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Airborne endotoxin in different background environments and seasons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81441
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2006;13(1):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Madsen Anne Mette
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, Lerso Parkalle 105 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. amm@ami.dk
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2006;13(1):81-6
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Denmark
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure
Occupational Health
Reference Standards
Reference Values
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Seasons
Abstract
Endotoxin is a cell wall component from Gram-negative bacteria, and inhaled endotoxin contributes significantly to the induction of airway inflammation and dysfunction. Background levels of endotoxin have not yet been extensively described. In this study, airborne endotoxin was measured with a standardized protocol in 5 types of background environment (169 samples) in Denmark from October to May. Endotoxin levels in a greenhouse (median = 13.2 EU/m3) were significantly higher than in the other environments. The air from biofuel plants (median = 5.3 EU/m3), the air on congested streets (median = 4.4 EU/m3) and on an agricultural field (median = 2.9 EU/m3) had higher endotoxin contents than the air in industrial areas (median = 1.3 EU/m3) or in towns (median = 0.33 EU/m3). Levels in industrial areas were significantly higher than in towns. A literature study revealed background levels of endotoxin on different continents between 0.063-410 EU/m3, with median or mean values between 0.063-3.6 EU/m3. Endotoxin concentrations in towns and industrial areas were higher in April and May than in autumn and winter, and were higher in October than in winter. These data of exposure in background environments and of seasonal variation are helpful for public health practitioners, epidemiologists and industrial hygienists.
PubMed ID
16841877 View in PubMed
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Airborne endotoxin is associated with respiratory illness in the first 2 years of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169949
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Apr;114(4):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Robert Dales
David Miller
Ken Ruest
Mireille Guay
Stan Judek
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Division, Health Canada, Ottawa Hospital (General Campus), 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6, Canada. rdales@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Apr;114(4):610-4
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Child, Preschool
Endotoxins - toxicity
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Prince Edward Island
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced
Abstract
To determine the influence of endotoxin on the incidence of acute respiratory illness during the first 2 years of life, we carried out a longitudinal follow-up study, beginning at birth, of 332 children born in Prince Edward Island, Canada. We measured 5-day averaged air endotoxin in the homes of children, whose parents provided information by daily symptom diaries and twice-monthly telephone contact for up to 2 years. Endotoxin concentration was 0.49 +/- 3.49 EU/m3 (geometric mean +/- geometric SD), and number of annualized illness episodes was 6.83 +/- 2.80 (mean +/- SD). A doubling of the air endotoxin concentration was associated with an increase of 0.32 illness episodes per year (p = 0.0003), adjusted for age, year of study, breast-feeding, environmental tobacco smoke, child care attendance, indoor temperature, and income. Indoor mold surface area and fungal ergosterol were not significantly associated with endotoxin. Airborne endotoxin appears to be a risk factor for clinically symptomatic respiratory illnesses during the first 2 years of life independent of indoor fungus.
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):A30420601319
PubMed ID
16581554 View in PubMed
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Air contaminants in different European farming environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189560
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(1):41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Katja Radon
Brigitta Danuser
Martin Iversen
Eduard Monso
Christoph Weber
Jörg Hartung
Kelley Donham
Urban Palmgren
Dennis Nowak
Author Affiliation
Institute for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Ziemssenstr. 1, D-80336 Munich, Germany. katja.radon@arbeits.med.uni-muenchen.de
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(1):41-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects
Endotoxins - adverse effects
Germany
Housing, Animal
Humans
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Poultry
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Spain
Swine
Switzerland
Abstract
Farmers are known to be at high risk from the development of occupational airway disease. The first stage of the European farmers' study has shown that pig farmers in Denmark and Germany, poultry farmers in Switzerland and greenhouse workers in Spain were at highest risk for work-related respiratory symptoms. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine exposure levels at relevant farm workplaces. Dust and endotoxin levels as well as microbiological concentrations were determined in 213 crop and animal farming environments by personal sampling. The highest total dust concentrations were found in poultry houses in Switzerland with median concentrations of 7.01 mg/m(3). The median airborne endotoxin concentrations in total dust ranged between 0.36 ng/m(3) in Spanish greenhouses and 257.58 ng/m(3) in poultry houses in Switzerland. Likewise, the highest median concentrations of total (2.0 x (7) cells/m(3)) and active fungi (4.4 x (5) cfu/m(3)) have been found in Swiss poultry houses. The predominant fungus taxa discovered in poultry houses were Eurotium spp. and thermophilic fungi. Cladosporium and Botrytis were mainly detected in greenhouses. The exposure level found in this study might put the farmers at risk from respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
12088396 View in PubMed
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Allergens and endotoxin in settled dust from day-care centers and schools in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29525
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
C. Instanes
G. Hetland
S. Berntsen
M. Løvik
P. Nafstad
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. christine.instanes@fhi.no
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides - analysis
Cats
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Dogs
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Glycoproteins - analysis
Humans
Norway
Pyroglyphidae
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Abstract
Allergy to indoor allergens can cause frequent and severe health problems in children. Because little is known about the content of allergens in the indoor environments in Norway, we wanted to assess the levels of cat, dog and mite allergens in schools and day-care centers in Oslo. Allergen levels in dust samples from 155 classrooms and 81 day-care units were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Additionally, we measured the levels of endotoxin in 31 day-care units, using the limulus amebocyte lysate test. Most of the dust samples contained detectable amounts of cat and dog allergens. In mattress and floor dust (day-care centers), and curtain and floor dust (schools) the median Fel d 1 levels were 0.17, 0.002, 0.02 and 0.079 microg/m2, while the median Can f 1 levels were 1.7, 0.03, 0.1 and 0.69 microg/m2, respectively. Levels of cat and dog allergens in school floor dust were associated with the number of pupils with animals at home. In contrast,
PubMed ID
16108908 View in PubMed
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Ambient concentrations of airborne endotoxin in two cities in the interior of British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101885
Source
J Environ Monit. 2011 Mar;13(3):631-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Janice Allen
Karen Bartlett
Mark Graham
Peter Jackson
Author Affiliation
Natural Resources & Environmental Studies Institute, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2011 Mar;13(3):631-40
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - analysis
British Columbia
Cities
Endotoxins - analysis
Particulate Matter - chemistry
Seasons
Weather
Abstract
This study measured and analyzed the outdoor airborne endotoxin concentration, on particulate matter (PM²·5 and PM¹°), for two cities in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. Samples were collected throughout one seasonal cycle, from October 2005 to September 2006. It was found that concentrations were generally highest in the summer and fall, and lowest in the winter and spring. Temperature and relative humidity were found to be most influential, with highest endotoxin concentrations recorded during warm periods and moderate relative humidity (35 to 75 percent). No clear association of concentration with wind direction was observed. Results were comparable between the two cities considered in this study, and concentrations were similar to or slightly higher than those reported by other studies considering urban locations. Endotoxin concentration was also found to be positively associated with agricultural dust sources identified by a source apportionment study conducted at one of the sampling locations.
PubMed ID
21264425 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Endotoxin Adsorption in Two Swedish Patients with Septic Shock.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299700
Source
Blood Purif. 2019; 47 Suppl 3:1-3
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Marcus Ewert Broman
Mikael Bodelsson
Author Affiliation
Perioperative and Intensive Care, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden, marcus.broman@med.lu.se.
Source
Blood Purif. 2019; 47 Suppl 3:1-3
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Endotoxins - blood
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - blood - therapy
Hemofiltration - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Male
Shock, Septic - blood - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
Lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) from the outer Gram-negative bacterial wall can induce a harmful immunologic response, involving hemodynamic deprivation, and is one important motor driving the septic cascade. The positively charged poly-imine ethylene layer on the oXiris membrane is capable of adsorbing negatively charged endotoxin molecules and removing them from the blood compartment. Endotoxin is detrimental and should be removed from blood.
The adsorbable endotoxin fraction in blood arises from a tight balance between seeding from an infectious focus and removal by an overwhelmed immune system. The net sum of remaining endotoxin in blood is available for an adsorption process in the oXiris filter. Endotoxin data from 2 patients with severe Gram-negative septic shock and endotoxemia in this case series, speaks for a considerable share of the adsorption of the oXiris filter in the endotoxin net removal over time. Key Messages: Analysis of combined in vitro and in vivo data speaks for an effect of the oXiris filter in lowering endotoxin.
PubMed ID
30982027 View in PubMed
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[Antibody production in the blood of donors immunized with staphylococcal anatoxin]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57573
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Jan-Feb;(1):109-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
H M Dyzyk
I S Shumeha
A O Tarasenko
V V Patoka
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Jan-Feb;(1):109-12
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - immunology
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis - blood
Antibody Specificity
Blood Donors
Comparative Study
Endotoxins - blood
English Abstract
Humans
Immunization - methods
Phenotype
Staphylococcal Toxoid - immunology
Staphylococcus - immunology
Ukraine
Abstract
Blood serum content was studied of specific antistaphylococcal antibodies (staphylolysins) in 576 donors immunized with staphylococcal anatoxin with the purpose of obtaining an antistaphylococcal plasma and antistaphylococcal immunoglobulin to be used in clinical settings. 292 donors had been immunized and examined prior to 1986, 284--after 1986 (before 1994). Comparison of the immune responses in the above periods of time permitted finding out that 13.03% of immunized donors responded to the antigenic stimulus by such paradoxical reaction as disappearance of specific antibodies; the number of persons-active respondents has gotten reduced from 17.12% to 5.98% as has the number of individuals having the baseline level of staphylolysins (1-2 ME/ml). The changes were at their greatest in donors with group A (II) blood.
PubMed ID
9621632 View in PubMed
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Assessment of particulates and bioaerosols in eastern Canadian sawmills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196695
Source
AIHAJ. 2000 Sep-Oct;61(5):727-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Duchaine
A. Mériaux
P S Thorne
Y. Cormier
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche, Hôpital Laval, Ste Foy, Québec, Canada. duchaine@mediom.qc.ca
Source
AIHAJ. 2000 Sep-Oct;61(5):727-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Canada
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - analysis
Fungi - isolation & purification
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Wood
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to quantify and identify the airborne contamination in eastern Canadian sawmills. Seventeen sawmills were chosen to cover a wide range of size, geographic distribution, and wood species processed. Within each sawmill different work sites (debarking, sawing, sorting, or planing) were studied separately. Area sampling was performed for exposure assessment. Microbial contaminants were assessed with all-glass impingers 30 and six-stage Andersen microbial samplers; appropriate selective media and culture conditions for bacteria, thermophilic actinomycetes, molds, and yeasts were used. Inhalable dust, endotoxins, temperature, and humidity also were measured. Penicillium species were the most predominant molds with up to 40 different Penicillium species identified. Debarking was the working site most highly contaminated by molds, bacteria, and endotoxins (p=0.0001). At this working site mold levels reached a maximum of 1.5 x 10(6) CFU/m3, whereas the median values for culturable bacteria and endotoxin were 21,620 CFU/m3 and 1,081 endotoxin units/m3, respectively. Planing sites were the most highly dust contaminated (median: 3.0 mg/m3) (p
PubMed ID
11071425 View in PubMed
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The association between endotoxin and lung function among children and adolescents living in a rural area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128591
Source
Can Respir J. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):e89-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joshua A Lawson
James A Dosman
Donna C Rennie
Jeremy Beach
Stephen C Newman
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. josh.lawson@usask.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):e89-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cotinine - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Rural Health
Saliva - chemistry
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Vital Capacity
Abstract
BACKGROUND/
Knowledge of the effects of domestic endotoxin on children's lung function is limited. The association between domestic endotoxin and asthma or wheeze and lung function among school-age children (six to 18 years of age) was examined. The interaction between endotoxin and other personal and environmental characteristics and lung function was also assessed.
A case-control study was conducted in and around the rural community of Humboldt, Saskatchewan, between 2005 and 2007. Parents of cases reported either doctor-diagnosed asthma or wheeze in the previous year. Controls were randomly selected from those not reporting these conditions. Data were collected by questionnaire to ascertain symptoms and conditions, while spirometry was used to measure lung function including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Dust collected from the child's play area floor and the child's mattress was used to quantify endotoxin, and saliva was collected to quantify cotinine levels and assess tobacco smoke exposure.
There were 102 cases and 207 controls included in the present study. Lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s was associated with higher mattress endotoxin load among female cases (beta=-0.25, SE=0.07 [P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22187693 View in PubMed
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112 records – page 1 of 12.