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Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158048
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Yasmin Asvat
Vanessa L Malcarne
Author Affiliation
San Diego State University, CA 92120-4913, USA.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Mass Screening
Parenting
Religion and Psychology
Social Identification
Social Values
Students - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime).
PubMed ID
22023606 View in PubMed
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Clear conscience grounded in relations: Expressions of Persian-speaking nurses in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284057
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 May;24(3):349-361
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Monir Mazaheri
Eva Ericson-Lidman
Ali Zargham-Boroujeni
Joakim Öhlén
Astrid Norberg
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2017 May;24(3):349-361
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Conscience
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Nurses, International - psychology
Perception
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Conscience is an important concept in ethics, having various meanings in different cultures. Because a growing number of healthcare professionals are of immigrant background, particularly within the care of older people, demanding multiple ethical positions, it is important to explore the meaning of conscience among care providers within different cultural contexts.
The study aimed to illuminate the meaning of conscience by enrolled nurses with an Iranian background working in residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia.
A phenomenological hermeneutical method guided the study. Participants and research context: A total of 10 enrolled nurses with Iranian background, aged 33-46 years, participated in the study. All worked full time in residential care settings for Persian-speaking people with dementia in a large city, in Sweden. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board for ethical vetting of research involving humans. Participants were given verbal and written study information and assured that their participation was voluntary and confidential.
Three themes were constructed including perception of conscience, clear conscience grounded in relations and striving to keep a clear conscience. The conscience was perceived as an inner guide grounded in feelings, which is dynamic and subject to changes throughout life. Having a clear conscience meant being able to form a bond with others, to respect them and to get their confirmation that one does well. To have a clear conscience demanded listening to the voice of the conscience. The enrolled nurses strived to keep their conscience clear by being generous in helping others, accomplishing daily tasks well and behaving nicely in the hope of being treated the same way one day.
Cultural frameworks and the context of practice needed to be considered in interpreting the meaning of conscience and clear conscience.
PubMed ID
26385903 View in PubMed
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Counseling Immigrant Parents about Food and Feeding Practices: Public Health Nurses' Experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281404
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2016 07;33(4):343-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
07-2016
Author
Bettina Holmberg Fagerlund
Kjell Sverre Pettersen
Laura Terragni
Kari Glavin
Source
Public Health Nurs. 2016 07;33(4):343-50
Date
07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Health Services
Communication Barriers
Counseling
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Infant
Language
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses, Public Health - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parents - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To describe the experiences of public health nurses (PHNs) in counseling immigrant parents on food and feeding practices at child health centers (CHCs).
In this study employing a qualitative description (QD) approach, the participants (n = 26) were PHNs from five CHCs in the greater Oslo region of Norway.
Data were collected through five focus group interviews and examined using qualitative content analysis.
Counseling on food and feeding practices was an important topic in most consultations with immigrant parents. The PHNs were concerned that the child should eat ordinary, healthy food regularly. Immigrant families were often experienced as a "generic group" and the PHNs disclosed that they rarely adjusted their counseling strategy based on enquiries about families' food culture or parents' level of education or knowledge. Time constraints and language and cultural barriers were common challenges. The PHNs suggested that culturally adapted information materials and visual aids from health authorities could improve communication.
Counseling immigrant parents on food and feeding at CHCs is often challenging for PHNs. The study findings could be used in the development of guidelines to assist PHNs in delivering culturally competent counseling about food and feeding practices.
PubMed ID
26813084 View in PubMed
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Cultural beliefs and coping strategies related to childhood cancer: the perceptions of South Asian immigrant parents in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133918
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2011 May-Jun;28(3):169-78
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ananya Tina Banerjee
Lisa Watt
Sonia Gulati
Lillian Sung
David Dix
Robert Klassen
Anne F Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2011 May-Jun;28(3):169-78
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Qualitative Research
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to describe cultural beliefs and coping strategies related to dealing with childhood cancer identified through a qualitative study of the caregiving experiences of first-generation South Asian immigrant parents of children with cancer. A constructivist grounded theory approach was employed. Families with a child at least 6 months postdiagnosis were recruited from 5 Canadian pediatric oncology centers. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted in English, Hindi, Punjabi, or Urdu with a sample of 25 South Asian parents. Analysis of interviews involved line-by-line coding and using the constant comparison method. The following 2 central themes related to culture and coping emerged: (a) cultural beliefs about childhood cancer being incurable, rare, unspeakable, and understood through religion and (b) parental coping strategies included gaining information about the child's cancer, practicing religious rituals and prayers, trusting the health care professionals, and obtaining mutual support from other South Asian parents. These cultural beliefs and coping strategies have important implications for health care providers to understand the variations in the perceptions of childhood cancer and coping in order to implement culturally sensitive health care services.
PubMed ID
21646638 View in PubMed
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Cultural framework, anger expression, and health status in Russian immigrant women in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117309
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2013;34(2):169-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Zhanna Bagdasarov
Christine B Edmondson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA. zhannab@ou.edu
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2013;34(2):169-89
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Anger
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Questionnaires
Russia
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
We investigated the role of anger expression and cultural framework in predicting Russian immigrant women's physical and psychological health status. One hundred Russian immigrant women between the ages of 30 and 65 completed questionnaires assessing anger expression, cultural framework, and health status. All research questions were addressed using hierarchical regression procedures. The results are discussed in terms of implications for understanding immigration experiences of Russian women who migrate from countries that are more collectivistic and less individualistic than the United States.
PubMed ID
23311909 View in PubMed
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A culturally adapted lifestyle intervention addressing a Middle Eastern immigrant population at risk of diabetes, the MEDIM (impact of Migration and Ethnicity on Diabetes In Malmö): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258037
Source
Trials. 2013;14:279
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sanjib Saha
Matti Leijon
Ulf Gerdtham
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Daniel Arvidsson
Louise Bennet
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University/Region Skåne, Skåne University Hospital, Building 60, floor 12 Jan Waldenströms gata 37, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Louise.Bennet@med.lu.se.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:279
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Arabs - psychology
Biological Markers - metabolism
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Clinical Protocols
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - economics - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Diet - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Emigration and Immigration
Exercise
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Care Costs
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Iraq - ethnology
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Research Design
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Studies have shown that lifestyle interventions are effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk patients. However, research on the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions in high-risk immigrant populations with different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds is scarce. The aim was to design a culturally adapted lifestyle intervention for an immigrant population and to evaluate its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.
In this randomized controlled trial, 308 participants (born in Iraq, living in Malmö, Sweden and at high risk of type 2 diabetes) will be allocated to either a culturally adapted intervention or a control group. The intervention will consist of 10 group counseling sessions focusing on diet, physical activity and behavioral change over 6 months, and the offer of exercise sessions. Cultural adaptation includes gender-specific exercise sessions, and counseling by a health coach community member. The control group will receive the information about healthy lifestyle habits provided by the primary health care center. The primary outcome is change in fasting glucose level. Secondary outcomes are changes in body mass index, insulin sensitivity, physical activity, food habits and health-related quality of life. Measurements will be taken at baseline, after 3 and 6 months. Data will be analyzed by the intention-to-treat approach. The cost-effectiveness during the trial period and over the longer term will be assessed by simulation modeling from patient, health care and societal perspectives.
This study will provide a basis to measure the effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention designed for immigrants from the Middle East in terms of improvement in glucose metabolism, and will also assess its cost-effectiveness. Results from this trial may help health care providers and policy makers to adapt and implement lifestyle interventions suitable for this population group that can be conducted in the community.
ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01420198.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24006857 View in PubMed
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Exclusion of older immigrants from the former Soviet Union to Finland: the meaning of intergenerational relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130706
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Dec;26(4):379-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Sari J Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere 33014, Finland. sari.johanna.heikkinen@uta.fi
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Dec;26(4):379-95
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Intergenerational Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Nuclear Family
Social Isolation
Stereotyping
USSR - ethnology
Abstract
This article discusses factors that affect the exclusion of older immigrants in Finland. The meaning of intergenerational relationships to older immigrants in an everyday life context is versatile and comprises support, commitment and expectations between generations. The second and third generations are doing their best to cope with their own everyday life and integration process while being under the pressure to meet the varied expectations of the first generation. The topic is explored using qualitative data drawn from interviews with three-generation families from the former Soviet Union. The study found that satisfying factors of everyday life, such as housing or activities offered by society and the possibility to live close to the children and grandchildren reflect the feeling of inclusion to the host society. Dissatisfying feelings such as hostile attitudes, deficient language acquisition and a longing for the former home country, people and places there, affect the feelings of social and emotional exclusion. The exclusion faced by older immigrants in the Finnish society seems to be more complicated and sensitive than is generally recognized; it is illustrated through the emotions of immigrant elders rather than through their active actions or participation.
PubMed ID
21976211 View in PubMed
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Health behaviour among non-Western immigrants with Danish citizenship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86333
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Mar;36(2):205-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Hansen Anne R
Ekholm Ola
Kjøller Mette
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. aha@niph.dh
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Mar;36(2):205-10
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology
Body mass index
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark - ethnology
Diet - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - ethnology
Vegetables
Abstract
AIMS: To compare belief in own effort to stay healthy, health behaviour and body mass index (BMI) among non-Western immigrants with Danish citizenship and citizens with Danish background. METHODS: Based on the National Health Interview Survey 2005, logistic regression analyses were used to examine differences in belief in own effort to stay healthy, in health behaviour and in BMI between 136 non-Western immigrants with Danish citizenship and 9,901 citizens with Danish background in the age group 25-64 years. RESULTS: Non-Western immigrants had lower odds for reporting that own effort is very important to maintain good health (odds ratio (OR) 0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32-0.62) and for reporting consuming more alcohol on a weekly basis than recommended by the Danish National Board of Health (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.09-0.51). The odds were higher for non-Western immigrants for than citizens with Danish background for reporting sedentary spare-time activities (OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.96-4.17), daily consumption of boiled vegetables (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.77-3.53), and daily consumption of salad/raw vegetables (OR 2.84, 95% CI 2.02-3.99). We found no differences in daily smoking, daily fruit consumption, BMI> or =25 or BMI> or =30. CONCLUSIONS: The non-Western immigrants are healthier in terms of alcohol and vegetable consumption and unhealthier with regard to leisure-time physical activity. The non-Western immigrants are less likely to report that their own effort is important in maintaining good health.
PubMed ID
18519286 View in PubMed
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Living with Diabetes: Personal Interviews with Pakistani Women in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299953
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2018 Aug; 20(4):848-853
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
Walaa Abuelmagd
Helle Håkonsen
Khadijah Qurrat-Ul-Ain Mahmood
Najmeh Taghizadeh
Else-Lydia Toverud
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Blindern, P.O. Box 1068, 0316, Oslo, Norway. walaa.abuelmagd@farmasi.uio.no.
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2018 Aug; 20(4):848-853
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Cultural Characteristics
Diabetes Complications - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - ethnology - therapy
Diet
Drug Therapy, Combination
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Exercise
Female
Health status
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Interviews as Topic
Life Style - ethnology
Literacy
Medication Adherence - ethnology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pakistan - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes (T2D) among Pakistani women in Norway is remarkably high. This study aims to assess how they live with the disease and their response to lifestyle and medical information. 120 Pakistani women living in Norway (mean age: 55.7 years) were personally interviewed about their T2D using a structured questionnaire (response rate: 95%). The participants were first-generation immigrants (mean residence time: 28.7 years) of whom 27% were illiterates. Poor health was reported by one-third, and 71% had developed macrovascular comorbidities. A majority reported physical inactivity and an unhealthy diet included religious fasting. One-third was not able to self-measure their blood glucose. There was a great variation in antidiabetic drug regimens and one-fourth had to use insulin in addition to tablets. Pakistani women in Norway showed suboptimal control of their T2D in terms of lifestyle habits, comorbidities and drug use. Low literacy and cultural factors seem to challenge adherence to lifestyle and medical information.
PubMed ID
28698971 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.