Skip header and navigation

Refine By

37 records – page 1 of 4.

Abundance estimate of the Okhotsk Sea population of the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus Linnaeus, 1758).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293453
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Nov; 477(1):236-238
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
O V Shpak
I G Meschersky
D M Kuznetsova
A N Chichkina
A Yu Paramonov
V V Rozhnov
Author Affiliation
Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. ovshpak@gmail.com.
Source
Dokl Biol Sci. 2017 Nov; 477(1):236-238
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Bowhead Whale - genetics - physiology
Endangered Species - statistics & numerical data
Genotype
Siberia
Abstract
Abundance of 388 ± 108 whales for the Okhotsk Sea bowhead whale population based on individual genotyping was estimated using the capture-recapture method for the open population model. The data demonstrate that this endangered population shows no signs of recovery.
Notes
Cites: Genetika. 2014 Apr;50(4):452-63 PMID 25715447
PubMed ID
29299808 View in PubMed
Less detail

An adaptive-management framework for optimal control of hiking near golden eagle nests in Denali National Park.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101839
Source
Conserv Biol. 2011 Apr;25(2):316-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Julien Martin
Paul L Fackler
James D Nichols
Michael C Runge
Carol L McIntyre
Bruce L Lubow
Maggie C McCluskie
Joel A Schmutz
Author Affiliation
Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0485, USA. julienm@ufl.edu
Source
Conserv Biol. 2011 Apr;25(2):316-23
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Decision Making
Eagles
Endangered Species
Models, Theoretical
Recreation
Risk assessment
Uncertainty
Abstract
Unintended effects of recreational activities in protected areas are of growing concern. We used an adaptive-management framework to develop guidelines for optimally managing hiking activities to maintain desired levels of territory occupancy and reproductive success of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in Denali National Park (Alaska, U.S.A.). The management decision was to restrict human access (hikers) to particular nesting territories to reduce disturbance. The management objective was to minimize restrictions on hikers while maintaining reproductive performance of eagles above some specified level. We based our decision analysis on predictive models of site occupancy of eagles developed using a combination of expert opinion and data collected from 93 eagle territories over 20 years. The best predictive model showed that restricting human access to eagle territories had little effect on occupancy dynamics. However, when considering important sources of uncertainty in the models, including environmental stochasticity, imperfect detection of hares on which eagles prey, and model uncertainty, restricting access of territories to hikers improved eagle reproduction substantially. An adaptive management framework such as ours may help reduce uncertainty of the effects of hiking activities on Golden Eagles.
PubMed ID
21342265 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biodiversity conservation and indigenous land management in the era of self-determination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150445
Source
Conserv Biol. 2009 Dec;23(6):1458-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Paige M Schmidt
Markus J Peterson
Author Affiliation
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas A & M University, TAMU 2258, College Station, TX 77843-2258, USA. pmhill@tamu.edu
Source
Conserv Biol. 2009 Dec;23(6):1458-66
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biodiversity
Conservation of Natural Resources
Endangered Species - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Indians, North American
United States
Abstract
Indigenous people inhabit approximately 85% of areas designated for biodiversity conservation worldwide. They also continue to struggle for recognition and preservation of cultural identities, lifestyles, and livelihoods--a struggle contingent on control and protection of traditional lands and associated natural resources (hereafter, self-determination). Indigenous lands and the biodiversity they support are increasingly threatened because of human population growth and per capita consumption. Application of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to tribal lands in the United States provides a rich example of the articulation between biodiversity conservation and indigenous peoples' struggle for self-determination. We found a paradoxical relationship whereby tribal governments are simultaneously and contradictory sovereign nations; yet their communities depend on the U.S. government for protection through the federal-trust doctrine. The unique legal status of tribal lands, their importance for conserving federally protected species, and federal environmental regulations' failure to define applicability to tribal lands creates conflict between tribal sovereignty, self-determination, and constitutional authority. We reviewed Secretarial Order 3206, the U.S. policy on "American Indian tribal rights, federal-tribal trust responsibilities, and the ESA," and evaluated how it influences ESA implementation on tribal lands. We found improved biodiversity conservation and tribal self-determination requires revision of the fiduciary relationship between the federal government and the tribes to establish clear, legal definitions regarding land rights, applicability of environmental laws, and financial responsibilities. Such actions will allow provision of adequate funding and training to tribal leaders and resource managers, government agency personnel responsible for biodiversity conservation and land management, and environmental policy makers. Increased capacity, cooperation, and knowledge transfer among tribes and conservationists will improve biodiversity conservation and indigenous self-determination.
PubMed ID
19508673 View in PubMed
Less detail

CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS IN A WILD FAR EASTERN LEOPARD ( PANTHERA PARDUS ORIENTALIS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295305
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):170-174
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Nadezhda S Sulikhan
Martin Gilbert
Ekaterina Yu Blidchenko
Sergei V Naidenko
Galina V Ivanchuk
Tatiana Yu Gorpenchenko
Mikhail V Alshinetskiy
Elena I Shevtsova
John M Goodrich
John C M Lewis
Mikhail S Goncharuk
Olga V Uphyrkina
Vyatcheslav V Rozhnov
Sergey V Shedko
Denise McAloose
Dale G Miquelle
Author Affiliation
1 Federal Scientific Center of East Asian Terrestrial Biodiversity, Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt 100 letiya Vladivostok 159, Vladivostok, 690022, Russia.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):170-174
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Distemper - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Distemper Virus, Canine
Endangered Species
Female
Panthera - virology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The critically endangered population of Far Eastern leopards ( Panthera pardus orientalis) may number as few as 60 individuals and is at risk from stochastic processes such as infectious disease. During May 2015, a case of canine distemper virus (CDV) was diagnosed in a wild leopard exhibiting severe neurologic disease in the Russian territory of Primorskii Krai. Amplified sequences of the CDV hemagglutinin gene and phosphoprotein gene aligned within the Arctic-like clade of CDV, which includes viruses from elsewhere in Russia, China, Europe, and North America. Histologic examination of cerebral tissue revealed perivascular lymphoid cuffing and demyelination of the white matter consistent with CDV infection. Neutralizing antibodies against CDV were detected in archived serum from two wild Far Eastern leopards sampled during 1993-94, confirming previous exposure in the population. This leopard population is likely too small to maintain circulation of CDV, suggesting that infections arise from spillover from more-abundant domestic or wild carnivore reservoirs. Increasing the population size and establishment of additional populations of leopards would be important steps toward securing the future of this subspecies and reducing the risk posed by future outbreaks of CDV or other infectious diseases.
PubMed ID
29053427 View in PubMed
Less detail

Causes and consequences of fine-scale population structure in a critically endangered freshwater seal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257095
Source
BMC Ecol. 2014;14:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Mia Valtonen
Jukka U Palo
Jouni Aspi
Minna Ruokonen
Mervi Kunnasranta
Tommi Nyman
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland. mia.valtonen@uef.fi.
Source
BMC Ecol. 2014;14:22
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Cluster analysis
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Endangered Species
Female
Finland
Fresh Water
Gene Flow
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Models, Genetic
Population Density
Seals, Earless - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Small, genetically uniform populations may face an elevated risk of extinction due to reduced environmental adaptability and individual fitness. Fragmentation can intensify these genetic adversities and, therefore, dispersal and gene flow among subpopulations within an isolated population is often essential for maintaining its viability. Using microsatellite and mtDNA data, we examined genetic diversity, spatial differentiation, interregional gene flow, and effective population sizes in the critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal (Phoca hispida saimensis), which is endemic to the large but highly fragmented Lake Saimaa in southeastern Finland.
Microsatellite diversity within the subspecies (HE?=?0.36) ranks among the lowest thus far recorded within the order Pinnipedia, with signs of ongoing loss of individual heterozygosity, reflecting very low effective subpopulation sizes. Bayesian assignment analyses of the microsatellite data revealed clear genetic differentiation among the main breeding areas, but interregional structuring was substantially weaker in biparentally inherited microsatellites (FST?=?0.107) than in maternally inherited mtDNA (FST?=?0.444), indicating a sevenfold difference in the gene flow mediated by males versus females.
Genetic structuring in the population appears to arise from the joint effects of multiple factors, including small effective subpopulation sizes, a fragmented lacustrine habitat, and behavioural dispersal limitation. The fine-scale differentiation found in the landlocked Saimaa ringed seal is especially surprising when contrasted with marine ringed seals, which often exhibit near-panmixia among subpopulations separated by hundreds or even thousands of kilometres. Our results demonstrate that population structures of endangered animals cannot be predicted based on data on even closely related species or subspecies.
Notes
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 2001 May;86(Pt 5):609-1711554977
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2006 May;15(6):1561-7616629811
Cites: Genetics. 2003 Mar;163(3):1177-9112663554
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2003 Jun;12(6):1577-8812755885
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2004 Jan 22;20(2):289-9014734327
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2004 Apr;13(4):921-3515012766
Cites: J Hered. 2004 Jul-Aug;95(4):291-30015247308
Cites: Science. 1987 May 15;236(4803):787-923576198
Cites: Genetics. 1989 Feb;121(2):379-912731727
Cites: Genetics. 1992 Jun;131(2):479-911644282
Cites: Nat Genet. 1995 Dec;11(4):360-27493011
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1995 Dec;4(6):653-628564005
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 1996 Apr;76 ( Pt 4):377-838626222
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1996 Feb;5(1):161-39147692
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1997 Jul;6(7):661-69226947
Cites: Anim Genet. 1997 Aug;28(4):310-19345732
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1999 Feb;8(2):299-30710065544
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2005 Apr;14(4):1241-915773950
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2005 Jul;14(8):2611-2015969739
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2011 Mar;20(6):1122-3221251112
Cites: J Evol Biol. 2011 Apr;24(4):871-8621324025
Cites: Mol Ecol Resour. 2011 Jan;11(1):5-1821429096
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2011 Apr;20(8):1601-1121366746
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2012 Sep;21(18):4472-8522882348
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2012 Oct 1;28(19):2537-922820204
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e4348223028456
Cites: J Evol Biol. 2005 Jul;18(4):750-516033545
Cites: BMC Ecol. 2014;14:2225005257
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2006 Jun;15(7):1939-5316689909
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2006 Sep;15(10):2821-3216911203
Cites: Biol Lett. 2006 Jun 22;2(2):316-917148392
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2007 Mar;24(3):621-3117150975
Cites: Oecologia. 2007 Jun;152(3):553-6717505851
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2007 Aug;24(8):1801-1017513881
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Jul 15;23(14):1801-617485429
Cites: Genetics. 2007 Oct;177(2):927-3517720927
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2008 Jul;17(13):3078-9418494764
Cites: J Hered. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):25-3318815116
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2008 Aug;17(15):3428-4719160474
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2008 Sep;17(18):4015-2619238703
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2009 Mar;18(6):1088-9919226320
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2009 May;18(10):2080-3; discussion 2088-9119645078
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2009 Sep;26(9):1963-7319461114
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(5):e1067120498854
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2010 Aug;19(15):3038-5120618697
Cites: Conserv Biol. 2011 Feb;25(1):124-3221166713
Cites: Genetics. 2000 Jun;155(2):945-5910835412
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2001 Feb 7;268(1464):325-3211217905
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2012 Dec;21(23):5689-70122934825
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2013 Feb;22(4):925-4623279006
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Jul 7;280(1762):2013049623677341
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2013 Sep;22(17):4483-9823889682
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(10):e7712524130843
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2013 Nov;22(22):5503-1524128177
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2001 Oct 7;268(1480):2021-711571049
PubMed ID
25005257 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change threatens polar bear populations: a stochastic demographic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100110
Source
Ecology. 2010 Oct;91(10):2883-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Christine M Hunter
Hal Caswell
Michael C Runge
Eric V Regehr
Steve C Amstrup
Ian Stirling
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Wildlife, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA. christine.hunter@alaska.edu
Source
Ecology. 2010 Oct;91(10):2883-97
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Climate change
Ecosystem
Endangered Species
Models, Biological
Population Dynamics
Stochastic Processes
Time Factors
Uncertainty
United States
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice for feeding, breeding, and movement. Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice are forecast to continue because of climate warming. We evaluated the impacts of climate change on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea by means of a demographic analysis, combining deterministic, stochastic, environment-dependent matrix population models with forecasts of future sea ice conditions from IPCC general circulation models (GCMs). The matrix population models classified individuals by age and breeding status; mothers and dependent cubs were treated as units. Parameter estimates were obtained from a capture-recapture study conducted from 2001 to 2006. Candidate statistical models allowed vital rates to vary with time and as functions of a sea ice covariate. Model averaging was used to produce the vital rate estimates, and a parametric bootstrap procedure was used to quantify model selection and parameter estimation uncertainty. Deterministic models projected population growth in years with more extensive ice coverage (2001-2003) and population decline in years with less ice coverage (2004-2005). LTRE (life table response experiment) analysis showed that the reduction in lambda in years with low sea ice was due primarily to reduced adult female survival, and secondarily to reduced breeding. A stochastic model with two environmental states, good and poor sea ice conditions, projected a declining stochastic growth rate, log lambdas, as the frequency of poor ice years increased. The observed frequency of poor ice years since 1979 would imply log lambdas approximately - 0.01, which agrees with available (albeit crude) observations of population size. The stochastic model was linked to a set of 10 GCMs compiled by the IPCC; the models were chosen for their ability to reproduce historical observations of sea ice and were forced with "business as usual" (A1B) greenhouse gas emissions. The resulting stochastic population projections showed drastic declines in the polar bear population by the end of the 21st century. These projections were instrumental in the decision to list the polar bear as a threatened species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.
PubMed ID
21058549 View in PubMed
Less detail

Climate change, tourism and historical grazing influence the distribution of Carex lachenalii Schkuhr - A rare arctic-alpine species in the Tatra Mts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291561
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Mar 15; 618:1628-1637
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-15-2018
Author
Patryk Czortek
Anna Delimat
Marcin K Dyderski
Antoni Zieba
Andrzej M Jagodzinski
Bogdan Jaroszewicz
Author Affiliation
Bialowieza Geobotanical Station, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Sportowa 19, 17-230 Bialowieza, Poland. Electronic address: patrykczortek@biol.uw.edu.pl.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2018 Mar 15; 618:1628-1637
Date
Mar-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Biodiversity
Carex Plant - growth & development
Climate change
Ecosystem
Endangered Species
Herbivory
Poland
Abstract
Mountain vegetation is highly specialized to harsh climatic conditions and therefore is sensitive to any change in environment. The rarest and most vulnerable plants occurring in alpine regions are expected to respond rapidly to environmental changes. An example of such a species is Carex lachenalii subsp. lachenalii Schkuhr, which occurs in Poland on only a few isolated sites in the Tatra Mts. The aim of this study was to assess changes in distribution of C. lachenalii in the Tatra Mts over the past 50-150years and the effects of climate change, tourism and historical grazing on the ecological niche of C. lachenalii. We focused on changes in the importance of functional diversity components in shaping plant species composition. Over the past 50-150years, the elevation of the average distribution of C. lachenalii shifted about 178m upward alongside a significant prolongation of the vegetative season by approximately 20days in the last 50-60years. Species composition of plots without C. lachenalii was characterized by competition between plants, whereas on plots with C. lachenalii habitat filtering was the most important component. Our results suggest that climate change was the main factor driving upward shift of C. lachenalii. Moderate trampling enhanced horizontal spread of this plant, whereas cessation of grazing grazing caused decline of C. lachenalii. The three environmental factors studied that determined shifts in distribution of C. lachenalii may also contribute to changes in distribution of other rare mountain plant species causing changes in ecosystem functioning.
PubMed ID
29054633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Combining geodiversity with climate and topography to account for threatened species richness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288087
Source
Conserv Biol. 2017 Apr;31(2):364-375
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Helena Tukiainen
Joseph J Bailey
Richard Field
Katja Kangas
Jan Hjort
Source
Conserv Biol. 2017 Apr;31(2):364-375
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biodiversity
Conservation of Natural Resources
Endangered Species
Finland
Mammals
Abstract
Understanding threatened species diversity is important for long-term conservation planning. Geodiversity-the diversity of Earth surface materials, forms, and processes-may be a useful biodiversity surrogate for conservation and have conservation value itself. Geodiversity and species richness relationships have been demonstrated; establishing whether geodiversity relates to threatened species' diversity and distribution pattern is a logical next step for conservation. We used 4 geodiversity variables (rock-type and soil-type richness, geomorphological diversity, and hydrological feature diversity) and 4 climatic and topographic variables to model threatened species diversity across 31 of Finland's national parks. We also analyzed rarity-weighted richness (a measure of site complementarity) of threatened vascular plants, fungi, bryophytes, and all species combined. Our 1-km2 resolution data set included 271 threatened species from 16 major taxa. We modeled threatened species richness (raw and rarity weighted) with boosted regression trees. Climatic variables, especially the annual temperature sum above 5 °C, dominated our models, which is consistent with the critical role of temperature in this boreal environment. Geodiversity added significant explanatory power. High geodiversity values were consistently associated with high threatened species richness across taxa. The combined effect of geodiversity variables was even more pronounced in the rarity-weighted richness analyses (except for fungi) than in those for species richness. Geodiversity measures correlated most strongly with species richness (raw and rarity weighted) of threatened vascular plants and bryophytes and were weakest for molluscs, lichens, and mammals. Although simple measures of topography improve biodiversity modeling, our results suggest that geodiversity data relating to geology, landforms, and hydrology are also worth including. This reinforces recent arguments that conserving nature's stage is an important principle in conservation.
PubMed ID
27476459 View in PubMed
Less detail

Conservation genetics of the capercaillie in Poland - Delineation of conservation units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285360
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(4):e0174901
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Robert Rutkowski
Dorota Zawadzka
Ewa Suchecka
Dorota Merta
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(4):e0174901
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breeding
Conservation of Natural Resources
DNA - genetics
Endangered Species
Female
Galliformes - classification - genetics
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Poland
Russia
Sweden
Abstract
The capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) is one of Poland's most endangered bird species, with an estimated population of 380-500 individuals in four isolated areas. To study these natural populations in Poland further, more than 900 non-invasive genetic samples were collected, along with samples from 59 birds representing large, continuous populations in Sweden and Russia; and from two centres in Poland breeding capercaillie. Microsatellite polymorphism at nine loci was then analysed to estimate within-population genetic diversity and genetic differentiation among populations. The results confirmed that isolation of populations and recent decreases in their sizes have reduced genetic diversity among capercaillie in Poland, with all the country's natural populations found to be experiencing the genetic after-effects of demographic bottlenecks. The results of analyses of genetic differentiation and structure further suggest the presence of a 'lowland' cluster (encompassing birds of the Augustowska and Solska Primaeval Forests in Poland, and of Sweden and Russia), and a Carpathian cluster. Capercaillie from Sweden and Russia are also found to differ markedly. The Polish lowland populations seem more closely related to birds from Scandinavia. Our genetic analysis also indicates that the stocks at breeding centres are of a high genetic diversity effectively reflecting the origins of founder individuals, though identification of ancestry requires further study in the case of some birds. Overall, the results sustain the conclusion that the Polish populations of capercaillie from the Carpathians and the lowlands should be treated as independent Management Units (MUs). This is to say that the breeding lines associated with these two sources should be maintained separately at breeding centres. The high level of genetic differentiation of birds from the Solska Primaeval Forest suggests that this population should also be assigned the status of independent MU.
Notes
Cites: Genetics. 1995 Jan;139(1):457-627705646
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2008 Jun 1;24(11):1403-518397895
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2001 Mar;10(3):537-4911298967
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2007 Jul 15;23(14):1801-617485429
Cites: Mol Ecol. 1998 Apr;7(4):453-649628000
Cites: Genetics. 2000 Jun;155(2):945-5910835412
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2003 Jul;12(7):1773-8012803630
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 1994 Oct;9(10):373-521236896
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1994 Apr 12;91(8):3166-708159720
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2000 Nov;9(11):1934-511091338
Cites: Bioinformatics. 2012 Oct 1;28(19):2537-922820204
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2010 Sep;19(18):3845-5220735737
Cites: Genetics. 1978 Jul;89(3):583-9017248844
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2012 Sep;27(9):489-9622727017
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2003 Sep;12(9):2297-30512919469
Cites: Science. 2009 Aug 7;325(5941):710-419661421
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e2360221897847
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2008 Sep;17(18):4015-2619238703
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1978 Jun;75(6):2868-72275857
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2005 Jul;14(8):2611-2015969739
Cites: Heredity (Edinb). 2008 Dec;101(6):475-8218827838
Cites: Mol Ecol Resour. 2008 Jan;8(1):103-621585727
Cites: Evolution. 2006 Nov;60(11):2399-40217236430
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Dec 18;10(12):e014543326682897
Cites: Evolution. 2005 Aug;59(8):1633-816329237
Cites: Mol Ecol. 2001 Feb;10(2):305-1811298947
Cites: Genetics. 1996 Dec;144(4):2001-148978083
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 1999 Aug;14(8):323-32710407432
PubMed ID
28376095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross-Breeding Is Inevitable to Conserve the Highly Inbred Population of Puffin Hunter: The Norwegian Lundehund.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284910
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0170039
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anne Kettunen
Marc Daverdin
Turid Helfjord
Peer Berg
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0170039
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breeding
Dogs
Endangered Species
Female
Founder Effect
Genetic Variation
Inbreeding
Male
Norway
Pedigree
Population Density
Probability
Abstract
The Norwegian Lundehund is a highly endangered native dog breed. Low fertility and high frequency predisposition to intestinal disorder imply inbreeding depression. We assessed the genetic diversity of the Lundehund population from pedigree data and evaluated the potential of optimal contribution selection and cross-breeding in the long-term management of the Lundehund population. The current Norwegian Lundehund population is highly inbred and has lost 38.8% of the genetic diversity in the base population. Effective population size estimates varied between 13 and 82 depending on the method used. Optimal contribution selection alone facilitates no improvement in the current situation in the Lundehund due to the extremely high relatedness of the whole population. Addition of (replacement with) 10 breeding candidates of foreign breed to 30 Lundehund breeders reduced the parental additive genetic relationship by 40-42% (48-53%). Immediate actions are needed to increase the genetic diversity in the current Lundehund population. The only option to secure the conservation of this rare breed is to introduce individuals from foreign breeds as breeding candidates.
Notes
Cites: J Hered. 2015 Jul-Aug;106(4):403-625994807
Cites: J Anim Breed Genet. 2009 Aug;126(4):327-3219630884
Cites: Genet Sel Evol. 2008 Jul-Aug;40(4):359-7818558071
Cites: J Anim Breed Genet. 2006 Feb;123(1):1-916420259
Cites: J Anim Breed Genet. 2011 Feb;128(1):56-6321214645
Cites: Anim Genet. 2009 Jun;40(3):323-3219222437
Cites: Genetics. 2008 May;179(1):593-60118493074
Cites: Genet Mol Biol. 2010 Oct;33(4):657-6221637574
Cites: Canine Genet Epidemiol. 2015 Sep 21;2:1326401341
Cites: J Anim Breed Genet. 2010 Aug;127(4):318-2620646119
Cites: J Anim Sci. 2013 Nov;91(11):5122-723989866
Cites: Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand A. 1984 Sep;92(5):353-626507100
Cites: J Anim Breed Genet. 2016 Oct;133(5):375-8326927793
Cites: Genet Res. 2000 Jun;75(3):331-4310893869
Cites: Anim Genet. 2014 Feb;45(1):15423992148
Cites: Genet Sel Evol. 2003 Jan-Feb;35(1):43-6312605850
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Apr 10;10(4):e012268025860808
Cites: Anim Genet. 2013 Jun;44(3):348-5122988964
Cites: Genet Sel Evol. 2015 Mar 28;47:2125887703
Cites: J Anim Breed Genet. 2014 Apr;131(2):153-6224289536
Cites: J Anim Breed Genet. 2005 Jun;122(3):172-616130468
PubMed ID
28107382 View in PubMed
Less detail

37 records – page 1 of 4.