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9 records – page 1 of 1.

[Are specialists in acute medicine needed in Sweden?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204870
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jul 8;95(28-29):3156-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-1998
Author
L. Lind
M O Mattsson
T. Olsson
U. Säfvenberg
Author Affiliation
Akutmedicin, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jul 8;95(28-29):3156-7
Date
Jul-8-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - standards
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower - standards
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
9700253 View in PubMed
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[Does Sweden need emergency medicine specialists? Yes, but there are conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197043
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Aug 30;97(35):3785-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2000
Author
L. Lind
A. Terént
Author Affiliation
Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala. lars.lind@medsci.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Aug 30;97(35):3785-6
Date
Aug-30-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Medical Services - manpower
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
11016238 View in PubMed
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[Emergency medical services require stronger resources when it comes to internal medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189234
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Jun 20;99(25):2858-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2002

Emergency medicine practice and training in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185020
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Jun 10;168(12):1549-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2003
Author
Ivan P Steiner
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. ivan.steiner@ualberta.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Jun 10;168(12):1549-50
Date
Jun-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - trends
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - trends
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Family Practice - education
Humans
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Oct 15;167(8):869-7012406944
Cites: J Emerg Med. 1994 Jul-Aug;12(4):559-657963406
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2002 May;39(5):510-2711973558
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2002 Jul;40(1):3-1512085066
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2003 Jul;10(7):731-712837647
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 2;169(5):389; author reply 391-212952792
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 2;169(5):389-91; author reply 391-212952793
PubMed ID
12796335 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors influencing rural versus metropolitan work choices for emergency physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149108
Source
Emerg Med Australas. 2009 Aug;21(4):323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Robert Meek
Steven Doherty
Adrienne Deans
Author Affiliation
Emergency Department, Dandenong Hospital, Victoria, Australia. robertmeek66@hotmail.com
Source
Emerg Med Australas. 2009 Aug;21(4):323-8
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Australasia
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Female
Hospitals, Rural - manpower
Hospitals, Urban - manpower
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Questionnaires
Abstract
To survey Fellows of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (FACEM) on how a range of factors influenced their decision to accept their most recent position. To compare this information between rural and metropolitan FACEM.
Analytical cross-sectional survey of FACEM. Sections included baseline demographics and a range of questions regarding the presence, absence and influence of 14 professional and 12 personal/external factors on the decision to accept their current position.
Questionnaires were returned by 498 (61.9%) of 805 FACEM. Eighty-seven (18.4%) were currently employed in rural areas. Rural FACEM were more likely to be male (odds ratio 2.0 [95% CI 1.1-3.9]) and to have worked for >12 months as a registrar in a rural hospital (odds ratio 4.5 [95% CI 2.2-9.1]). Negative influences for FACEM accepting rural positions included lack of access to continuing education, less acceptable on-call arrangements, fewer employment opportunities for their partner and less educational opportunities for their children. Positive influences included acceptable remuneration, desirable lifestyle, a higher indigenous caseload and more affordable housing.
The influence of different types of factors appears to differ between rural and metropolitan FACEM and this information might assist in the formulation of strategies aimed at increasing the rural workforce.
PubMed ID
19682019 View in PubMed
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[Intensive training during emergency service. Systemic evaluation as a tool for increasing the value of education during emergency service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197303
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Aug 21;162(34):4549-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2000
Author
A. Kofoed-Enevoldsen
Author Affiliation
Intern medicinsk afdeling E, Amtssygehuset i Herlev. ake@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Aug 21;162(34):4549-51
Date
Aug-21-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Education, Medical
Education, Medical, Continuing
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Preceptorship
PubMed ID
10981224 View in PubMed
Less detail

Paramedics' and pre-hospital physicians' assessments of anatomic injury in trauma patients: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139158
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Hetti Kirves
Lauri Handolin
Mika Niemelä
Janne Pitkäniemi
Tarja Randell
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. hetti.kirves@hus.fi
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:60
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - organization & administration
Emergency Medical Technicians - education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Physicians - standards - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Trauma Centers - manpower - organization & administration
Trauma Severity Indices
Triage - methods
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - diagnosis
Abstract
The pre-hospital assessment of a blunt trauma is difficult. Common triage tools are the mechanism of injury (MOI), vital signs, and anatomic injury (AI). Compared to the other tools, the clinical assessment of anatomic injury is more subjective than the others, and, hence, more dependent on the skills of the personnel.The aim of the study was to estimate whether the training and qualifications of the personnel are associated with the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury and the completion of pre-hospital procedures indicated by local guidelines.
Adult trauma patients met by a trauma team at Helsinki University Trauma Centre during a 12-month period (n = 422) were retrospectively analysed. To evaluate the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury, clinically assessed pre-hospital injuries in six body regions were compared to injuries assessed at hospital in two patient groups, the patients treated by pre-hospital physicians (group 1, n = 230) and those treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 190).
The groups were comparable in respect to age, sex, and MOI, but the patients treated by physicians were more severely injured than those treated by paramedics [ISS median (interquartile range) 16 (6-26) vs. 6 (2-10)], thus rendering direct comparison of the groups ineligible. The positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) of assessed injury were highest in head injury [0,91 (0,84-0,95) in group 1 and 0,86 (0,77-0,92) in group 2]. The negative predictive values were highest in abdominal injury [0,85 (0,79-0,89) in group 1 and 0,90 (0,84-0,93) in group 2]. The measurements of agreement between injuries assessed pre- and in-hospitally were moderate in thoracic and extremity injuries. Substantial kappa values (95% confidence interval) were achieved in head injury, 0,67 (0,57-0,77) in group 1 and 0,63 (0,52-0,74) in group 2. The rate of performing the pre-hospital procedures as indicated by the local instructions was 95-99%, except for decompression of tension pneumothorax.
Accurate prediction of anatomic injury is challenging. No conclusive differences were seen in the ability of pre-hospital physicians and paramedics to predict anatomic injury in the respective patient populations.
Notes
Cites: J Trauma. 2010 Feb;68(2):452-6220154558
Cites: Injury. 2009 Nov;40 Suppl 4:S23-619895949
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2004 Jan;11(1):1-914709422
Cites: Resuscitation. 2004 Mar;60(3):279-8215050759
Cites: J Trauma. 1974 Mar;14(3):187-964814394
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74843571
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 1998 Sep;7(3):301-179803527
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jan 26;354(4):366-7816436768
Cites: J Trauma. 2006 Aug;61(2):268-7116917438
Cites: J Trauma. 2006 Nov;61(5):1228-3317099534
Cites: Resuscitation. 2007 Jan;72(1):11-2517118508
Cites: Am J Surg. 2007 May;193(5):630-4; discussion 634-517434371
Cites: J Trauma. 2007 Aug;63(2):326-3017693831
Cites: Injury. 2007 Sep;38(9):993-100017640641
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Mar;64(3):754-6018332820
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 22;178(9):1141-5218427089
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009;17:119134177
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2009;17:1219265550
Cites: Am Surg. 2009 Oct;75(10):1009-1419886155
Cites: Resuscitation. 2001 Sep;50(3):263-7211719155
PubMed ID
21092167 View in PubMed
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Preparing emergency physicians for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185021
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Jun 10;168(12):1548-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2003
Author
James Ducharme
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Saint John, NB. DUCJI@reg2.health.nb.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Jun 10;168(12):1548-9
Date
Jun-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - trends
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - trends
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Humans
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 2;169(5):389-91; author reply 391-212952793
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Sep 2;169(5):389; author reply 391-212952792
PubMed ID
12796334 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.