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3094 records – page 1 of 310.

The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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[4. Analysis of opisthorchiasis infestation among new arrivals in 1 of the endemic foci of the central Ob region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235224
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1987 May-Jun;(3):52-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bronshtein
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1987 May-Jun;(3):52-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Opisthorchiasis - epidemiology
Siberia
PubMed ID
3626983 View in PubMed
Less detail

12th International Congress of Human Genetics. Life on the fertile frontier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129901
Source
Science. 2011 Nov 4;334(6056):582
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-4-2011

Abetting emigration of Canada's nurses and doctors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173514
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Mark Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto Division of Neurosurgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):8-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
North Carolina
Nursing Staff - supply & distribution
Physicians - supply & distribution
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Q. 2004;7(3):suppl 2-1115230179
PubMed ID
16078391 View in PubMed
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[Abnormalities among children born to immigrants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38141
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 May 1;151(18):1097
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1989
Author
S. Klebak
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 May 1;151(18):1097
Date
May-1-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology - genetics
Consanguinity
Denmark
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
PubMed ID
2734871 View in PubMed
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[Abnormalities among newborn children born to immigrants in Denmark in the period 1983-1987]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38140
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 May 1;151(18):1101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1989
Author
F. Mac
L B Knudsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 May 1;151(18):1101-6
Date
May-1-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Denmark
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
It has recently been discussed whether there was a higher incidence of congenital malformations among newborns of immigrant mothers than among Danish infants. The study is based on information retrieved from two registries in the Danish National Board of Health, both with national coverage: The Medical Birth Register and the Register of Congenital Malformations. All livebirths in Denmark, born to women from Denmark, Scandinavia, Yugoslavia, Turkey, Pakistan, Morocco, Iran and Vietnam in the years 1983-1987, more than 240,000 infants, were included. When comparing the birth prevalence of congenital malformations in the various groups, the observed rate is corrected for maternal age and parity distribution, fathers' occupation (indicating the social position) and county of delivery, as ascertainment varies between hospitals. This part of the analysis did not support the observation of an increased incidence among offspring of immigrant women. A more detailed analysis, based on a multiplicative Poisson-model, compares the three largest groups: Danish, Turkish and Pakistani mothers. Evaluating the influence of maternal age, father's occupation and county of delivery, the result is that the differences observed can, to a large degree, be explained by these three factors, especially the county of delivery. The remaining differences are no larger than can be explained as random. We were thus unable to support the debated observation on a higher incidence of congenital malformations among infants born to immigrant mothers.
PubMed ID
2734873 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal youth in Canada: a profile based upon 1981 census data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39493
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985
Author
G E Priest
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Canada
Censuses
Comparative Study
Culture
Demography
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Income
Indians, North American
Industry
North America
Occupations
Population
Population Characteristics
Research
Unemployment
Abstract
An analysis of the data from the 1981 census of Canada is presented concerning the aboriginal population aged 15 to 24, defined as including the Inuit, status Indian, non-status Indian, and Metis populations. Comparisons are made with the non-aboriginal population. Factors considered include geographic location, migration, family status, dependent children, educational status, labor force participation, unemployment, income, and industry.
PubMed ID
12340640 View in PubMed
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Abortion rate and contraceptive practices in immigrant and native women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71181
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(6):405-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Lotti Helström
Viveca Odlind
Catharina Zätterström
Monica Johansson
Fredrik Granath
Nestor Correia
Anders Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Women and Child Health, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Lotti.helström@ks.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(6):405-10
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Contraception Behavior
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to analyse whether immigrant women request induced abortion more frequently than Swedish-born women and, if so, to study possible explanations, including contraceptive practices and attitudes. METHODS: All women who requested induced abortion during a period of one year were included in the study. The 1289 women, of whom 36% were born outside Sweden, were interviewed by a nurse-midwife who, using a structured protocol, gathered information on socioeconomic factors, reasons for abortion, experience of contraceptive methods, and family planning counselling. The proportion of women with non-Swedish origin in the study population was compared with the official demographic statistics of the corresponding area. RESULTS: The number of women born outside Sweden who requested induced abortion was larger than expected from their proportion in the population. The immigrant women originated from 77 countries and four continents, the largest subgroup, 11%, coming from Iran. Immigrant women had less experience of contraceptive use, more previous pregnancies and more induced abortions than women born in Sweden. In a multivariate analysis, immigrant status and educational level were found to be independent risk factors for repeat abortion. CONCLUSION: Immigrant status seems to be an independent risk factor for induced abortion. The immigrant women originated from a wide range of cultures. There is no reason to believe that the women in this heterogeneous group should have any cultural factor in common that could explain their higher proneness to seek induced abortion. The most probable cause is that immigrant status is associated more often with low education, weak social network, poverty, unemployment, and being outside common pathways to healthcare.
PubMed ID
14675931 View in PubMed
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Abortion rate and contraceptive practices in immigrant and Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82093
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2006 Jun;19(3):209-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Helström Lotti
Zätterström Catharina
Odlind Viveca
Author Affiliation
Department of Women and Child Health, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Lotti.helstrom@sodersjukhuset.se
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2006 Jun;19(3):209-13
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Contraception Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Contraceptive Agents - therapeutic use
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Interviews
Pregnancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To analyze if immigrant girls request early pregnancy termination more frequently than ethnic Swedish girls and, if so, study possible explanations, including contraceptive practices and attitudes. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: All women under 19 years of age who attended a large abortion clinic during one year were interviewed. Out of 126 adolescents, 36% were born outside Sweden. The immigrant girls (37 born abroad and 23 with at least one parent born abroad) were compared to 66 ethnic Swedish girls regarding contraceptive habits, reasons for abortion and social factors. RESULTS: The proportion of adolescents born abroad was larger than expected: 38 (29%) were born outside Sweden, compared to 18% in corresponding areas of Stockholm. The ethnic Swedish girls had fewer previous pregnancies than first and second generation immigrants and had more experience of contraceptive counselling. The most common reason for abortion in both groups was the wish to finish education. Ethnical Swedish girls claimed young age as reason for abortion more often than immigrants; economic reasons and reasons related to partner relationship were also common. CONCLUSION: First generation immigrant girls are over-represented among adolescents who seek termination of pregnancy. This can be explained by the fact that the immigrant girls had less experience of contraceptive use and contraceptive counselling than ethnical Swedish girls.
PubMed ID
16731415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion referral and MD emigration: areas of concern and study for CMA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248948
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Jan 21;118(2):175, 206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-21-1978

3094 records – page 1 of 310.