Skip header and navigation

Refine By

35 records – page 1 of 4.

[A crisis intervention service in an outpatient psychiatric clinic of a general hospital: function and clientele].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221532
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Mar;38(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
J P Fournier
F. Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Centre hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Ste-Foy, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Mar;38(2):96-100
Date
Mar-1993
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crisis Intervention
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Hospitals, General - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - utilization
Patient Care Team - utilization
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors describe an external crisis intervention service in a general hospital. This service is intended for a clientele presenting acute mental health problems, referred, in the majority of cases, from the emergency department. They present demographic data, diagnostic data, data on the factors precipitating the crises and data which can be used to qualify and quantify the clientele. In addition, they describe the therapeutic approach and the treatment philosophy, the number of follow-up sessions, and the guidance provided to the clientele after follow-up. Finally, the authors suggest prerequisites considered essential to the effective operation of a crisis intervention module in an external psychiatric clinic.
PubMed ID
8467450 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Alcohol abusers in the psychiatric emergency departments in Copenhagen and Frederiksberg]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12062
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 18;153(8):567-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-1991
Author
U. Søgaard
A S Naylor
J. Knop
F J Thusholt
E O Holm-Jensen
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet psykiatrisk afdeling O, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Feb 18;153(8):567-70
Date
Feb-18-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - psychology - therapy
Alcoholic Intoxication - psychology - therapy
Alcoholism - psychology - therapy
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - utilization
Psychoses, Alcoholic - psychology - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
On the basis of a prospective random sample investigation of 611 alcohol-related visits to the four psychiatric emergency units of the City of Copenhagen, demographic variables, referral sources and dispositions of treatment are described. On every 10th day throughout 1985 all visits were registered. The distribution of all variables except age and sex deviate significantly from those of non-alcohol-related visits. Thus fewer alcoholics cohabit and more are divorced. 25% of the alcohol-related visits resulted in an overnight stay in the unit, while 10% resulted in admission to the psychiatric ward. For non-alcohol-related visits the proportions were the reverse.
PubMed ID
2008741 View in PubMed
Less detail

An examination of the temporal and geographical patterns of psychiatric emergency service use by multiple visit patients as a means for their early detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160607
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2007;7:60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Yves J A Chaput
Marie-Josée Lebel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. yveschaput@bellnet.ca
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2007;7:60
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Canada - epidemiology
Early Diagnosis
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Geography
Hospitals, General
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Prevalence
Time Factors
Abstract
Frequent users of the psychiatric emergency service (PES) place a heavy burden upon the mental health care delivery system. The aim of this study was to identify distinct temporal or geographical patterns of PES use by these patients as potential markers for their early detection.
Diagnostic profiles were obtained for patients making an intermediate (4 to 10) or a high (11 or more) number of visits to a general hospital PES in Montreal (Canada) between 1985 and 2004. Between-group comparisons were made with regards to several parameters. These included the time intervals between consecutive visits, visit clustering (single, repeating, and the time interval to the first cluster) and visits made to three other services where data was similarly acquired from 2002 to 2004.
The two multiple visit groups differed with regards to diagnostic profiles and actual time between consecutive visits (significantly shorter in patients with 11 or more visits). Patients with 11 or more visits were more likely to have a single cluster (3 or more visits/3 months) or repeating clusters (4 visits/3 months) in their patterns of use. Personality disorders were more prevalent in patients with single clusters as they were, along with schizophrenia, in those with repeating clusters. In addition, clusters were found to occur sufficiently early so as to be potentially useful as markers for early detection. Ten percent of those with 11 or more visits and 16% of those with an intermediate number of visits frequented at least one other PES. A small number of patients, primarily those with substance abuse, made over 50% of their visits to other services.
Temporal and geographical patterns of use differed significantly between the multiple visit groups. These patterns, combined with distinct diagnostic profiles, could potentially lead to the more rapid identification and treatment of specific sub-groups of multiple visit patients.
Notes
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2000 Jun;7(6):637-4610905642
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Aug;52(8):535-817955917
Cites: Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1987 Apr;38(4):401-53570189
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1992 Mar;37(2):91-51562965
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1992 Mar;37(2):96-91348658
Cites: Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1993 Apr;44(4):376-808462947
Cites: Sante Ment Que. 1993 Spring;18(1):227-508218660
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 1997 Jul;48(7):942-59219304
Cites: Ann Clin Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;10(4):151-59988055
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2005 Jun;56(6):678-8415939943
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2005 Jun;56(6):691-815939945
Cites: CNS Spectr. 2006 Sep;11(9):704-10; quiz 71916946695
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2007 Mar;58(3):335-4117325106
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;190:210-617329740
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2007 Aug;101(1-3):187-9317254637
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2003 May;41(5):659-6712712033
PubMed ID
17963530 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Are immigrants admitted to emergency psychiatric departments more often than ethnic Norwegians?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9520
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Mar 4;124(5):634-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2004
Author
John E Berg
Einar Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Klinikk for psykiatri, Lovisenberg Diakonale Sykehus. john.berg@ahus.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Mar 4;124(5):634-6
Date
Mar-4-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Commitment of Mentally Ill - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Crisis Intervention - statistics & numerical data
Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - utilization
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Refugees - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Immigrants from non-Western countries occupy a fifth of the beds in an acute psychiatric department. There is a prevailing clinical impression that they have higher morbidity than the traditional Norwegian population. MATERIAL: A one-year cohort of patients, n = 415, was retrospectively investigated, 80 of whom had a non-Western background. RESULTS: The proportion of immigrant patients from the department's catchment area was 49 in 10 000, compared to 52 in 10 000 for traditional Norwegian patients, p = 0.72. Significantly more of the immigrants were men, they were younger, they got more compulsory treatment, and more often a diagnosis of psychosis, but they had less substance abuse problems. Suicidality was evenly distributed in both groups. INTERPRETATION: Our clinical impression of a higher frequency of referral of immigrants was not substantiated. However, it is suggested that immigrants have greater difficulties in presenting their psychiatric problems to a general practitioner; hence they probably develop more severe symptoms before referral. The low incidence of referral of female immigrants could indicate a higher level of functioning, or cultural barriers to exhibiting problems.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 May 6;124(9):1278; author reply 127815131720
PubMed ID
15004607 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A study from 3 different health care areas: the disease panorama in emergency psychiatry is homogeneous both geographically and socially].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235694
Source
Lakartidningen. 1987 Jan 14;84(3):134, 136-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-1987

[Changes in the function of a psychiatric department during 1983-1988].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229273
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Apr 9;152(15):1075-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-9-1990
Author
E S Schepelern
W. Kjaerager
P. Musenfryd
K H Aggernaes
Author Affiliation
Frederiksberg Hospital, Psykiatrisk Afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Apr 9;152(15):1075-7
Date
Apr-9-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - therapy
Denmark
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - utilization
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - utilization
Psychoses, Substance-Induced - therapy
Substance-Related Disorders - therapy
Abstract
From 18.4.1988 to 17.6.1988, 374 emergency referrals were registered and 495 other referrals to the psychiatric admission department, Frederiksberg Hospital. The two main reasons for the referrals, in both men and women, were alcoholism and/or psychosis. Compared to a similar study from the same period in 1983, the number of emergency referrals was stabilized while the number of other referrals increased by 63%. The majority of the 495 other referrals were chronic psychotic patients and/or addicts who were, as a rule, already under treatment in the day-care hospital or out-patient clinic. Previously, part of this group of patients remained in state mental institutions for long periods. After the change to district psychiatric treatment, the admission department acts as a semi-acute asylum, since suitable resorts outside the psychiatric institution are not available.
PubMed ID
2330626 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children and adolescents in the Psychiatric Emergency Department: a 10-year survey in Copenhagen County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257845
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):385-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Annette Taastrøm
Julie Klahn
Nina Staal
Per Hove Thomsen
Anders Johansen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Child and Adolescents Psychiatry , Glostrup, Copenhagen , Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Aug;68(6):385-90
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Abstract
Knowledge on psychiatric emergencies in children and adolescents is limited. The Psychiatric Emergency Departments (PED) in Copenhagen enable the acute examination of children and adolescents 24 h a day, 7 days a week. However, very little is known about who presents to the PED, and the reason for their visit.
To describe the prevalence and characteristics of presentations in PED and treatment provided.
A retrospective population based study comprising data of more than 4000 visitors presenting to PED from 2001-2010. In 2003 and 2006, two randomly chosen years, a more thorough analysis was performed, based on the individual emergency charts. Inter-rater reliability was high.
Visits increased nearly threefold during the period. Symptom score for 2003 and 2006 revealed that more than one third of the visitors had suicidal ideation. Depressive and anxiety symptoms together with suicidal ideation rose significantly (P
PubMed ID
24161251 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Compulsory admissions for observation in emergency psychiatric departments--discharge next day?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185477
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Apr 3;123(7):917-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-2003

[Compulsory medical treatment in an emergency psychiatric department].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185476
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Apr 3;123(7):921-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-2003

Demographic and clinical profiles of patients who make multiple visits to psychiatric emergency services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164958
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2007 Mar;58(3):335-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Yves J A Chaput
Marie-Josée Lebel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, 365 rue Normand, Suite 230, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada J3A 1T6. yves.chaput@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2007 Mar;58(3):335-41
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Cohort Studies
Demography
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Abstract
The study identified clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of patients making multiple visits to a psychiatric emergency service.
Information was obtained for patients visiting a hospital psychiatric emergency service in Montreal from 1985 to 2000. Profiles were determined for four groups: one visit, two visits, three to ten visits, and 11 or more visits. To determine whether the profile for those with 11 or more visits was generalizable, data for patients visiting the main site and three other such services from 2002 to 2004 were similarly analyzed.
At the main study site (1985 to 2000), patients with single visits accounted for 36% of the 29,569 visits. The 292 patients with 11 or more visits accounted for almost 21% of total visits. Timing of the visit-time of day and day of the week-did not differentiate between groups. However, time itself was important in identifying patients with 11 or more visits: use of 30-month observation periods resulted in identification of only 8% of this group. Patients with 11 or more visits were more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia and as having a comorbid diagnosis and were generally younger at the index visit and more economically impaired than those in the other groups. Overall, and at two of the three other sites, schizophrenia was overrepresented in the highest user group.
Most visits to the psychiatric emergency service were made by frequent users who had distinctive profiles, which are potentially useful for developing clinical strategies to reduce the impact of this patient group on this service.
PubMed ID
17325106 View in PubMed
Less detail

35 records – page 1 of 4.