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157 records – page 1 of 16.

Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jun 25;152(26):1881
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-25-1990

Adult and pediatric fellowship programs in critical care medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245319
Source
Crit Care Med. 1980 Nov;8(11):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980

Airway management by US and Canadian emergency medicine residents: a multicenter analysis of more than 6,000 endotracheal intubation attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172707
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2005 Oct;46(4):328-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Mark J Sagarin
Erik D Barton
Yi-Mei Chng
Ron M Walls
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2005 Oct;46(4):328-36
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Obstruction - therapy
Canada
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Cricoid Cartilage - surgery
Educational Status
Emergency Medicine - education - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Intubation, Intratracheal - methods - statistics & numerical data
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Thyroid Cartilage - surgery
United States
Abstract
We determine success rates of endotracheal intubation performed in emergency departments (EDs) by North American emergency medicine residents.
During 58 months, physicians performing intubations at 31 university-affiliated EDs in 3 nations completed a data form that was entered into the National Emergency Airway Registry 2 database. Included were all patients undergoing endotracheal intubation in the ED. The data form included patients' age, sex, weight, indication for intubation, technique of airway management, names and dosages of all medications used to facilitate intubation, level of training and specialty of the intubator, number of attempts, success or failure, and adverse events. We queried this prospectively gathered, observational data to analyze intubations done by US and Canadian emergency medicine residents.
Enrollment was incomplete (eg, 85% at the main study center), so the study sample did not include all consecutive patients. Emergency medicine residents performed 77% (5768/7498; 95% confidence interval [CI] 76% to 78%) of all initial intubation attempts in the United States and Canada. The first intubator was successful in 90% (5,193/5,757; 95% CI 89% to 91%) of cases, including 83% (4,775/5,757; 95% CI 82% to 84%) on the first attempt. Success rates on the first attempt were as follows: postgraduate year 1 = 72% (498/692; 95% CI 68% to 75%), postgraduate year 2 = 82% (2,081/2,544; 95% CI 80% to 83%), postgraduate year 3 = 88% (1,963/2,238; 95% CI 86% to 89%), postgraduate year 4+ = 82% (233/283; 95% CI 77% to 87%), and attending physician = 89% (689/772; 95% CI 87% to 91%). Success rates by the first intubator were as follows: postgraduate year 1 = 80% (553/692; 95% CI 77% to 83%), postgraduate year 2 = 89% (2,272/2,544; 95% CI 88% to 90%), postgraduate year 3 = 94% (2,105/2,238; 95% CI 93% to 95%), postgraduate year 4+ = 93% (263/283; 95% CI 89% to 96%), and attending physician = 98% (755/772; 95% CI 96% to 99%). Rapid sequence intubation technique was used in 78% (4,513/5,768; 95% CI 77% to 79%) of initial attempts: it resulted in 85% (3,843/4,513; 95% CI 84% to 86%) success on the first attempt and 91% (4,117/4,513; 95% CI 90% to 92%) success by the first intubator. The overall rate of cricothyrotomy for all emergency resident intubations was 0.9% (50/5,757; 95% CI 0.6% to 1.1%). When an initial intubator failed, 40% (385/954; 95% CI 37% to 44%) of rescue attempts were performed by emergency medicine residents. Among emergency medicine residents, success on the first rescue attempt was 80% (297/371; 95% CI 76% to 84%), and success by the first rescue intubator was 88% (328/371; 95% CI 85% to 91%).
Success of initial intubation attempts increased over the first 3 years of residency. This large multicenter study demonstrates the success of airway management by emergency medicine residents in North America. Using rapid-sequence intubation predominantly, emergency medicine residents achieved high levels of success.
PubMed ID
16187466 View in PubMed
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[Ambulance services for patients with acute cardiac conditions in Denmark--current state]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55347
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jun 25;152(26):1892-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-25-1990
Author
H. Lybecker
C F Larsen
J R Nielsen
T. Haghfelt
Author Affiliation
Odense Sygehus, Anaestesiologisk afdeling V.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jun 25;152(26):1892-5
Date
Jun-25-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - standards
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration - standards
Emergency Medicine - education
English Abstract
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Patient Education
Abstract
In 1985, the Danish Board of Health published a review of the therapeutic value of heart ambulances. A report is presented here concerning the extent to which prehospital treatment of cardiac arrest recommended by the Board of Health has been intensified after publication of the review. The prehospital treatment of cardiac arrest has been intensified in four counties and in the municipalities of Copenhagen and Frederiksberg whereas it has not been altered in the remaining ten counties. Recent Danish investigations have demonstrated better prognosis both as regards survival and as regards recovery when intensified prehospital treatment of cardiac arrest is employed. Hence legislation steps should be taken to improve pre-hospital treatment of cardiac arrest.
PubMed ID
2363224 View in PubMed
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An introduction to disaster medicine in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215688
Source
J Emerg Med. 1995 Mar-Apr;13(2):211-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. de Boer
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery-Traumatology, Free University Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
J Emerg Med. 1995 Mar-Apr;13(2):211-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disaster planning
Disasters
Education, Medical, Graduate
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Emergency Medicine - education
Humans
International Cooperation
Netherlands
Red Cross
Relief Work
Sweden
Transportation of Patients
Triage
Abstract
Disaster medicine, which is based primarily on military and emergency medicine, is a young branch on the old tree of medicine. It touches on various disciplines within and outside the medical field. The subject is being taught on the academic and postacademic levels at many universities throughout Europe. The first chair in disaster medicine was established in Linkoping, Sweden; the second is now in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Some aspects of disaster medicine specifically oriented toward Europe are presented.
Notes
Comment In: J Emerg Med. 1996 Jan-Feb;14(1):978655949
Comment In: J Emerg Med. 1996 Jan-Feb;14(1):988655950
PubMed ID
7775793 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Are specialists in acute medicine needed in Sweden?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204870
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jul 8;95(28-29):3156-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-1998
Author
L. Lind
M O Mattsson
T. Olsson
U. Säfvenberg
Author Affiliation
Akutmedicin, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jul 8;95(28-29):3156-7
Date
Jul-8-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - standards
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower - standards
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
9700253 View in PubMed
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Assessing the need for communication training for specialists in poison information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149805
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2009 Jul;47(6):584-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Sally Planalp
Barbara Crouch
Erin Rothwell
Lee Ellington
Author Affiliation
Department of Communication, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. sally.planalp@utah.edu
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2009 Jul;47(6):584-9
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Education, Nursing
Education, Pharmacy
Emergency Medicine - education - organization & administration - standards
Focus Groups - methods
Humans
Information Services - standards
Physician-Patient Relations
Poison Control Centers
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
Effective communication has been shown to be essential to physician-patient communication and may be even more critical for poison control center (PCC) calls because of the absence of visual cues, the need for quick and accurate information exchange, and possible suboptimal conditions such as call surges. Professionals who answer poison control calls typically receive extensive training in toxicology but very little formal training in communication.
An instrument was developed to assess the perceived need for communication training for specialists in poison information (SPIs) with input from focus groups and a panel of experts. Requests to respond to an online questionnaire were made to PCCs throughout the United States and Canada.
The 537 respondents were 70% SPIs or poison information providers (PIPs), primarily educated in nursing or pharmacy, working across the United States and Canada, and employed by their current centers an average of 10 years. SPIs rated communication skills as extremely important to securing positive outcomes for PCC calls even though they reported that their own training was not strongly focused on communication and existing training in communication was perceived as only moderately useful. Ratings of the usefulness of 21 specific training units were consistently high, especially for new SPIs but also for experienced SPIs. Directors rated the usefulness of training for experienced SPIs higher for 5 of the 21 challenges compared to the ratings of SPIs.
Findings support the need for communication training for SPIs and provide an empirical basis for setting priorities in developing training units.
PubMed ID
19586357 View in PubMed
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Assessment of objectives of post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195753
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J B Epstein
A. Tejani
P. Glassman
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Centre, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada.
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Dental
Canada
Clinical Competence
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dental Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Education, Dental, Graduate - organization & administration
Emergency Medicine - education
Endodontics - education
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Oral Medicine - education
Organizational Objectives
Orthodontics - education
Pathology, Oral - education
Pediatric Dentistry - education
Periodontics - education
Pharmacology - education
Practice Management, Dental
Preventive Dentistry - education
Primary Health Care
Prosthodontics - education
Public Health Dentistry - education
Questionnaires
Surgery, Oral - education
United States
Abstract
Objectives of hospital-based post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada were assessed by questionnaire. Seventy percent (14 of 20) of the program directors responded. Educational goals and objectives were assessed in professional skills and practice management, public health and preventive dentistry, oral medicine and pathology, special needs patient care, trauma and emergency care, restorative/prosthodontic care, endodontics, orthodontics/pediatric dentistry, oral surgery, periodontics, pharmacology, and functioning in a hospital. High rankings of proficiency were related to primary care, restorative/prosthodontic, endodontic, and surgical care. Emergency care, sedation, and pharmacology were also ranked highly. Lower rankings of proficiency were reported in orthodontics, aspects of public health dentistry, practice management, and advanced oral and maxiliofacial surgery. When the results of the Canadian survey were compared with those of a survey of US post-doctoral general dentistry programs, substantial similarity was seen. The findings support continuing reciprocity in accreditation standards between the Canadian and American Commissions on Dental Education and Dental Accreditation.
PubMed ID
11203897 View in PubMed
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[A trauma course for medical students prepares physicians for emergency service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200564
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 15;96(37):3911-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1999
Author
M. Hallén
B. Pålsson
P. Lindblom
H. Kiotseridis
E. Ribbe
R. Andersson
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för kirurgi och gastroenterologi, Universitetssjukhuset, Lund.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 15;96(37):3911-2
Date
Sep-15-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Clerkship
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical
Emergency Medicine - education
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Sweden
Traumatology - education
PubMed ID
10522099 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation care: challenges in clinical practice and educational needs assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136937
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):98-104
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Author
Suzanne Murray
Patrice Lazure
Carolyn Pullen
Paule Maltais
Paul Dorian
Author Affiliation
AXDEV Group Inc., Brossard, Québec, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jan-Feb;27(1):98-104
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Canada
Cardiology - education
Catheter Ablation
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Data Collection
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Medical, Continuing
Emergency Medicine - education
Evidence-Based Medicine
Family Practice - education
Female
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Male
Middle Aged
Neurology - education
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
Current debates around the choice of management strategy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) combined with limited efficacy and frequent adverse effects of current pharmacotherapies cause uncertainty and confusion, challenging optimal care delivery to AF patients.
To determine gaps in knowledge, skill, and competencies of Canadian physicians caring for patients with AF as well as underlying causes of these gaps.
A mixed-method approach --consisting of qualitative (semistructured interviews) and quantitative data collection techniques (online survey) --was conducted. Findings were triangulated to ensure the reliability and trustworthiness of findings. The combined sample (n = 161) included 43 family physicians/general practitioners, 23 internal medicine specialists, 48 cardiologists, 28 emergency physicians, 14 neurologists, and 5 patients.
Gaps and barriers impeding optimal care were related to an unclear definition of AF, uncertainty of its pathophysiology, and knowledge gaps across the care continuum, including screening, diagnosis, and treatment. Clinical decision-making, individualized patient therapy, communication with patients and between professionals, and application of guidelines were found to be particularly challenging. These issues are discussed in the context of the newly revised Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) AF Guidelines.
Educational gaps exist across the entire continuum of care. Results from this study, along with the 2011 CCS guidelines for AF management, provide direction for solutions through physician education and professional development.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):388
PubMed ID
21329867 View in PubMed
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157 records – page 1 of 16.