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The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism: a comparison across Asian Canadians and European Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123132
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Véronique Franche
Patrick Gaudreau
Dave Miranda
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Jacques Lussier, ON, Canada. vfran053@uottawa.ca
Source
J Couns Psychol. 2012 Oct;59(4):567-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personal Satisfaction
Personality
Students - psychology
Abstract
The 2 Ã? 2 model of perfectionism posits that the 4 within-person combinations of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism (i.e., pure SOP, mixed perfectionism, pure SPP, and nonperfectionism) can be distinctively associated with psychological adjustment. This study examined whether the relationship between the 4 subtypes of perfectionism proposed in the 2 Ã? 2 model (Gaudreau & Thompson, 2010) and academic outcomes (i.e., academic satisfaction and grade-point average [GPA]) differed across 2 sociocultural groups: Asian Canadians and European Canadians. A sample of 697 undergraduate students (23% Asian Canadians) completed self-report measures of dispositional perfectionism, academic satisfaction, and GPA. Results replicated most of the 2 Ã? 2 model's hypotheses on ratings of GPA, thus supporting that nonperfectionism was associated with lower GPA than pure SOP (Hypothesis 1a) but with higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 2). Results also showed that mixed perfectionism was related to higher GPA than pure SPP (Hypothesis 3) but to similar levels as pure SOP, thus disproving Hypothesis 4. Furthermore, results provided evidence for cross-cultural differences in academic satisfaction. While all 4 hypotheses were supported among European Canadians, only Hypotheses 1a and 3 were supported among Asian Canadians. Future lines of research are discussed in light of the importance of acknowledging the role of culture when studying the influence of dispositional perfectionism on academic outcomes.
PubMed ID
22731112 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158048
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Yasmin Asvat
Vanessa L Malcarne
Author Affiliation
San Diego State University, CA 92120-4913, USA.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Mass Screening
Parenting
Religion and Psychology
Social Identification
Social Values
Students - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime).
PubMed ID
22023606 View in PubMed
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Acculturation or development? Autonomy expectations among ethnic German immigrant adolescents and their native German age-mates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120815
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Sep-Oct;83(5):1640-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter F Titzmann
Rainer K Silbereisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Developmental Psychology, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Am Steiger 3 / 1, 07743 Jena, Germany. peter.titzmann@uni-jena.de
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Sep-Oct;83(5):1640-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Culture
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Germany
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Personal Autonomy
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
This longitudinal study compared immigrant and native adolescents' expectations concerning the timing of conventional socially acceptable and oppositional less socially acceptable forms of autonomy. Based on normative development and a collectivist background among immigrants, both developmental and acculturative change was expected. The sample consisted of 523 ethnic German immigrants from the former Soviet Union and 475 native German adolescents, both groups divided into an early (age 12.5years) and a late (age 16years) adolescent group. Results revealed more developmental than acculturative change, as immigrants and natives mostly showed a similar rate of change in autonomy expectations. Acculturative change was found only for oppositional autonomy among late adolescent immigrants, whose later expectations approached those of their native age-mates over time.
PubMed ID
22966928 View in PubMed
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Achieving high acceptability of HIV testing in a population-based survey among immigrants in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265149
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):393-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Paula J Tiittala
Pia S Kivelä
Matti A Ristola
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Päivikki M S Koponen
Mulki Mölsä
Jukka Ollgren
Kirsi Liitsola
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):393-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Communication Barriers
Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
HIV Infections - diagnosis
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the acceptability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing among migrants in Finland and the factors contributing to non-acceptance.
The Finnish Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study 'Maamu' was the first national population-based Health Interview and Examination Survey (HIS/HES) among migrants in Finland. A total of 386 Kurdish, Russian and Somali immigrants in Helsinki participated in the study.
Despite the participants' different sociodemographic backgrounds, a high rate of test acceptability (92%, 95% CI 90-95) was achieved. HIV test acceptance was associated with pretest counselling, ability to understand spoken Finnish or Swedish and employment status. No participants tested positive for HIV.
The results imply that a universal HIV testing strategy is well accepted in a low-HIV prevalence immigrant population and can be included in a general health examination in immigrant population-based surveys.
PubMed ID
25788469 View in PubMed
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Activity and obesity of Colombian immigrants in Canada who use a food bank.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159910
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Oct;105(2):681-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Victor Ng
Timothy J Rush
Meizi He
Jennifer D Irwin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario.
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 2007 Oct;105(2):681-7
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Aged
Colombia - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Exercise - psychology
Female
Food Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Ontario
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to provide some preliminary description of the Latin-Canadian community by reporting the socioeconomic status, physical activity, and weight status (i.e., healthy weight, overweight, or obese status) of Colombians newly immigrated to London, Ontario Canada. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on a convenience sample of 77 adult Colombian immigrant food bank users (46.8% men; mean age 39.9 yr., SD=11.8). Physical activity was gauged using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and self-report Body Mass Index, and sociodemographic data were collected. Of respondents, 47% had a university education, and 97% received social support. 61% met recommended levels of physical activity. Men were more active, being involved in about 130 min. more of exercise per week, and more men were overweight than women (63.9% versus 39.0%, respectively). Of respondents, 73% reported being less active than before coming to Canada. This pilot study indicates that Latin-Canadian immigrants are a vulnerable group in need of acculturational support. Further study is warranted.
PubMed ID
18065093 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' lifetime experience of selling sex: development over five years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114699
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2013;22(3):312-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Cecilia Fredlund
Frida Svensson
Carl Göran Svedin
Gisela Priebe
Marie Wadsby
Author Affiliation
Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Child Sex Abus. 2013;22(3):312-25
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Prostitution - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - ethnology
Time Factors
Abstract
Lifetime experience of selling sex among adolescents was investigated together with sociodemographic correlates, parent-child relationship, and the existence of people to confide in. Changes over time regarding the selling of sex were investigated through a comparison of data from 2004 and 2009. This study was carried out using 3,498 adolescents from a representative sample of Swedish high school students with a mean age 18.3 years. Of these adolescents, 1.5% stated that they had given sexual services for reimbursement and both male and female buyers existed. The adolescents who had sold sex had a poorer parent-child relationship during childhood and had fewer people to confide in about problems and worries. Changes over time were found especially regarding the Internet as a contact source and also immigrant background.
PubMed ID
23590352 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences among women prisoners: relationships to suicide attempts and drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256618
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Christine Friestad
Rustad Åse-Bente
Ellen Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
1Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Life Change Events
Likelihood Functions
Norway
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Statistics as Topic
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women prisoners are known to suffer from an accumulation of factors known to increase the risk for several major health problems. This study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the relationship between such experiences and suicide attempts and drug use among incarcerated women in Norway.
A total of 141 women inmates (75% of all eligible) were interviewed using a structured interview guide covering information on demographics and a range of ACE related to abuse and neglect, and household dysfunction. The main outcome variables were attempted suicide and adult drug abuse.
Emotional, physical and sexual abuse during childhood was experienced by 39%, 36% and 19%, respectively, and emotional and physical neglect by 31% and 33%, respectively. Looking at the full range of ACE, 17% reported having experienced none, while 34% reported having experienced more than five ACEs. After controlling for age, immigrant background and marital status, the number of ACEs significantly increased the risk of attempted suicide and current drug abuse.
The associations observed between early life trauma and later health risk behaviour indicate the need for early prevention. The findings also emphasize the important role of prison health services in secondary prevention among women inmates.
PubMed ID
23045353 View in PubMed
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African immigrant views of HIV service needs: gendered perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123737
Source
AIDS Care. 2013;25(1):103-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Catherine Worthington
David Este
Keri-Lynn Strain
Nedra Huffey
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Social Policy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. worthing@uvic.ca
Source
AIDS Care. 2013;25(1):103-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
HIV Infections - prevention & control - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
This qualitative, community-based research study explored the influence of gender on community perceptions of HIV/AIDS service needs among African immigrant men and women in Calgary, Canada. A total of 41 key informant participants (24 male, 17 female) from 14 sub-Saharan countries completed individual, semi-structured interviews. Thematic interview analysis results produced four themes directly related to HIV and gender, including different sexual standards for men and women, condom use, infidelity, and the need for dialogue between partners on sex and HIV. Each of these themes was related to a contextual theme of "family breakdown", which resulted from cultural adjustment challenges faced by African immigrants. For men, finding suitable employment was a key issue; for women, isolation was identified as an adjustment factor. The findings suggest that a more holistic conception of HIV prevention may be necessary for programmes to be successful and that HIV/AIDS services should be better integrated with newcomer services.
PubMed ID
22672154 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and social interactions among adolescents in Sweden: do peer effects exist within and/or between the majority population and immigrants?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97679
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Jun;70(11):1858-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Mikael Svensson
Author Affiliation
Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. mikael.svensson@oru.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Jun;70(11):1858-64
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Empirical Research
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Multilevel Analysis
Peer Group
Schools
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Are adolescents who attend schools with a high level of alcohol use and binge drinking more likely to use alcohol and binge drink themselves? This paper analyzes peer effects in adolescent drinking based on a survey of 13,070 adolescents conducted in Sweden in 2005. The empirical analysis uses a multi-level logistic model to account for non-observable heterogeneity between the schools and the results show that attending a school with a high level of alcohol use and frequent binge drinking is a strong predictor of alcohol use and binge drinking for the individual. Hardly any significant interaction effects are detected, implying that peer influence is similar across different adolescent sub-groups. Looking at adolescents with different ethnic backgrounds, it is found that the drinking-pattern of the Swedish majority population has a significant effect on drinking by Swedish individuals and immigrants from Nordic and European countries, but no effect on drinking by immigrants from non-European countries.
PubMed ID
20236746 View in PubMed
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277 records – page 1 of 28.