Skip header and navigation

Refine By

359 records – page 1 of 36.

[A care program for traffic accidents. An American model for improvement of trauma care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217703
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2792-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994

[A casualty department study in the western part of the county of Frederiksborg. II. Accident epidemiology]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39764
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1984 Sep 19;146(38):2900-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-1984

[A casualty department study in the western part of the county of Frederiksborg. I. Registration of the number of contacts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240102
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1984 Sep 19;146(38):2895-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-1984

Access to heart failure care post emergency department visit: do we meet established benchmarks and does it matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114344
Source
Am Heart J. 2013 May;165(5):725-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Debbie Ehrmann Feldman
Thao Huynh
Julie Des Lauriers
Nadia Giannetti
Marc Frenette
François Grondin
Caroline Michel
Richard Sheppard
Martine Montigny
Serge Lepage
Viviane Nguyen
Hassan Behlouli
Louise Pilote
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. debbie.feldman@umontreal.ca
Source
Am Heart J. 2013 May;165(5):725-32
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Benchmarking
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Heart Failure - therapy
Humans
Male
Office Visits - utilization
Quebec
Abstract
The Canadian Cardiology Society recommends that patients should be seen within 2 weeks after an emergency department (ED) visit for heart failure (HF). We sought to investigate whether patients who had an ED visit for HF subsequently consult a physician within the current established benchmark, to explore factors related to physician consultation, and to examine whether delay in consultation is associated with adverse events (AEs) (death, hospitalization, or repeat ED visit).
Patients were recruited by nurses at 8 hospital EDs in Québec, Canada, and interviewed by telephone within 6 weeks of discharge and subsequently at 3 and 6 months. Clinical variables were extracted from medical charts by nurses. We used Cox regression in the analysis.
We enrolled 410 patients (mean age 74.9 ± 11.1 years, 53% males) with a confirmed primary diagnosis of HF. Only 30% consulted with a physician within 2 weeks post-ED visit. By 4 weeks, 51% consulted a physician. Over the 6-month follow-up, 26% returned to the ED, 25% were hospitalized, and 9% died. Patients who were followed up within 4 weeks were more likely to be older and have higher education and a worse quality of life. Patients who consulted a physician within 4 weeks of ED discharge had a lower risk of AEs (hazard ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-0.99).
Prompt follow-up post-ED visit for HF is associated with lower risk for major AEs. Therefore, adherence to current HF guideline benchmarks for timely follow-up post-ED visit is crucial.
PubMed ID
23622909 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental injuries among older adults: An incidence study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297612
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 09; 40:12-17
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Maria Gudnadottir
Thordis Katrin Thorsteinsdottir
Brynjolfur Mogensen
Thor Aspelund
Edda Bjork Thordardottir
Author Affiliation
Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: maria.gudnadottir@gmail.com.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 09; 40:12-17
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Geriatrics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
To date, the majority of studies assessing accidental injuries among the elderly have focused on fall injuries, while studies of other mechanisms of injuries have been lacking. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate all injury-related visits among older adults to an emergency department and risk factors for injuries.
Data were collected on all registered visits of adults, =67?years old, living in the capital of Iceland, to the emergency department of Landspitali, the National University Hospital, in 2011 and 2012.
The yearly incidence rate for injuries was 106 per 1000 adults, =67?years old. Of all injuries (n?=?4,469), falls were the most common mechanism of injury (78 per 1000), followed by being struck or hit (12 per 1000) and being crushed, cut or pierced (8 per 1000). Other mechanisms of injury, such as acute overexertion, foreign body in natural orifice, injuries caused by thermal and chemical effect and other and unspecified mechanism were less common (8 per 1000). Fractures were the most common consequences of injuries (36 per 1000). The most frequent place of injury was in or around homes (77 per 1000), with men being more likely than women to be injured outside of the home (60 per 1000 vs. 36 per 1000).
Results indicate that falls are the main cause of accidental injuries, followed by being struck and hit injuries but other causes contributed to the rest. Falls constitute a major public health problem and fall-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the lives of older adults. As life expectancy continues to increase, fall risk is expected to increase. Since falls constitute a major impact on the lives of older adults and can lead to not only declines in physical activity and functional status, but to considerable health care costs, the health care system needs to intervene.
PubMed ID
29661594 View in PubMed
Less detail

Actual clinical leadership: a shadowing study of charge nurses and doctors on-call in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298343
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2019 Jan 08; 27(1):2
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-08-2019
Author
Sissel Eikeland Husebø
Øystein Evjen Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Quality and Health Technology, Faculty of Health Science, University of Stavanger, 4036, Stavanger, Norway. sissel.i.husebo@uis.no.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2019 Jan 08; 27(1):2
Date
Jan-08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital
Norway
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Nursing, Supervisory
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Abstract
The provision of safe, high quality healthcare in the Emergency Department (ED) requires frontline healthcare personnel with sufficient competence in clinical leadership. However, healthcare education curriculum infrequently features learning about clinical leadership, and there is an absence of experienced doctors and nurses as role models in EDs for younger and less experienced doctors and nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the activities performed by clinical leaders and to identify similarities and differences between the activities performed by charge nurses and those performed by doctors on-call in the Emergency Department after completion of a Clinical Leadership course.
A qualitative exploratory design was chosen. Nine clinical leaders in the ED were shadowed. The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis.
The analysis revealed seven themes: receiving an overview of the team and patients and planning the shift; ensuring resources; monitoring and ensuring appropriate patient flow; monitoring and securing information flow; securing patient care and treatment; securing and assuring the quality of diagnosis and treatment of patient; and securing the prioritization of patients. The last two themes were exclusive to doctors on-call, while the theme "securing patient care and treatment" was exclusive to charge nurses.
Charge nurses and doctors on-call perform multitasking and complement each other as clinical leaders in the ED. The findings in this study provide new insights into how clinical leadership is performed by charge nurses and doctors on-call in the ED, but also the similarities and differences that exist in clinical leadership performance between the two professions. Clinical leadership is necessary to the provision of safe, high quality care and treatment for patients with acute health needs, as well as the coordination of healthcare services in the ED. More evaluation studies of this Clinical Leadership course would be valuable.
PubMed ID
30621752 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute care surgery: a new strategy for the general surgery patients left behind.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144682
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Apr;53(2):84-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Chad G Ball
S Morad Hameed
Frederick D Brenneman
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA. ball.chad@gmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Apr;53(2):84-5
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
General Surgery
Humans
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Traumatology
Notes
Cites: J Trauma. 2003 Apr;54(4):795-712707548
Cites: J Trauma. 2005 Mar;58(3):614-615761359
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2009 Feb;53(2):198-20718439724
Cites: Am Surg. 2007 Feb;73(2):157-6017305294
Cites: Surgery. 2007 Mar;141(3):297-817349834
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2006 Apr;202(4):655-6716571438
PubMed ID
20334739 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute care surgery: the impact of an acute care surgery service on assessment, flow, and disposition in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126302
Source
Am J Surg. 2012 May;203(5):578-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Chad G Ball
Anthony R MacLean
Elijah Dixon
May Lynn Quan
Lynn Nicholson
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Francis R Sutherland
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403 29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ball.chad@gmail.com
Source
Am J Surg. 2012 May;203(5):578-83
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Critical Care - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Treatment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Acute care surgery (ACS) services are becoming increasingly popular.
Assessment, flow, and disposition of adult ACS patients (acute, nontrauma surgical conditions) through the emergency department (ED) in a large health care system (Calgary) were prospectively analyzed.
Among 447 ACS ED consultations over 3 centers (70% admitted to ACS), the median wait time from the consultation request to ACS arrival was 36 minutes, and from ACS arrival to the admission request it was 91 minutes. The total ACS-dependent time was 127 minutes compared with 261 minutes for initial ED activities and 104 minutes for transfer to a hospital ward (P
PubMed ID
22402265 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A department for less serious emergencies but with heavy nursing needs. Increased cooperation resulted in shorter length of stay].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217706
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2764-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994

359 records – page 1 of 36.