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A 5-year prospective study of predictors for disability pension among patients with major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129883
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
I A K Holma
K M Holma
T K Melartin
H J Rytsälä
E T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Mood, Depression, and Suicidal Behaviour Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2012 Apr;125(4):325-34
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - physiopathology - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Abstract
There is a scarcity of prospective long-term studies on work disability caused by depression. We investigated predictors for disability pension among psychiatric patients with MDD.
The Vantaa Depression Study followed up prospectively 269 psychiatric in- and out-patients with DSM-IV MDD for 5 years with a life chart, including 230 (91.3%) patients belonging to labour force. Information on disability pensions was obtained from interviews, patient records and registers.
Within 5 years, 20% of the patients belonging to labour force at baseline were granted a disability pension. In multivariate analyses, the significant baseline predictors for granted disability pension were age =50 years (HR = 3.91, P
PubMed ID
22054701 View in PubMed
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10-year trends of educational differences in long sickness absence due to mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285500
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2017
Author
Hilla Sumanen
Olli Pietiläinen
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Source
J Occup Health. 2017 Jul 27;59(4):352-355
Date
Jul-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education - classification - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental disorders are a key cause of sickness absence (SA) and challenge prolonging working careers. Thus, evidence on the development of SA trends is needed. In this study, educational differences in long SAs due to mental disorders were examined in two age groups among employees of the City of Helsinki from 2004 to 2013.
All permanently and temporarily employed staff aged 18-34 and 35-49 were included in the analyses (n=~27800 per year). SA spells of =14 days due to mental disorders were examined annually. Education was classified to higher and lower levels. Joinpoint regression was used to identify major turning points in SA trends.
Joinpoint regression models showed that lower educated groups had more long SAs spells due to mental disorders than those groups with higher education. SA trends decreased during the study period in all studied age and educational groups. Lower educated age groups had similar SA trends. Younger employees with higher education had the fewest SAs.
A clear educational gradient was found in long SAs due to mental disorders during the study period. SA trends decreased from 2004 to 2013.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Jun 25;9(6):e9986924963812
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Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2017 Jan;59(1):114-11928045805
PubMed ID
28496028 View in PubMed
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Accounting for Irish Catholic ill health in Scotland: a qualitative exploration of some links between 'religion', class and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179028
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Patricia Walls
Rory Williams
Author Affiliation
MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow. WallsAMP@aol.com
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Catholicism - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Prejudice
Protestantism - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Scotland - epidemiology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options. The paper considers whether the competence of Catholics or Catholic cultural factors are implicated in thwarting social mobility among Catholics or, alternatively, whether institutional sectarianism is involved. We conclude that, of these options, theories of institutional sectarianism provide the hypothesis which currently best fits these data. In Glasgow, people of indigenous Irish descent are recognisable from their names and Catholic background and are identified as Catholic by others. Overt historical exclusion of Catholics from middle class employment options now seems to take unrecognised forms in routine assumptions and practices which restrict Catholic employment opportunities. It is argued that younger Catholics use education to overcome the obstacles to mobility faced by older people and circumvent exclusions by recourse to middle class public-sector employment. This paper aims to link historical, structural and sectarian patterns of employment experience to accounts of health and work, and in so doing to contribute to an explanation for the relatively poor health of Catholic Glaswegians with Irish roots.
PubMed ID
15283776 View in PubMed
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Acknowledging and adapting to dietetic students' changing needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155255
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):126-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Daphne Lordly
Debbie MacLellan
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):126-30
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Communication
Dietetics - economics - education
Employment - psychology
Female
Humans
Internship, Nonmedical
Male
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological
Students - psychology
Abstract
Various societal influences have shaped the way dietetic students view and react to current educational situations. Students' perspectives were sought on conditions that caused stress in the educational environment, what they thought educators did not understand about them, and changes their faculty or preceptors had made to address their needs.
Third- and fourth-year university students, interns in their final rotations, and master's degree students completed a questionnaire (n=284).
Several stressors were identified: thinking about getting a job as a dietitian, lack of finances or debt, competing for internship positions, the ability to meet program demands, and envisioning the area in which they would specialize. The qualitative analysis highlighted gaps in understanding between students and educators. Gaps concerned student finances, the evaluation process, inflexible undergraduate and internship structures, competition among students, ineffective communication, and finding a balance between academics and other competing interests.
A conflict exists between what students expect as part of their educational experience and what they actually experience. Students appreciated educators who engaged them in the learning process and recognized the realities of their lives.
PubMed ID
18783637 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of parental employment and parenting: connections to adolescents' well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179988
Source
J Adolesc. 2004 Jun;27(3):221-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Marjukka Sallinen
Ulla Kinnunen
Anna Rönkä
Author Affiliation
Family Research Unit, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box. 35, Agora 40014, Finland. marjukka.sallinen@psyka.jyu.fi
Source
J Adolesc. 2004 Jun;27(3):221-37
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Depression - psychology
Educational Status
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Perception
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
This paper examines whether the relationship between parental work and adolescents' well-being would be mediated through parenting behaviour. The primary focus was on the experiences of adolescents. Questionnaire-based data from families (both parents and one children, n = 77) and adolescents (n = 126) were collected in Finland in 2000 and 2001, respectively. The adolescents were on average 14 years old. Results showed that the relationships between parents' negative work experiences and adolescents' depression (all perceived by adolescents) were partially mediated by adolescents' experience of lessened autonomy granting in parenting and increased conflicts between parents and adolescents. In addition, the relations between fathers' negative work experiences and adolescents' negative attitude regarding school (all reported by adolescents) were mediated by adolescents' perceptions of increased conflicts between fathers and adolescents.
PubMed ID
15159085 View in PubMed
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Adverse trajectories of mental health problems predict subsequent burnout and work-family conflict - a longitudinal study of employed women with children followed over 18 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282979
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-08-2016
Author
Wendy Nilsen
Anni Skipstein
Evangelia Demerouti
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Date
Nov-08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Conflict (Psychology)
Employment - psychology
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
The long-term consequence of experiencing mental health problems may lead to several adverse outcomes. The current study aims to validate previous identified trajectories of mental health problems from 1993 to 2006 in women by examining their implications on subsequent work and family-related outcomes in 2011.
Employed women (n?=?439) with children were drawn from the Tracking Opportunities and Problems-Study (TOPP), a community-based longitudinal study following Norwegian families across 18 years. Previous identified latent profiles of mental health trajectories (i.e., High; Moderate; Low-rising and Low levels of mental health problems over time) measured at six time points between 1993 and 2006 were examined as predictors of burnout (e.g., exhaustion and disengagement from work) and work-family conflict in 2011 in univariate and multivariate analyses of variance adjusted for potential confounders (age, job demands, and negative emotionality).
We found that having consistently High and Moderate symptoms as well as Low-Rising symptoms from 1993 to 2006 predicted higher levels of exhaustion, disengagement from work and work-family conflict in 2011. Findings remained unchanged when adjusting for several potential confounders, but when adjusting for current mental health problems only levels of exhaustion were predicted by the mental health trajectories.
The study expands upon previous studies on the field by using a longer time span and by focusing on employed women with children who experience different patterns of mental health trajectories. The long-term effect of these trajectories highlight and validate the importance of early identification and prevention in women experiencing adverse patterns of mental health problems with regards to subsequent work and family-related outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27825325 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and misuse: what are the contributions of occupation and work organization conditions?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155014
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:333
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Alain Marchand
Author Affiliation
School of Industrial Relations, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. alain.marchand@umontreal.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2008;8:333
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology
Employment - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - classification
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This research examines the specific contribution of occupation and work organization conditions to alcohol use and misuse. It is based on a social-action model that takes into account agent personality, structures of daily life, and macro social structures.
Data come from a representative sample of 10,155 workers in Quebec, Canada. Multinomial regression models corrected for sample design effect have been used to predict low-risk and high-risk drinking compared to non-drinkers. The contribution of occupation and work organization conditions (skill used, decision authority, physical and psychological demands, hours worked, irregular work schedule, harassment, unionization, job insecurity, performance pay, prestige) have been adjusted for family situation, social network outside the workplace, and individual characteristics.
Compared to non-qualified blue-collars, both low-risk and high-risk drinking are associated with qualified blue-collars, semi-qualified white-collars, and middle managers; high-risk drinking is associated with upper managers. For constraints-resources related to work organization conditions, only workplace harassment is an important determinant of both low-risk and high-risk drinking, but it is modestly moderated by occupation. Family situation, social support outside work, and personal characteristics of individuals are also associated with alcohol use and misuse. Non-work factors mediated/suppressed the role of occupation and work organization conditions.
Occupation and workplace harassment are important factors associated with alcohol use and misuse. The results support the theoretical model conceptualizing alcohol use and misuse as being the product of stress caused by constraints and resources brought to bear simultaneously by agent personality, structures of daily life, and macro social structures. Occupational alcohol researchers must expand their theoretical perspectives to avoid erroneous conclusions about the specific role of the workplace.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18816388 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and associations with psychosocial work characteristics. A comparative study of Swedish and Danish gainfully employed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120883
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jul;149(1-3):38-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Linda L Magnusson Hanson
Ida E H Madsen
Hugo Westerlund
Töres Theorell
Hermann Burr
Reiner Rugulies
Author Affiliation
Research division of epidemiology, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. linda.hanson@stressforskning.su.se
Source
J Affect Disord. 2013 Jul;149(1-3):38-45
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Registries
Social Adjustment
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although depression is common, prevalence estimates of antidepressant use among the workforce and undisputed evidence relating psychosocial work characteristics to depression is scarce. This study cross-sectionally assesses the prevalence of antidepressant use among employed in Sweden and Denmark and prospectively examines associations between work characteristics and antidepressant use.
Data on work demands, influence and learning possibilities was collected 2005-2006 from two representative samples of employed aged 20-59 years from Sweden (n=4351) and Denmark (n=8064) and linked to purchases of antidepressants through national prescription drug registries. Standardized 12-month prevalences were calculated. Cox regressions on work characteristics and incident use were performed separately and estimates pooled.
Employed Swedish residents had higher standardized prevalence than Danish, 6.0% compared to 5.0%. Working fast and conflicting demands were associated with incident use when estimates were pooled, but adjustment for baseline health attenuated these estimates. Emotionally disturbing situations were related to any incident use, and more strongly to use >179 defined daily dosages/year, even after adjustment for various covariates.
Statistics based on national prescription drug registries are influenced by, e.g., treatment seeking behaviours and other reasons for prescription than depression. Selective drop-out may also affect prevalence estimates.
The study indicates that use of antidepressants among the workforce is relatively high and that employed Swedish residents had higher prevalence of antidepressant use than Danish. Relationships between work characteristics and antidepressant use were, however, similar with emotional demands showing the strongest association, indicating that particular groups of employees may be at increased risk.
PubMed ID
22959681 View in PubMed
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Are fatigue, depression and anxiety associated with labour market participation among patients diagnosed with haematological malignancies? A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269147
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Apr;24(4):408-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Trine A Horsboel
Ute Bültmann
Claus V Nielsen
Bendt Nielsen
Niels T Andersen
Annette de Thurah
Source
Psychooncology. 2015 Apr;24(4):408-15
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mental Fatigue - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Return to Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of this study are to examine levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety following diagnosis of a haematological malignancy, to determine the incidence of return to work (RTW) and long-term sickness absence (LTSA) during 1-year follow-up and to examine whether fatigue, depression and anxiety are associated with RTW and LTSA in this group of cancer patients.
Questionnaire-based data on fatigue, depression and anxiety were obtained at baseline. In all, 196 patients returned the questionnaire. Of these, 106 patients were on sick leave and 90 patients were working. They were all followed prospectively for 1 year using register-based data on labour market participation.
At baseline, high levels of fatigue, depression and anxiety were more prevalent among sickness absent patients than in those working. Half of the sickness absent patients returned to work during follow-up, and only 10 (11%) working patients experienced LTSA. Sickness absent patients with highest scores of physical fatigue were less likely to RTW than those with lowest scores (RRadj 0.43, 95% CI 0.23-0.78). Similar, we found an association between symptoms of anxiety and RTW (p?=?0.048). This association was though non-significant in multivariable analyses (p?=?0.068). No significant association was found between depression and RTW.
Half of sickness absent patients returned to work, and only a few of working patients experienced LTSA during follow-up. Patients reporting high levels of physical fatigue were less likely to RTW. There was a similar tendency for anxiety, whereas we found no association between depression and RTW. Larger prospective studies are needed.
PubMed ID
25174733 View in PubMed
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Are job strain and sleep disturbances prognostic factors for low-back pain?A cohort study of a general population of working age in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289465
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2017 Jul 07; 49(7):591-597
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-07-2017
Author
Eva Rasmussen-Barr
Wilhelmus J A Grooten
Johan Hallqvist
Lena W Holm
Eva Skillgate
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physio-therapy, Karolinska Institutet, SE-112 28 Stockholm, Sweden. eva.rasmussen.barr@ki.se.
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2017 Jul 07; 49(7):591-597
Date
Jul-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Employment - psychology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sleep Wake Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether job strain, i.e. a combination of job demands and decision latitude (job control), and sleep disturbances among persons with occasional low-back pain are prognostic factors for developing troublesome low-back pain; and to determine whether sleep disturbances modify the potential association between job strain and troublesome low-back pain. A population-based cohort from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort surveys in 2006 and 2010 (=?25,167) included individuals with occasional low-back pain at baseline 2006 (=?6,413). Through logistic regression analyses, potential prognostic effects of job strain and sleep disturbances were studied. Stratified analyses were performed to assess modification of sleep disturbances on the potential association between job strain and troublesome low-back pain. Those exposed to job strain; active job (odds ratio (OR) 1.3, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-1.6), or high strain (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.9-2.4) and those exposed to severe sleep disturbances (OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.3-4.0), but not those exposed to passive jobs (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.9-1.4) had higher odds of developing troublesome low-back pain. Sleep disturbances did not modify the association between job strain and troublesome low-back pain. These findings indicate that active job, high job strain and sleep disturbances are prognostic factors for troublesome low-back pain. The odds of developing troublesome low-back pain due to job strain were not modified by sleep disturbance.
PubMed ID
28657642 View in PubMed
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