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The 1999 National Caring Awards. Young adult awardees--Aubyn Burnside, Hickory, North Carolina.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198758
Source
Caring. 1999 Dec;18(12):42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999

The 1999 National Caring Awards. Young adult awardees--Craig Kielburger, Concord, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198759
Source
Caring. 1999 Dec;18(12):36-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999

Ability to solve problems, professionalism, management, empathy, and working capacity in occupational therapy--the professional self description form.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73247
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M T Gullberg
H M Olsson
G. Alenfelt
A B Ivarsson
M. Nilsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Empathy
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Problem Solving
Professional Competence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Abstract
The majority of occupational therapists in Sweden previously worked on large occupational therapy wards. Health care policy has changed over the years and the system has been reorganized accordingly. The employment situation for occupational therapists has also changed. This paper focuses on the perception of professional self among occupational therapists. The objective was to explore the professional self and to suggest components important to the occupational therapist profession. The Professional Self Description Form (PSDF) was used for the exploration of self. The 19 items in the PSDF cover areas relevant to professional functioning and activity. Sixty-eight employed occupational therapists participated. The results of the PSDF were subjected to factor analysis and five factors were obtained; Ability to solve problems, Professionalism, Management, Empathy, and Working capacity. We believe that these five factors can function as improving domains of the role of the professional occupational therapist in Sweden.
PubMed ID
7724926 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health and family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31534
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Apr;48:680-1; author reply 681-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Jane McGillivray
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Apr;48:680-1; author reply 681-2
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Welfare
Empathy
Family Practice - standards
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Inuits
Newfoundland
Physician-Patient Relations
Notes
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Dec;47:2444-6, 2452-511785273
PubMed ID
12046355 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal women caregivers of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160837
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kay E Crosato
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Beverly Leipert
Author Affiliation
The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Kay.Crosato@halton.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural - methods
Caregivers
Community-Institutional Relations
Culture
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Social Values
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop a comprehensive understanding of Aboriginal women's experiences and perceptions of providing care to the elderly in geographically isolated communities (GIC). Research with Aboriginal women caregivers is essential as the population of Aboriginal elders is increasing, and Aboriginal women represent the majority of caregivers in their communities.
This study was guided by focused ethnography, which seeks an understanding of a sub-group within a cultural group by uncovering the less obvious expressions and behaviours of the sub-group members. Using one-on-one open-ended interviews and participant observation, 13 women from a number of Aboriginal communities in northern and southern Ontario participated in this study. Data analysis was conducted by reviewing transcripts of interviews to identify codes and themes.
Study findings revealed that four concentric circles represent the caring experiences of the Aboriginal women participants: the healers, the family, the Aboriginal community, and the non-Aboriginal community. Cultural values greatly informed participants' perceptions about caring for elderly persons in GIC. These values are represented in five themes: passing on traditions, being chosen to care, supporting the circle of healers, (re)establishing the circles of care, and accepting/refusing external resources.
The findings from this study have significant implications for healthcare practice and future research.
PubMed ID
17935459 View in PubMed
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Addressing spouses' unique needs after cardiac surgery when recovery is complicated by heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149887
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susanna Agren
Gunilla Hollman Frisman
Sören Berg
Rolf Svedjeholm
Anna Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping S-58185, Sweden. susanna.agren@liu.se
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Jul-Aug;38(4):284-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Empathy
Female
Heart Failure - etiology - nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Professional-Family Relations
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Cardiac surgery places extensive stress on spouses who often are more worried than the patients themselves. Spouses can experience difficult and demanding situations when the partner becomes critically ill.
To identify, describe, and conceptualize the individual needs of spouses of patients with complications of heart failure after cardiac surgery.
Grounded theory using a mix of systematic coding, data analysis, and theoretical sampling was performed. Spouses, 10 women and 3 men between 39 and 85 years, were interviewed.
During analysis, the core category of confirmation was identified as describing the individual needs of the spouses. The core category theoretically binds together three underlying subcategories: security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength. Confirmation facilitated acceptance and improvement of mental and physical health among spouses.
By identifying spouses' needs for security, rest for mind and body, and inner strength, health care professionals can confirm these needs throughout the caring process, from the critical care period and throughout rehabilitation at home. Interventions to confirm spouses' needs are important because they are vital to the patients' recovery.
PubMed ID
19577699 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' own suggestions for bullying interventions at age 13 and 16.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98941
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2010 Apr 1;51(2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2010
Author
Ann Frisén
Kristina Holmqvist
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2010 Apr 1;51(2):123-31
Date
Apr-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Age Factors
Attitude
Empathy
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Problem Solving
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Control, Informal
Social Environment
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
In this study we examined adolescents' perspectives on what interventions they consider to be effective in order to stop the bullying of a student. The adolescents' suggestions were reviewed at two time points, age 13 and 16. Participants were 474 girls and 403 boys at the first point of examination, and 429 girls and 332 boys at the second point of examination. The participants' suggestions were divided into categories based on some of the anti-bullying strategies commonly presented by researchers. Results showed that some anti-bullying strategies were more salient than others in the adolescents' suggestions, and that their suggestions differed as a function of age, sex and to some extent, current experience of victimization. Having serious talks with the students involved was among the most common suggestions at both ages. However, girls were more likely than boys, and non-victims were more likely than victims, to suggest this particular strategy.
PubMed ID
19674402 View in PubMed
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[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
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Against dichotomies: On mature care and self-sacrifice in care ethics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286954
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 Sep;24(6):694-703
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Inge van Nistelrooij
Carlo Leget
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 Sep;24(6):694-703
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Empathy - ethics
Ethical Theory
Ethics, Nursing
Humans
Moral Development
Norway
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Abstract
In previous issues of this journal, Carol Gilligan's original concept of mature care has been conceptualized by several (especially Norwegian) contributors. This has resulted in a dichotomous view of self and other, and of self-care and altruism, in which any form of self-sacrifice is rejected. Although this interpretation of Gilligan seems to be quite persistent in care-ethical theory, it does not seem to do justice to either Gilligan's original work or the tensions experienced in contemporary nursing practice.
A close reading of Gilligan's concept of mature care leads to a view that differs radically from any dichotomy of self-care and altruism. Instead of a dichotomous view, a dialectical view on self and other is proposed that builds upon connectedness and might support a care-ethical view of nursing that is more consistent with Gilligan's own critical insights such as relationality and a practice-based ethics. A concrete case taken from nursing practice shows the interconnectedness of professional and personal responsibility. This underpins a multilayered, complex view of self-realization that encompasses sacrifices as well.
When mature care is characterized as a practice of a multilayered connectedness, caregivers can be acknowledged for their relational identity and nursing practices can be recognized as multilayered and interconnected. This view is better able to capture the tensions that are related to today's nursing as a practice, which inevitably includes sacrifices of self. In conclusion, a further discussion on normative conceptualizations of care is proposed that starts with a non-normative scrutiny of caring practices.
PubMed ID
26811398 View in PubMed
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541 records – page 1 of 55.