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A 5-year prospective study of predictors for disability pension among patients with major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129883
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
I A K Holma
K M Holma
T K Melartin
H J Rytsälä
E T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Mood, Depression, and Suicidal Behaviour Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
There is a scarcity of prospective long-term studies on work disability caused by depression. We investigated predictors for disability pension among psychiatric patients with MDD.
The Vantaa Depression Study followed up prospectively 269 psychiatric in- and out-patients with DSM-IV MDD for 5 years with a life chart, including 230 (91.3%) patients belonging to labour force. Information on disability pensions was obtained from interviews, patient records and registers.
Within 5 years, 20% of the patients belonging to labour force at baseline were granted a disability pension. In multivariate analyses, the significant baseline predictors for granted disability pension were age =50 years (HR = 3.91, P
PubMed ID
22054701 View in PubMed
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10-year trends of educational differences in long sickness absence due to mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285500
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2017
Author
Hilla Sumanen
Olli Pietiläinen
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Date
Jul-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education - classification - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental disorders are a key cause of sickness absence (SA) and challenge prolonging working careers. Thus, evidence on the development of SA trends is needed. In this study, educational differences in long SAs due to mental disorders were examined in two age groups among employees of the City of Helsinki from 2004 to 2013.
All permanently and temporarily employed staff aged 18-34 and 35-49 were included in the analyses (n=~27800 per year). SA spells of =14 days due to mental disorders were examined annually. Education was classified to higher and lower levels. Joinpoint regression was used to identify major turning points in SA trends.
Joinpoint regression models showed that lower educated groups had more long SAs spells due to mental disorders than those groups with higher education. SA trends decreased during the study period in all studied age and educational groups. Lower educated age groups had similar SA trends. Younger employees with higher education had the fewest SAs.
A clear educational gradient was found in long SAs due to mental disorders during the study period. SA trends decreased from 2004 to 2013.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28496028 View in PubMed
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Accounting for Irish Catholic ill health in Scotland: a qualitative exploration of some links between 'religion', class and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179028
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Patricia Walls
Rory Williams
Author Affiliation
MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow. WallsAMP@aol.com
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Catholicism - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Prejudice
Protestantism - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Scotland - epidemiology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options. The paper considers whether the competence of Catholics or Catholic cultural factors are implicated in thwarting social mobility among Catholics or, alternatively, whether institutional sectarianism is involved. We conclude that, of these options, theories of institutional sectarianism provide the hypothesis which currently best fits these data. In Glasgow, people of indigenous Irish descent are recognisable from their names and Catholic background and are identified as Catholic by others. Overt historical exclusion of Catholics from middle class employment options now seems to take unrecognised forms in routine assumptions and practices which restrict Catholic employment opportunities. It is argued that younger Catholics use education to overcome the obstacles to mobility faced by older people and circumvent exclusions by recourse to middle class public-sector employment. This paper aims to link historical, structural and sectarian patterns of employment experience to accounts of health and work, and in so doing to contribute to an explanation for the relatively poor health of Catholic Glaswegians with Irish roots.
PubMed ID
15283776 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and associations with psychosocial work characteristics. A comparative study of Swedish and Danish gainfully employed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120883
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jul;149(1-3):38-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Linda L Magnusson Hanson
Ida E H Madsen
Hugo Westerlund
Töres Theorell
Hermann Burr
Reiner Rugulies
Author Affiliation
Research division of epidemiology, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. linda.hanson@stressforskning.su.se
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jul;149(1-3):38-45
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Social Adjustment
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although depression is common, prevalence estimates of antidepressant use among the workforce and undisputed evidence relating psychosocial work characteristics to depression is scarce. This study cross-sectionally assesses the prevalence of antidepressant use among employed in Sweden and Denmark and prospectively examines associations between work characteristics and antidepressant use.
Data on work demands, influence and learning possibilities was collected 2005-2006 from two representative samples of employed aged 20-59 years from Sweden (n=4351) and Denmark (n=8064) and linked to purchases of antidepressants through national prescription drug registries. Standardized 12-month prevalences were calculated. Cox regressions on work characteristics and incident use were performed separately and estimates pooled.
Employed Swedish residents had higher standardized prevalence than Danish, 6.0% compared to 5.0%. Working fast and conflicting demands were associated with incident use when estimates were pooled, but adjustment for baseline health attenuated these estimates. Emotionally disturbing situations were related to any incident use, and more strongly to use >179 defined daily dosages/year, even after adjustment for various covariates.
Statistics based on national prescription drug registries are influenced by, e.g., treatment seeking behaviours and other reasons for prescription than depression. Selective drop-out may also affect prevalence estimates.
The study indicates that use of antidepressants among the workforce is relatively high and that employed Swedish residents had higher prevalence of antidepressant use than Danish. Relationships between work characteristics and antidepressant use were, however, similar with emotional demands showing the strongest association, indicating that particular groups of employees may be at increased risk.
PubMed ID
22959681 View in PubMed
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Are fatigue, depression and anxiety associated with labour market participation among patients diagnosed with haematological malignancies? A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269147
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Apr;24(4):408-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Trine A Horsboel
Ute Bültmann
Claus V Nielsen
Bendt Nielsen
Niels T Andersen
Annette de Thurah
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Apr;24(4):408-15
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mental Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Return to Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of this study are to examine levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety following diagnosis of a haematological malignancy, to determine the incidence of return to work (RTW) and long-term sickness absence (LTSA) during 1-year follow-up and to examine whether fatigue, depression and anxiety are associated with RTW and LTSA in this group of cancer patients.
Questionnaire-based data on fatigue, depression and anxiety were obtained at baseline. In all, 196 patients returned the questionnaire. Of these, 106 patients were on sick leave and 90 patients were working. They were all followed prospectively for 1 year using register-based data on labour market participation.
At baseline, high levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were more prevalent among sickness absent patients than in those working. Half of the sickness absent patients returned to work during follow-up, and only 10 (11%) working patients experienced LTSA. Sickness absent patients with highest scores of physical fatigue were less likely to RTW than those with lowest scores (RRadj 0.43, 95% CI 0.23-0.78). Similar, we found an association between symptoms of anxiety and RTW (p?=?0.048). This association was though non-significant in multivariable analyses (p?=?0.068). No significant association was found between depression and RTW.
Half of sickness absent patients returned to work, and only a few of working patients experienced LTSA during follow-up. Patients reporting high levels of physical fatigue were less likely to RTW. There was a similar tendency for anxiety, whereas we found no association between depression and RTW. Larger prospective studies are needed.
PubMed ID
25174733 View in PubMed
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Associations between sickness absence and harassment, threats, violence, or discrimination: a cross-sectional study of the Swedish Police.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124022
Source
Work. 2012;42(1):83-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Pia Svedberg
Kristina Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Pia.Svedberg@ki.se
Source
Work. 2012;42(1):83-92
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Age Distribution
Bullying - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dominance-Subordination
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Police
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Sexual Harassment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data - trends
Social Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To study if sick leave among employees in the Swedish Police was associated with experiences of discrimination, harassment, or (threats of) violence.
All employees in the Swedish Police in 2005.
Analyses of data from a questionnaire to all employees; 74% (n=16,725) responded. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) between sick leave and the studied factors were assessed.
The rate of sickness absence was higher for women (12%) than for men (8%) (p
PubMed ID
22635152 View in PubMed
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Source
J Lesbian Stud. 2008;12(1):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jukka Lehtonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland. jukka.p.lehtonen@helsinki.fi
Source
J Lesbian Stud. 2008;12(1):97-102
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Homosexuality, Female - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Job Description
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Social Perception
Women, Working - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
I focus on lesbian women's career choices and analyse how they explain their choices in relation to their sexuality. In addition to personal accounts and experiences, I use survey data that shows that several factors influence lesbian women's occupational circumstances. The Sexual Minority Survey included 726 respondents, of which 415 are women. The survey was conducted as part of the project Sexual and Gender Minorities at Work. Although many lesbian women claim that their sexuality did not influence their career choices, their career choice processes seem to be linked in many ways with sexuality, gender, and heteronormativity in society.
PubMed ID
19042296 View in PubMed
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Career maturity: a latent means and covariance structure analysis of Daidalos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90292
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2009 Apr;50(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Dybwad Tom-Erik
Author Affiliation
The Regional University of Bodø, Norway. tom-erik.dybwad@hibo.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2009 Apr;50(2):109-20
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude
Career Choice
Decision Making - physiology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Self Concept
Sex Distribution
Social Support
Uncertainty
Young Adult
Abstract
A latent means and covariance structure analysis was conducted to assess the construct validity and construct comparability in the measuring of career maturity across boys and girls. The career maturity inventory has been coined Daidalos. The sample consisted of 2,443 high school students recruited from one county in Norway. Of these, 1,132 were males, and 1,311 were females. The mean age of the participants was 17 years of age. Goodness-of-fit statistics provided support for a five-factor first-order model in which the factor loadings, factor covariances and item intercepts were invariant across groups. Additionally, deltaS-B chi2 was shown to be non-significant for the testing of invariance of the measurement model. Three significant differences in latent means were detected, with boys scoring higher on negative attitudes toward school or dropout intentions, and girls scoring higher on career uncertainty and need for world-of-work information.
PubMed ID
19170969 View in PubMed
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Changes in occupational mental and physical health and health symptoms during the economic recession.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286868
Source
Work. 2017;56(4):603-615
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Hjördís Sigursteinsdóttir
Gudbjörg Linda Rafnsdóttir
Gudbjörg Andrea Jónsdóttir
Source
Work. 2017;56(4):603-615
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Economic Recession
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Downsizing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
School Teachers - statistics & numerical data
Sex Characteristics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
In 2008, many Western countries faced a great economic recession, the result of which was increased unemployment and reduced public expenditure.
This article focuses on changes in the self-reported mental and physical health and health symptoms of the remaining employees of Icelandic municipalities who worked within the educational system and the care service during the economic recession. We examine gender differences in health and differences between downsized workplaces and workplaces where no downsizing occurred and differences between workplaces with heavy workload and light workload.
The study is based on a balanced panel online survey and focus groups.
The main finding is that both the mental and physical health of employees deteriorated year by year between 2010, 2011 and 2013 in all workplaces although the downsized workplaces and workplaces with heavy workloads fared worse. At the same time, public expenditure on the health care system was reduced.
We hope that our results encourage further studies in the field and that they will be taken into account when dealing with prevention and rehabilitation initiatives.
PubMed ID
28372340 View in PubMed
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Childhood and persistent ADHD symptoms associated with educational failure and long-term occupational disability in adult ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260872
Source
Atten Defic Hyperact Disord. 2014 Jun;6(2):87-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Mats Fredriksen
Alv A Dahl
Egil W Martinsen
Ole Klungsoyr
Stephen V Faraone
Dawn E Peleikis
Source
Atten Defic Hyperact Disord. 2014 Jun;6(2):87-99
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Educational Status
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Symptom Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have examined the impact of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms on adult ADHD functional outcomes. To address this issue dimensionally, ADHD symptoms in childhood and adulthood and their relation to educational deficits and work disability are studied in a clinical sample of adult patients with previously untreated ADHD. About 250 adults diagnosed systematically with ADHD according to DSM-IV were prospectively recruited. Primary outcomes were high school dropout and being out of the work last year. Childhood ADHD symptoms, sex differences, comorbidities of other mental disorders, and adult ADHD symptoms were examined by historical data, clinician interviews, and questionnaires. High levels of ADHD symptom severity in childhood were related to dropping out of high school [odds ratio (OR) = 3.0], as were higher numbers of hyperactive-impulsive symptoms in childhood. Significantly, more women than men were long-term work disabled (OR = 2.0). After adjusting for age and gender, persisting high levels of ADHD inattention symptoms in adulthood (OR = 2.5), number of comorbid disorders, and particularly anxiety disorders were significantly related to long-term work disability. Childhood hyperactive-impulsive symptoms and overall severity of childhood ADHD symptoms were associated with high school dropout rates; however, persisting ADHD inattention symptoms and comorbid mental disorders in adulthood were more correlated to occupational impairment. These findings underline proposals for studies on early recognition and interventions for ADHD and psychiatric comorbidity. They further suggest that inattentive symptoms be a focus of adult ADHD treatment and that workplace interventions be considered to prevent long-term work disability.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24497125 View in PubMed
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99 records – page 1 of 10.