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Age at onset of anorexia nervosa and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88825
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2009 Jun;18(3):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Papadopoulos Fotios C
Pantziaras Ioannis
Lagiou Pagona
Brandt Lena
Ekselius Lisa
Ekbom Anders
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. fotis.papadopoulos@gmail.com
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2009 Jun;18(3):207-11
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Anorexia Nervosa - complications
Breast Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Caloric Restriction
Child
Cohort Studies
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate breast cancer occurrence among women treated for anorexia nervosa (AN), with emphasis on age at the onset of this disorder. We conducted a register-based retrospective cohort with a total of 6009 women with at least one admission with an AN diagnosis during the period 1973-2003 in Sweden. During a mean follow-up of 13.4 years, information on 80 057 women-years was generated. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR)--the ratio of observed-to-expected number of cases--was used as the measure of relative risk. Overall, 16 women developed breast cancer versus 25.5 expected cases [SIR: 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4-0.9]. Among women who were first admitted for AN between the age of 10 and 24 years, four developed breast cancer versus 11.3 expected (SIR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.1-0.9). In this group of women with early onset AN, only one parous woman developed breast cancer versus 6.3 expected (SIR: 0.2, 95% CI: 0-0.9). Among women first hospitalized for AN between the age of 25 and 40 years, 12 developed breast cancer, whereas the expected number was 14.2, a nonsignificant deficit. Our results suggest that early onset AN may play an important role in the development of breast cancer, possibly because of the extreme restriction of energy intake at a crucial period for mammary gland development. Late onset AN is likely to play a relatively less important role.
PubMed ID
19491607 View in PubMed
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Assessment of habitual energy and macronutrient intake in adults: comparison of a seven day food record with a dietary history interview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61703
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Feb;56(2):105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
S. Høidrup
A H Andreasen
M. Osler
A N Pedersen
L M Jørgensen
T. Jørgensen
M. Schroll
B L Heitmann
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen County Centre for Preventive Medicine, Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Medical Dept M, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. sh@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Feb;56(2):105-13
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the quantitative agreement between a 7 day food record and a diet history interview when these are conducted under the same conditions and to evaluate whether the two methods assess habitual diet intake differently among subgroups of age and body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Population study, Denmark. SUBJECTS: A total of 175 men and 173 women aged 30-60 y, selected randomly from a larger population sample of Danish adults. INTERVENTIONS: All subjects had habitual diet intake assessed by a diet history interview and completed a 7 day food record within 3 weeks following the interview. The diet history interview and coding of records were performed by the same trained dietician. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Median between-method difference in assessment of total energy intake, absolute intake of macronutrients, and nutrient energy percentages. Difference between reported energy intake from both methods and estimated energy expenditure in different subgroups. RESULTS: Energy and macronutrient intake was assessed slightly higher by the 7 day food record than by the diet history interview, but in absolute terms the differences were negligible. The between-method difference in assessment of total energy intake appeared to be stable over the range of age and BMI in both sexes. As compared to estimated total energy expenditure, both diet assessment methods underestimated energy intake by approximately 20%. For both methods the under-reporting increased by BMI in both sexes and by age in men. CONCLUSIONS: Energy and macronutrient intake data collected under even conditions by either a 7 day food record or a diet history interview may be collapsed and analysed independent of the underlying diet method. Both diet methods, however, appear to underestimate energy intake dependent on age and BMI. SPONSORSHIP: Danish Medical Research Council, the FREJA programme.
PubMed ID
11857043 View in PubMed
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Carbohydrate intake and overweight and obesity among healthy adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150035
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Anwar T Merchant
Hassanali Vatanparast
Shahzaib Barlas
Mahshid Dehghan
Syed Mahboob Ali Shah
Lawrence De Koning
Susan E Steck
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA. anwar.merchant@post.harvard.edu
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1165-72
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Mental Recall
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Little is known about the dietary habits of people with optimal body weight in communities with high overweight and obesity prevalence.
To evaluate carbohydrate intake in relation to overweight and obesity in healthy, free-living adults.
We used a cross-sectional analysis.
The Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.2 is a cross-sectional survey of Canadians conducted in 2004-2005. There were 4,451 participants aged 18 years and older with anthropometric and dietary data and no comorbid conditions in this analysis.
Outcome variables were body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) and overweight or obesity status (dichotomous) defined as BMI > or =25 compared with BMI
Notes
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Comment In: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jul;109(7):1163-419559131
PubMed ID
19559132 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of nutrition in persons of older age groups in areas with different patterns of longevity]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62190
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1991 Sep-Oct;(5):24-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu G Grigorov
S G Kozlovskaia
T M Semes'ko
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1991 Sep-Oct;(5):24-32
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Azerbaijan
Comparative Study
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
English Abstract
Georgia (Republic)
Humans
Longevity - physiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition - physiology
Rural Population
Ukraine
Abstract
The study of actual nutrition in old-aged subjects (60-74, 75-89 and 90 years and older) in the regions with varying levels of long-living has revealed different types of nutrition depending on the climatic and geographical zones. The character of nutrition of old-aged in varying regions permits a suggestion on the relation of long-living with low energy requirements that are formed under the influence of ecological conditions (high temperature and humidity of the air in Abkhazia) and determined genetically (Azerbaijan, Ukraine). Alteration of nutrition type according to the environmental requirements (as adaptation to high temperature), decreased energy value of food approaching the nutrition type of the indigenous population (for example, the Azerbaijans and Russians living in Azerbaijan) do not ensure long-living.
PubMed ID
1839097 View in PubMed
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Comparison of energy and nutrient intakes among meals and snacks of adolescent males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174584
Source
Prev Med. 2005 Jul;41(1):203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Nancy K A Stockman
Tanja C Schenkel
Jessica N Brown
Alison M Duncan
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Biology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1.
Source
Prev Med. 2005 Jul;41(1):203-10
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Diet Records
Energy Intake - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Feeding Behavior
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Ontario
Probability
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Eating behaviors developed during adolescence can have immediate health implications and influence future chronic disease risk. The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the distribution of energy and nutrient intakes among meals and snacks, and relate eating occasion frequency to body mass index (BMI) of adolescent males.
Healthy adolescent males (n = 180) completed 3-day food records. Following analysis for energy and nutrient intakes, 3-day averages and frequencies were computed for all meals and snacks.
Dinner was the largest contributor of energy, macronutrients, cholesterol, dietary fiber, and sodium, whereas both dinner and breakfast were the largest contributors of calcium and iron. On average, subjects consumed 1.63 snacks/day, with 77% consuming > or = 1 snack/day. BMI was significantly greater and energy intake was significantly lower in subjects having or = 6 eating occasions/day. The 26% of subjects classified as inconsistent breakfast consumers had significantly higher BMIs and lower iron intakes relative to consistent breakfast consumers.
This study provides valuable information regarding eating occasion frequency and contribution of meals and snacks to energy and nutrient intakes in adolescent males. Such information could be used to improve nutrition education programs for adolescents aimed at chronic disease prevention.
PubMed ID
15917012 View in PubMed
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Consumption of key food items is associated with excess weight among elementary-school-aged children in a Canadian first nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159057
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Feb;108(2):362-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Olivier Receveur
Karimou Morou
Katherine Gray-Donald
Ann C Macaulay
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Olivier.receveur@umontreal.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Feb;108(2):362-6
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body mass index
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet - standards
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
The present analyses aim to identify differences in selected dimensions of diet quality and quantity across body mass index (BMI) categories for Mohawk children in grades 4 through 6 so as to enhance ongoing community intervention strategies within the Kahnawake School Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP). Using 24-hour recalls (n=444), no observable differences in energy intake, percent fat, energy density, or diet diversity across BMI categories were observed. Using a new method, we compared the frequency of use and the amounts consumed for only the most-frequently consumed food items across BMI categories. Compared to normal-weight children, and after adjusting for age, children "at risk of overweight" consume potato chips more frequently (P=0.017) and crackers less frequently (P=0.153), while overweight children consumed larger portions of french fries (P=0.027). We conclude that, in this group of children, consuming slightly more french fries or potato chips than what is already consumed by normal-weight children appears to compromise diet quality as far as overweight is concerned.
PubMed ID
18237583 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake among under-, normal- and overweight 9- and 15-year-old Estonian and Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78859
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):311-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Villa Inga
Yngve Agneta
Poortvliet Eric
Grjibovski Andrej
Liiv Krystiine
Sjöström Michael
Harro Maarike
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Ravila 19, Tartu, Estonia. Inga.Villa@ut.ee
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):311-22
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Overweight
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thinness - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the differences in macronutrient and food group contribution to total food and energy intakes between Estonian and Swedish under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren, and to estimate the association between diet and body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison between Estonian and Swedish children and adolescents of different BMI groups. SETTING: Twenty-five schools from one region in Estonia and 42 in two regions of central Sweden. SUBJECTS: In total 2308 participants (1176 from Estonia and 1132 from Sweden), including 1141 children with a mean age of 9.6 +/- 0.5 years and 1167 adolescents with a mean age of 15.5 +/- 0.6 years. RESULTS: Overweight was more prevalent among younger girls in Sweden (17.0 vs. 8.9%) and underweight among girls of both age groups in Estonia (7.9 vs. 3.5% in younger and 10.5 vs. 5.1% in older age group of girls). Compared with that of normal- and underweight peers, the diet of overweight Estonian children contained more energy as fat (36.8 vs. 31.7%) but less as carbohydrates, and they consumed more milk and meat products. Absolute BMI of Estonian participants was associated positively with energy consumption from eggs and negatively with energy consumption from sweets and sugar. Swedish overweight adolescents tended to consume more energy from protein and milk products. Risk of being overweight was positively associated with total energy intake and energy from fish or meat products. In both countries the association of overweight and biological factors (pubertal maturation, parental BMI) was stronger than with diet. CONCLUSION: The finding that differences in dietary intake between under-, normal- and overweight schoolchildren are country-specific suggests that local dietary habits should be considered in intervention projects addressing overweight.
PubMed ID
17288630 View in PubMed
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A follow-up study of the diet of Finnish diabetic adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224452
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Feb;81(2):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
S M Virtanen
L. Räsänen
R. Tumme
S. Laitinen
J. Mäenpää
M. Virtanen
H K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Feb;81(2):153-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Medicine - standards
Age Factors
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy
Diabetic Diet - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Time Factors
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Changes with age and time in energy-adjusted food consumption and nutrient intake of 74 diabetic subjects initially aged 12-17 years were studied. Food consumption was measured by the 48-h recall method. During the three-year follow-up (from 1985 to 1988), the proportion of carbohydrate of total energy intake decreased from 49% to 47%, that of fat increased from 33% to 36% and that of protein decreased slightly. The densities of fibre and several vitamins decreased in the diet of the diabetic adolescents. These unfavourable changes in the diet of diabetic adolescents took place with increasing age and duration of diabetes, while virtually no changes with time were detected.
PubMed ID
1515760 View in PubMed
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Pelage insulation, litter size, and ambient temperature impact maternal energy intake and offspring development during lactation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97900
Source
Physiol Behav. 2010 May 11;100(2):128-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-2010
Author
Matthew J Paul
Christiana Tuthill
Alexander S Kauffman
Irving Zucker
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655, United States. matthew.paul@umassmed.edu
Source
Physiol Behav. 2010 May 11;100(2):128-34
Date
May-11-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Animals, Newborn - growth & development
Body mass index
Cricetinae
Eating - physiology
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Lactation
Litter Size - physiology
Male
Maternal Behavior - physiology
Phodopus - physiology
Temperature
Abstract
Energy balance during lactation critically influences survival and growth of a mother's offspring, and hence, her reproductive success. Most experiments have investigated the influence of a single factor (e.g., ambient temperature [T(a)] or litter size) on the energetics of lactation. Here, we determined the impact of multiple interventions, including increased conductive heat loss consequent to dorsal fur removal, cold exposure (T(a) of 5 degrees C versus 23 degrees C), and differential lactational load from litters of different sizes (2 or 4 pups), on maternal energy balance and offspring development of Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Lower T(a), fur removal, and larger litters were associated with increased maternal food consumption. Females exposed to multiple challenges (e.g., both fur loss and lower T(a)) ate substantially more food than those exposed to a single challenge, with no apparent ceiling to elevated food intake (increases up to 538%). Thus, energy intake of dams under these conditions does not appear to be limited by feeding behavior or the size of the digestive tract. Housing at 5 degrees C attenuated pup weight gain and increased pup mortality to more than 5 times that of litters housed at 23 degrees C. Increases in the dam's conductive heat loss induced by fur removal did not affect pup weight gain or survival, suggesting that effects of low T(a) on pup weight gain and survival reflect limitations in the pups' ability to ingest or incorporate energy.
PubMed ID
20184907 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.