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2006 behavioral health prevalence estimates in Alaska: Serious behavioral health disorders by household

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101177
Source
State of Alaska. Department of Health and Social Services.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Jan-15-2008
Author
WICHE Mental Health Program
Source
State of Alaska. Department of Health and Social Services.
Date
Jan-15-2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Age group
Alaska household demographics
Co-occurring disorders
Indicators
Populations
Prevalence estimates
Serious emotional disturbance (SED)
Serious mental illness (SMI)
Substance Use Disorders (SUD)
Abstract
This report is the first phase of a larger project to generate indicators of disparities in care and unmet need in Alaska. It provides prevalence estimates of serious behavioral health disorders. Prevalence estimates provide a standardized basis for defining the need for services in a population. The second phase of this larger project assesses the number of individuals who actually receive services. The third phase combines the information to generate indicators of unmet need and disparities in care. The project is an initiative of the Division of Behavioral Health (the Division) of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. The Division contracted with the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mental Health Program to facilitate the project. Phase I prevalence estimates were generated by an epidemiologist who has developed a technology specifically for this purpose. The synthetic estimation technology has been used for mental disorders by ten western states; Alaska is the first to use the substance use estimates.
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Abused women and child custody: the ongoing exposure to abusive ex-partners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202476
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Feb;29(2):416-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
C. Shalansky
J. Ericksen
A. Henderson
Author Affiliation
Burnaby Hospital, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Feb;29(2):416-26
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Battered Women - psychology
British Columbia
Child
Child Custody - legislation & jurisprudence
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Safety
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Abuse of women in domestic relationships has become an epidemic. Research studies have documented that abuse does not end when a woman with children leaves the abuser but, in fact, the danger increases. A father's legal right to custody of and access to his children and the children's bond with their father prevent a woman from truly breaking free of her abuser. Theoretical literature has addressed how custody and access can serve as a means for an abuser to continue his abuse and expose his children to ongoing abuse and discord. Research on how custody and access issues are affecting abused women is limited. Key details about this phenomenon are not known. Hence, a research study using the qualitative methodology of phenomenology was conducted on abused women's experiences with custody and access and the ongoing exposure to abusive ex-partners. Six single mothers who had left abusive relationships and were at the time sharing custody of and/or access to their children with their abusive ex-partners participated in the study. Unstructured, non-directive interviews were conducted. Direction for analysis was taken from the specific steps outlined by Giorgi. Data analysis revealed that all of the women were living in great fear for their safety and that of their children. The ongoing danger and stress of living with the restrictions of the law took its toll on the women and ultimately affected their physical health and psychological well-being. The women described their experiences as having four components: (1) safety--living with ongoing danger; (2) stress--living with the restrictions of the law and the legal system; (3) coping--social support systems; and (4) to heal and move forward in life.
PubMed ID
10197942 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of an emotional and behavioural screening tool for children in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in urban NSW.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140192
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Anna Williamson
Sally Redman
Mark Dadds
John Daniels
Catherine D'Este
Beverley Raphael
Sandra Eades
Tracey Skinner
Author Affiliation
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. anna.williamson@saxinstitute.org.au
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010 Oct;44(10):894-900
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child Welfare
Community Health Services
Emotions
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental health
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Psychological Tests
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and face validity of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in Aboriginal community controlled health services (ACCHOs) located in the greater Sydney region.
A qualitative study was conducted in three ACCHOs located within the greater Sydney region in 2008-2009. A semi-structured approach was used in focus groups and small group interviews (n = 47) to elicit participants' views on the appropriateness of the SDQ and any additional issues of importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health.
The SDQ was found to cover many important aspects of Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health, however, the wording of some questions was considered ambiguous and some critical issues are not explored. The peer relationships subscale did not appear to fit well with Aboriginal concepts of the relative importance of different interpersonal relationships.
Overall the SDQ was acceptable in ACCHOs in Sydney; however, changes to the wording of some questions and the response scale may be indicated to improve cultural appropriateness and clarity. A further set of issues which are not covered by any commonly used screening tools but are of critical importance to Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health should also be considered by clinicians.
PubMed ID
20932203 View in PubMed
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Activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems and baseline arterial blood pressure in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91971
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Aftanas L I
Sidorova P V
Pavlov S V
Makhnev V P
Korenek V V
Reva N V
Amstislavskaya T G
Author Affiliation
Psychophysiology Laboratory, State Research Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 4 Timakov Street, 630117, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Electromyography
Emotions - physiology
Galvanic Skin Response - physiology
Heart Rate - physiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Male
Motivation
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Oculomotor Muscles - physiology
Photic Stimulation
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Smoking - physiopathology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present work was to identify possible associations between individual balances in the activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems using a method based on emotional modulation of the startle reaction (EMSR) by motivationally significant emotionally positive and negative contextual visual stimuli and measures of cardiovascular system activity. Studies were performed using healthy males (mean age 30.29 +/- 9.8 years) with normal and first-episode excessive increases in arterial blood pressure (systolic blood pressure to greater than 140 mmHg, diastolic to greater than 90 mmHg). Cluster analysis of EMSR data identified groups of individuals with different activity profiles for the positive and negative reinforcement systems. Groups of subjects with changes in the balance of activity towards a lower level of positive reinforcement system activity (smaller startle reflexes to positive contextual stimuli) or a higher level of negative reinforcement system activity (larger startle reactions to threatening contextual stimuli) showed significantly greater baseline SBP and DBP. The possible mechanisms of the modulatory influences of the balance of system activities on autonomic vascular regulatory processes are discussed.
PubMed ID
18802770 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture with manual and low frequency electrical stimulation as experienced by women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125543
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Annika Billhult
Elisabet Stener-Victorin
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit of the County Södra Älvsborg, Sven Eriksonsplatsen 4, 503 38 Borås, Sweden. annika.billhult@vgregion.se
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:32
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods - psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Electric Stimulation - methods
Electroacupuncture - methods - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Hyperandrogenism - therapy
Interviews as Topic
Menstruation
Ovulation
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - psychology - therapy
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10 percent of all fertile women and is associated with anovulation/oligoovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Pharmacological treatment is often effective but associated with unwanted side effects. Acupuncture treatments have been shown to improve menstrual bleeding patterns and ovulation as well as hyperandrogenism, without side effects. The purpose of the present study was to describe the experience of acupuncture for women diagnosed with PCOS.
Eight women with PCOS living in western Sweden, were interviewed following repeated acupuncture treatments. Data was analyzed using systematic text condensation as described by Malterud.
The experience of acupuncture for women diagnosed with PCOS can be described in five categories; the experience of hope, getting results, feelings of responsibility, skepticism and proof of effect, and feeling normal.
Since acupuncture is a promising treatment for the symptoms of the common syndrome PCOS, the present study adds to the knowledge base by providing the important experiences of patients receiving the treatment. Acupuncture provides a possibility for patients to gain hope as the treatment shows results. The results show that acupuncture empowers the patients to take responsibility for their future well-being, although they may have been initially skeptical to the treatment. Because the syndrome had affected them for some time, even small changes offered a chance for them to feel that their bodies were capable of normal function.
Notes
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Oct;114(4):936-4919888063
Cites: Complement Ther Med. 2009 Oct-Dec;17(5-6):269-7319942106
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2009 Aug;297(2):R387-9519494176
Cites: Acupunct Electrother Res. 1991;16(1-2):1-51674830
Cites: Fam Pract. 1993 Jun;10(2):201-68359612
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 2006 Jul;101(1):84-9116514000
Cites: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2007 Apr;47(2):145-917355306
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Aug 25;370(9588):685-9717720020
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Mar;79(3):180-810716298
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2004 Jan;19(1):41-714688154
Cites: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2011 Nov-Dec;40(6):709-1822092488
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2012 Jan;97(1):28-38.e2522153789
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Oct;96(10):3143-5021816787
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Jun;61(587):e306-1521801509
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2011 Aug;96(2):452-821703610
Cites: J Altern Complement Med. 2011 Jun;17(6):519-2921649518
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Jan;300(1):E37-4520943753
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 May;32(5):453-920500954
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2010 May 1;93(7):2169-7420338559
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2010 Feb;25(2):450-619933236
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;33(3):382-41119597976
PubMed ID
22471422 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in middle-aged women: narrations from the patients and their partners during rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54063
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2000 Aug;16(4):256-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M. Svedlund
I. Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund. Marianne.Svedlund@hvs.mh.se
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2000 Aug;16(4):256-65
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Attitude to Health
Denial (Psychology)
Emotions
Fear
Female
Freedom
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shame
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning of lived experiences after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and being a partner to an afflicted woman, as it is narrated during rehabilitation. Nine women and their partners narrated their experiences three and twelve months after AMI. The interview texts were transcribed and then interpreted, using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The result showed that their experiences of the illness contained two themes: 'rehabilitation needed' and 'loss of freedom' which contains eight sub-themes; 'adapting to it', 'struggling against it', 'living as normally as possible', 'having insight into how it can be', 'feeling guilty and ashamed about being weak', 'withholding feelings', 'feeling useless', and 'feeling fatigued and losing strength'. After further interpretation, the themes gave a deeper meaning of living with AMI and how it affects women and their partners. The women conceded that they felt distressed and vulnerable but struggled against the fear the illness means. The partner's role appears to be one of trying to adapt to the women's experiences of the illness. That the women withheld their feelings and did not talk about them indicates a lack of communication between the couples. As coronary care nurses often come very close both to the afflicted persons and the relatives they fill an important function in each patient's recovery. The nurses could help and prepare the patients and their relatives to understand better such feelings and reactions as could appear after discharge from hospital.
PubMed ID
10922190 View in PubMed
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Adding "Circle of Security - Parenting" to treatment as usual in three Swedish infant mental health clinics. Effects on parents' internal representations and quality of parent-infant interaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295022
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2018 Jun; 59(3):262-272
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Pia Risholm Mothander
Catarina Furmark
Kerstin Neander
Author Affiliation
Department of psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2018 Jun; 59(3):262-272
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mental health
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents - psychology
Psychology, Child
Sweden
Abstract
This study presents effects of adding Circle of Security-Parenting (COS-P) to an already established comprehensive therapeutic model for early parent-child intervention in three Swedish infant mental health (IMH) clinics. Parents' internal representations and quality of parent-infant interaction were studied in a clinical sample comprised of 52 parent-infant dyads randomly allocated to two comparable groups. One group consisted of 28 dyads receiving treatment as usual (TAU) supplemented with COS-P in a small group format, and another group of 24 dyads receiving TAU only. Assessments were made at baseline (T1), 6 months after inclusion (T2) and 12 months after inclusion (T3). Changes over time were explored in 42 dyads. In the COS-P group, the proportion of balanced representations, as assessed with Working Model of the Child Interview (WMCI), significantly increased between T1 and T3. Further, the proportion of emotionally available interactions, as assessed with Emotional Availability scales (EA), significantly increased over time in the COS-P group. Improvements in the TAU-group were close to significant. Limitations of the study are mainly related to the small sample size. Strength is the real world character of the study, where COS-P was implemented in a clinical context not otherwise adapted to research. We conclude by discussing the value of supplementing TAU with COS-P in IMH treatment.
PubMed ID
29244205 View in PubMed
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"A disease of frozen feelings": ethically working on emotional worlds in a Russian Orthodox Church drug rehabilitation program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140042
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2010 Sep;24(3):326-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Jarrett Zigon
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Amsterdam, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology.
Source
Med Anthropol Q. 2010 Sep;24(3):326-43
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Eastern Orthodoxy - psychology
Emotions
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Social Adjustment
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - ethics - methods - organization & administration
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
In a Russian Orthodox Church drug rehabilitation program in St. Petersburg, drug addiction was often described as a disease of frozen feelings. This image suggests that rehabilitation is a process of thawing emotional worlds and, thus, allows the emotions to flow once again. In this article I argue that "frozen feelings" is better understood as the unsocial emotional worlds many drug users experience, and that rehabilitation in this church-run program particularly focuses on the cultivation of an emotional world that supports sociality. This is done, I argue, by means of ethically training rehabilitants to learn how to control and manage their emotional worlds, and in so doing, rehabilitants become new moral persons better able to live in the social world.
PubMed ID
20949839 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with and without a facial difference: The role of friendships and social acceptance in perceptions of appearance and emotional resilience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142923
Source
Body Image. 2010 Sep;7(4):271-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Kristin Billaud Feragen
Ingela L Kvalem
Nichola Rumsey
Anne I H Borge
Author Affiliation
Bredtvet Resource Center, Oslo, Norway. kristin.feragen@statped.no
Source
Body Image. 2010 Sep;7(4):271-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Image
Cleft Lip - psychology
Cleft Palate - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Emotions
Female
Friends - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This study investigated the role of friendships and social acceptance in self-perceptions of appearance and depressive symptoms, comparing adolescents with and without a facial difference. Adolescents with a visible cleft (n=196) were compared with adolescents with a non-visible cleft (n=93), and with a comparison group (n=1832). Boys with a visible difference reported significantly more positive perceptions of friendships and less depressive symptoms than the comparison group. These results were interpreted in the context of indicators of emotional resilience. The objective measure of facial difference did not explain levels of depressive symptoms, while subjective measures did. Subjective ratings of appearance mediated the association between social acceptance and depressive symptoms in all samples. Gender did not contribute in explaining the paths between friendships, appearance, and depressive symptoms. The associations between perceptions of social acceptance, appearance, and emotional distress, support the possible utility of strengthening social experiences in preventing and treating appearance-concerns.
PubMed ID
20541483 View in PubMed
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969 records – page 1 of 97.