribution to total food and energy intakes between Estonian and Swedish under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren, and to estimate the association between diet and body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison between Estonian and Swedish children and adolescents of different BMI groups. SETTING: Twenty-five schools from one region in Estonia and 42 in two regions of central Sweden. SUBJECTS: In total 2308 participants (1176 from Estonia and 1132 from Sweden), including 1141 children with a mean age of 9.6 +/- 0.5 years and 1167 adolescents with a mean age of 15.5 +/- 0.6 years. RESULTS: Overweight was more prevalent among younger girls in Sweden (17.0 vs. 8.9%) and underweight among girls of both age groups in Estonia (7.9 vs. 3.5% in younger and 10.5 vs. 5.1% in older age group of girls). Compared with that of normal- and underweight peers, the diet of overweight Estonian children contained more energy as fat (36.8 vs. 31.7%) but less as carbohydrates, and they consumed more milk and meat products. Absolute BMI of Estonian participants was associated positively with energy consumption from eggs and negatively with energy consumption from sweets and sugar. Swedish overweight adolescents tended to consume more energy from protein and milk products. Risk of being overweight was positively associated with total energy intake and energy from fish or meat products. In both countries the association of overweight and biological factors (pubertal maturation, parental BMI) was stronger than with diet. CONCLUSION: The finding that differences in dietary intake between under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren are country-specific suggests that local dietary habits should be considered in intervention projects addressing overweight.
PubMed ID
17288630 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake and development of a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire for a lifestyle intervention to reduce the risk of chronic diseases in Canadian First Nations in north-western Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159919
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Aug;11(8):831-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Sangita Sharma
Xia Cao
Joel Gittelsohn
Lara S Ho
Elizabeth Ford
Amanda Rosecrans
Stewart Harris
Anthony Jg Hanley
Bernard Zinman
Author Affiliation
Cancer Etiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. gsharma@crch.hawaii.edu
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2008 Aug;11(8):831-40
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Ontario
Questionnaires - standards
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
To characterise the diet of First Nations in north-western Ontario, highlight foods for a lifestyle intervention and develop a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (QFFQ).
Cross-sectional survey using single 24 h dietary recalls.
Eight remote and semi-remote First Nations reserves in north-western Ontario.
129 First Nations (Oji-Cree and Ojibway) men and women aged between 18 and 80 years.
The greatest contributors to energy were breads, pasta dishes and chips (contributing over 20 % to total energy intake). 'Added fats' such as butter and margarine added to breads and vegetables made up the single largest source of total fat intake (8.4 %). The largest contributors to sugar were sugar itself, soda and other sweetened beverages (contributing over 45 % combined). The mean number of servings consumed of fruits, vegetables and dairy products were much lower than recommended. The mean daily meat intake was more than twice that recommended. A 119-item QFFQ was developed including seven bread items, five soups or stews, 24 meat- or fish-based dishes, eight rice or pasta dishes, nine fruits and 14 vegetables. Frequency of consumption was assessed by eight categories ranging from 'Never or less than one time in one month' to 'two or more times a day'.
We were able to highlight foods for intervention to improve dietary intake based on the major sources of energy, fat and sugar and the low consumption of fruit and vegetable items. The QFFQ is being used to evaluate a diet and lifestyle intervention in First Nations in north-western Ontario.
PubMed ID
18062840 View in PubMed
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Eating behaviours, dietary profile and body composition according to dieting history in men and women of the Qu├ębec Family Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179814
Source
Br J Nutr. 2004 Jun;91(6):997-1004
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Véronique Provencher
Vicky Drapeau
Angelo Tremblay
Jean-Pierre Després
Claude Bouchard
Simone Lemieux
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Laval University, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada, G1K 7P4.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2004 Jun;91(6):997-1004
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - psychology
Energy Intake - physiology
Feeding Behavior - physiology - psychology
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to compare eating behaviours (cognitive dietary restraint, disinhibition and susceptibility to hunger), dietary profile and physiological variables according to the practice of dieting: current dieting; history of dieting in the 10-year period that preceded the study; no dieting during the same period. Dieting history, anthropometric markers of adiposity, RMR, dietary profile (3 d food record) and eating behaviours (three-factor eating questionnaire) were determined in a sample of 244 men and 352 women. A greater proportion of women (31.8 %) than men (16.8 %) reported that they had been on a diet over the past 10 years (P=0.0001). In both genders, current and past dieters had a higher BMI (P
PubMed ID
15182403 View in PubMed
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Eating habits in relation to body fatness and gender in adolescents--results from the 'SWEDES' study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80487
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Apr;61(4):517-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Vågstrand K.
Barkeling B.
Forslund H B
Elfhag K.
Linné Y.
Rössner S.
Lindroos A-K
Author Affiliation
M73 Obesity Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. karin.vagstrand@ki.se
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Apr;61(4):517-25
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutrition Physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate if eating habits among adolescents are related to body fatness and gender. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Obesity Unit, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden, 2001-2002. SUBJECTS: Two hundred and seventy-five girls and 199 boys, aged 16-17 years. METHOD: Questionnaires were used for dietary intake and meal frequency, BodPod for measuring body fatness (BF%). In all, 169 girls and 128 boys were classified as adequate reporters (AR) of energy intake, and were used in the dietary analyses. The whole sample was used in the meal frequency analyses. RESULTS: The correlation between reported energy intake and weight in the AR group was 0.23 (P
PubMed ID
17006444 View in PubMed
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Food production and wastage in relation to nutritional intake in a general district hospital--wastage is not reduced by training the staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61640
Source
Clin Nutr. 2003 Feb;22(1):47-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
T. Almdal
L. Viggers
A M Beck
K. Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen Hospital Services, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Clin Nutr. 2003 Feb;22(1):47-51
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Food Handling - statistics & numerical data
Food Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nutrition - physiology
Nutrition Disorders - prevention & control
Nutritional Status - physiology
Personnel, Hospital - education
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Waste Products - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To assess the amount of food produced in a hospital kitchen and the amount wasted. To assess the amount of food eaten by patients in relation to their energy needs. To assess whether the food production and wastage could be reduced by training members of the staff. METHODS: The study was carried out in a general district hospital in Denmark. The amount of food produced in the hospital kitchen and returned uneaten (wasted) was determined. In a representative sample of patients, the energy expenditure was calculated and in the same patients, the energy and protein intake was determined. Following training of the hospital staff the first part was repeated. RESULTS: On average, 11.1 MJ and 112 g of protein were ordered per patient per day. From these amounts on average 3.1 MJ and 33 g protein were wasted per patient per day. The total average energy expenditure was calculated to be 7.5 MJ per patient per day; however, on average, the daily energy intake was only 4.5 MJ and daily protein intake 46 g per patient. Sixty percent of the patients showed evidence of malnutrition as judged from the hospital notes. However, the staff only drew attention to this in 20% of the cases. Following training of the hospital staff, a new investigation showed no significant changes in the amount of food ordered and wasted. CONCLUSION: Despite a supply of food, which was much higher than the patients' needs, the patients have only approx. 60% of their energy need covered. We suggest a reorganization of nutrition in hospitals, so that this is made the responsibility of specific staff members.
PubMed ID
12553949 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.