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5th Joint meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) and the Lawson Wilkins Society for Pediatric Endocrinology (LWPES). Stockholm, Sweden, June 22-26, 1997. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34454
Source
Horm Res. 1997;48 Suppl 2:1-212
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1997

Aircraft loading and freezer enhancements: lessons for medical research in remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156317
Source
Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug;27(4):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Roy Gagnon
Faith Gagnon
Constadina Panagiotopoulos
Author Affiliation
Endocrinology & Diabetes Unit, BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug;27(4):188-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Canada
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis
Endocrinology
Freezing
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis
Health Services Research
Humans
Meteorological Concepts
Rural Health Services
Specimen Handling - instrumentation
Travel
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), historically extremely rare in children, is becoming prevalent among First Nations children. In Canada, many of these children live in remote villages accessible only by float plane. Because T2D has many long-term health implications, prevention and early identification are critical.
We developed a process for sending a fully equipped endocrinology team to a remote community to screen the children for T2D and IGT. Float plane (sea plane) travel has several unexpected limitations for a medical research team. These include having to travel in good visibility (visual flight rules), limited payload capacity, and restriction against transporting dry ice. The benefits include avoiding the usual security restrictions.
We developed and tested a custom-built insulation jacket and system of backup battery packs for the countertop -25 degrees C freezer (in lieu of dry ice) to transport frozen blood samples from the village to our hospital's laboratory. We also ensured that the five-member research team, its equipment, and the consumable supplies stayed within the maximum takeoff weight of the airplane and met center-of-gravity criteria to ensure a safe flight.
Using the insulated freezer, sample integrity was maintained throughout the flight, and a safe weight-and-balance trip was achieved for the team and supplies. The team obtained complete T2D screening data on 88% of children in the remote community.
PubMed ID
18603216 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ambulatory medical services for patients with diabetes mellitus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103367
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1990;(3):31-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
Ia S Mindlin
A V Utenkov
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1990;(3):31-5
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - therapy
Endocrinology - standards
Family Practice - standards
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
The article submits the results of the study of the organization and quality of care for diabetic patients, the dynamic observation of which at the out-patient establishments is provided by endocrinologists. The total structure of diabetic patients, the follow-up system, the dimensions of screening, the adequacy of treatment are analysed. It is demonstrated that the lack of continuity and interrelation between endocrinologists and district general practitioners in providing care to diabetic patients, the majority of whom have combined pathology, will result in inadequate provision of curative and preventive care to diabetic patients, according to the expert assessment.
PubMed ID
2374943 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can family physicians help patients initiate basal insulin therapy successfully?: randomized trial of patient-titrated insulin glargine compared with standard oral therapy: lessons for family practice from the Canadian INSIGHT trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157747
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;54(4):550-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Stewart Harris
Jean-François Yale
Ellen Dempsey
Hertzel Gerstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Centre for Studies in Family Medicine, University of Western Ontario, 245-100 Collip Circle, London, ON N6G 4X8. sharris1@uwo.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;54(4):550-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Canada
Chronotherapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - psychology
Endocrinology
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Injections
Insulin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Insulin, Long-Acting
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physician's Practice Patterns
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine whether FPs could help patients implement bedtime basal insulin therapy as successfully as diabetes experts could.
National, multicentre, randomized, open-label trial designed to assess use of bedtime basal insulin therapy compared with use of standard oral-agent therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes being treated by diabetes experts or FPs.
Nineteen endocrinologist or expert sites and 34 family practices.
A total of 405 adult patients with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values of 7.5% to 11.0% who were taking 0 to 2 oral agents.
Participants were randomized to receive either basal insulin therapy using glargine self-titrated according to a patient algorithm or conventional therapy with physician-adjusted doses of oral agents for a period of 24 weeks.
The primary outcome was time to achieve 2 consecutive HbA1c values
Notes
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PubMed ID
18411384 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of specialist care within the first year on subsequent outcomes in 24,232 adults with new-onset diabetes mellitus: population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165145
Source
Qual Saf Health Care. 2007 Feb;16(1):6-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
F A McAlister
S R Majumdar
D T Eurich
J A Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Qual Saf Health Care. 2007 Feb;16(1):6-11
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care - standards
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Endocrinology - standards
Female
Humans
Internal Medicine - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - standards
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Proportional Hazards Models
Referral and Consultation
Risk assessment
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Although specialty care has been shown to improve short-term outcomes in patients hospitalised with acute medical conditions, its effect on patients with chronic conditions treated in the ambulatory care setting is less clear.
To examine whether specialty care (ie, consultative care provided by an endocrinologist or a general internist in concert with a patient's primary care doctor) within the first year of diagnosis is associated with improved outcomes after the first year for adults with diabetes mellitus treated as outpatients.
Population-based cohort study using linked administrative data.
The province of Saskatchewan, Canada.
24 232 adults newly diagnosed with diabetes mellitus between 1991 and 2001.
The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Analyses used multivariate Cox proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates, propensity scores and case mix variables (demographic, disease severity and comorbidities). In addition, restriction analyses examined the effect of specialist care in low-risk subgroups.
The median age of patients was 61 years, and over a mean follow-up of 4.9 years 2932 (12%) died. Patients receiving specialty care were younger, had a greater burden of comorbidities, and visited doctors more often before and after their diabetes diagnosis (all p
Notes
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Comment In: Qual Saf Health Care. 2007 Feb;16(1):3-517301193
PubMed ID
17301194 View in PubMed
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The Eli Lilly/EASD research fellowship 1993. D├ęcio L. Eizirik, Uppsala, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48519
Source
Diabetologia. 1993 Oct;36(10):suppl 45-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Source
Diabetologia. 1993 Oct;36(10):suppl 45-6
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
Endocrinology - history
Fellowships and Scholarships
History, 20th Century
Portraits
Sweden
PubMed ID
8243846 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Endocrinological service for children in the Ukrainian SSR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42014
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1977 Mar-Apr;(2):3-5
Publication Type
Article

Hormones for life? Behind the rise and fall of a hormone remedy (Gonadex) against sterility in the Swedish welfare state.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78656
Source
Stud Hist Philos Biol Biomed Sci. 2007 Mar;38(1):191-216
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Nordlund Christer
Author Affiliation
Department of Historical Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. christer.nordlund@histstud.umu.se
Source
Stud Hist Philos Biol Biomed Sci. 2007 Mar;38(1):191-216
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising - history
Animals
Chorionic Gonadotropin - history - therapeutic use
Drug Industry - history
Endocrinology - history
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infertility, Female - drug therapy
Mass Media
Mice
Pregnancy
Social Welfare - history
Sweden
Abstract
In 1948 the pharmaceutical company Leo launched a placental hormonal preparation, called Gonadex, in Sweden. During a press conference, and in commercials and newspapers, it was said that Gonadex could cure sterility as well as many other problems related to the endocrine system. The remedy was described as effective and pure, with no side effects whatsoever. For several reasons, Gonadex was looked upon as a 'Swedish triumph'. Inspired by research on 'mediation', conducted within the field of social studies of pharmaceutical drugs, the present essay explores the political and scientific visions and values behind Gonadex; the propaganda for and marketing of Gonadex; the mediated image of Gonadex in the press; the reception by the medical profession, and finally the hopes and fears of the women who tried (or wanted to try) Gonadex. The essay argues that the public image of Gonadex was 'oversell' of hormone therapy, and that it was shaped by the way endocrinologists at Karolinska Hospital, notably Professor Axel Westman, mediated between Leo, the mass media, and the consumers when, and even before, Gonadex was introduced to the market.
PubMed ID
17324814 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.