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3090 records – page 1 of 309.

Source
J Anal Psychol. 2013 Feb;58(1):34-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Elena Pourtova
Source
J Anal Psychol. 2013 Feb;58(1):34-51
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Memory
Russia
Social Identification
Abstract
Nostalgia for the Soviet Union is a major social phenomenon in Russia today due to the irrevocable losses of the recent past in which Soviet citizens involuntarily became immigrants in their own country. With reference to discussions of nostalgia in philosophical and psychoanalytic literature, I suggest that nostalgia may represent either a defensive regression to the past or a progressive striving for wholeness through re-connecting with what has been lost in the service of a greater integration. I compare this with the processes of adaptation seen in immigrants and provide a clinical illustration of a young man coming to terms with loss and change in the post-Soviet era. When nostalgia is recognized as a legitimate emotional experience it may facilitate mourning and enable the integration of the past with the present and the development of a new identity.
PubMed ID
23350997 View in PubMed
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Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 May 22-28;110(21):1046
Publication Type
Article
Author
Faraidoun Moradi
Author Affiliation
Enköpings Husläkarcentrum. moradi_fs@hotmail.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 May 22-28;110(21):1046
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Barriers
Emigrants and Immigrants
Emigration and Immigration
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Sweden - ethnology
PubMed ID
23805773 View in PubMed
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[The concentration of homocysteine in blood serum among indigene and outsider population of priamurye].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122824
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2012 Apr;(4):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
T I riabova
T V Popova
B Z Sirotin
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2012 Apr;(4):16-9
Date
Apr-2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emigrants and Immigrants
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
The study evaluated the concentration of homocysteine in the most numerous groups of indigene population of Priamurye (Even, Ultch, Nanai) as compared with adjacent to them outsider population. The technique of random sampling was applied to select 82 Even, 89 Ultch, 95 Nanai and for comparing the representatives of outsider male and female population in statistically comparable numbers. The concentration of homocysteine was determined with luminescence immunoassay using the analyzer immulite 1000 (Diagnostic Products Corporation, USA) and applying Siemens kits (USA). The mean population values of homocysteine were reliably lower among indigene males and females as compared with representatives of outsider population. The lowest values of homocysteine were established among Even males and females, dwelling on the shore of Sea of Okhotsk. Whereas no reliable differences in concentrations ofhomocysteine in blood serum were established among Ultch dwelling in downstream of Amur river and Nanai dwelling in middle course of Amur river 240 km from Khabarovsk.
PubMed ID
22768709 View in PubMed
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Acculturation in elite sport: a thematic analysis of immigrant athletes and coaches.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113774
Source
J Sports Sci. 2013;31(15):1676-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Robert Joel Schinke
Kerry R McGannon
Randy Cesar Battochio
Greg D Wells
Author Affiliation
a Laurentian University , School of Human Kinetics , B241 Ben Avery Building, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury , Ontario , P3E2C6 Canada.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2013;31(15):1676-86
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Athletes
Canada
Culture
Emigrants and Immigrants
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Residence Characteristics
Sports
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify key issues concerning the acculturation of immigrant athletes in sport psychology, a thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) was conducted on focus group interview data from immigrant elite athletes relocated to Canada (n = 13) and coaches working with such athletes (n = 10). Two central themes were identified: (a) navigating two world views which referred to acculturation as a fluid process where athletes navigated between cultural norms of the home community and the host community, and (b) acculturation loads, which referred to whether immigrants and those in the host country shared acculturation (i.e., acculturation as a two-way process) or managed the load with or without support from others (i.e., acculturation as one-directional). Each of these central themes comprised sub-themes, which provided further insight into the experiences of acculturation for immigrant elite athletes. From the project, the authors recommend further research utilising case studies to provide a holistic description of the acculturation process from the vantage of various people within the sport context.
PubMed ID
23688005 View in PubMed
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National identification and attitudes towards Russian immigrants in Finland: Investigating the role of perceived threats and gains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278553
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Dec;56(6):670-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Asteria Brylka
Tuuli Anna Mähönen
Inga Jasinskaja-Lahti
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Dec;56(6):670-7
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice
Russia
Social Identification
Abstract
In this cross-sectional study, we examined the relationship between national identification of majority Finns (nation-wide probability sample, N = 335) and their attitudes towards Russian immigrants living in Finland. As previous research indicates both possibilities, we tested whether this relationship was moderated or mediated by threats and gains perceived to result from immigration. The results supported the mediation hypothesis; those individuals who identified stronger with their national ingroup perceived more threats than gains related to increased immigration and these perceptions, in turn, were associated with more negative attitudes towards immigrants. The role of realistic as opposed to symbolic threats and gains was particularly pronounced. The implications of the results are discussed in terms of their theoretical relevance and practical means to improve intergroup relations, with a particular focus on the relations between Finns and Russian immigrants in Finland.
PubMed ID
26355394 View in PubMed
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12th International Congress of Human Genetics. Life on the fertile frontier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129901
Source
Science. 2011 Nov 4;334(6056):582
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Nov-4-2011
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:514-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Finn Lynge
Author Affiliation
oldlyn@greennet.gl
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:514-6
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emigration and Immigration
Greenland
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
Greenland, and more specifically the present-day south west coastal district, is that exact spot on the world map where humankind completed its conquest of the Earth. As Norsemen coming over the Atlantic from Iceland and Norway encountered first North-American natives in present-day Labrador around year 1000, and about 150 years later the Inuit coming in from Baffin, slowly occupying the Greenland west coast, humankind had finally encircled the globe, unaware of the extraordinary aspect of the situation. The first few encounters in Labrador were violent, but later, cohabitation in South West Greenland had a mainly peaceful character. Present-day Narsaq district is the precise area where archeology gives witness to peaceful cohabitation between Inuit and Norsemen in the first half of the 15th century.
PubMed ID
19205129 View in PubMed
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Ethnic differences in the incidence of cancer in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282443
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Apr 15;140(8):1770-1780
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2017
Author
Kirsti V Hjerkind
Samera A Qureshi
Bjørn Møller
Elisabete Weiderpass
Dennis Deapen
Bernadette Kumar
Giske Ursin
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Apr 15;140(8):1770-1780
Date
Apr-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Emigrants and Immigrants
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Groups
Abstract
Traditionally there have been differences in cancer incidence across geographic regions. When immigrants have moved from low-income to high-income countries, their incidence have changed as they have adapted to the lifestyle in the new host country. Given worldwide changes in lifestyle factors over time, we decided to examine cancer incidence in immigrant groups in Norway, a country with a recent immigration history, complete cancer registration and universal public health care. We linked immigration history for the complete population to information on cancer diagnosis from the Cancer Registry of Norway for the period 1990-2012. Age-standardized (world) overall and site-specific cancer incidence were estimated for different immigrant groups and compared to incidence among individuals born in Norway. Among 850,008 immigrants, 9,158 men and 10,334 women developed cancer, and among 5,508,429 Norwegian-born, 263,316 men and 235,020 women developed cancer. While incidence of breast and colorectal cancer were highest among individuals born in Norway and other high-income countries, other cancer types were higher in immigrants from low-income countries. Lung cancer incidence was highest in Eastern European men, and men and women from Eastern Europe had high incidence of stomach cancer. Incidence of liver cancer was substantially higher in immigrants from low-income countries than in individuals born in Norway and other high-income countries. Our results mirror known cancer challenges across the world. Although cancer incidence overall is lower in immigrants from low-income countries, certain cancers, such as lung, liver and stomach cancer, represent major challenges in specific immigrant groups.
PubMed ID
28063159 View in PubMed
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[4. Analysis of opisthorchiasis infestation among new arrivals in 1 of the endemic foci of the central Ob region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235224
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1987 May-Jun;(3):52-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bronshtein
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1987 May-Jun;(3):52-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Opisthorchiasis - epidemiology
Siberia
PubMed ID
3626983 View in PubMed
Less detail

Letter: Epidemiology of tuberculosis in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251821
Source
N Engl J Med. 1975 Oct 23;293(17):880
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-1975
Author
M J Ashley
Source
N Engl J Med. 1975 Oct 23;293(17):880
Date
Oct-23-1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
PubMed ID
1177984 View in PubMed
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3090 records – page 1 of 309.