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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Changes in treatment and outcomes of children receiving care in the intensive care unit for severe acute asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205703
Source
Pediatr Emerg Care. 1998 Apr;14(2):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
J. Pirie
P. Cox
D. Johnson
S. Schuh
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Emerg Care. 1998 Apr;14(2):104-8
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Albuterol - therapeutic use
Asthma - classification - therapy
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Child
Emergency Medical Services - trends
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Infant
Intensive Care - trends
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Significant changes have occurred in the intensity of treatment of children with severe asthma in the last decade. The objectives of this study are 1) to describe the changes in treatment of asthmatic children needing care in the intensive care unit (ICU) initially treated in our emergency department (ED) in 1983 to 1985 (I) and in 1990 to 1992 (II), and 2) to examine if these changes correspond to changes in clinical outcomes.
Retrospective descriptive study.
All asthmatic children less than 18 years old treated in the ED and admitted to the ICU directly or via the ward with a primary diagnosis of asthma.
Pediatric tertiary care hospital.
A total of 89 ICU admissions were required for patients initially treated in our ED, 54 in 1983 to 1985 and 35 in 1990 to 1992. In 1985, 29.7% of asthma patients required hospital admission and 0.5% needed ICU admission, while 30.7 and 0.7% required hospital and ICU admission, respectively, in 1992. Admissions to the ICU directly via the ED were similar in both time periods (I, 27; II, 30), while those admitted to the ICU via the ward decreased significantly (I, 27; II, 5; P
PubMed ID
9583389 View in PubMed
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Disaster medicine--reflections on goals and developments. The future of emergency and disaster medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194156
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2001 Jun;8(2):137-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001

[Emergency geriatrics--future offer to the elderly medical patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144675
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Mar 22;172(12):953
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-22-2010
Author
Lars Erik Matzen
Lillian Mørch Jørgensen
Hanne Pedersen
Solveig Henneberg
Else Marie Damsgaard
Finn Rønholt
Author Affiliation
Geriatrisk Afdeling G, Odense Universitetshospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. lars.matzen@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Mar 22;172(12):953
Date
Mar-22-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - trends
Geriatric Nursing - trends
Geriatrics - trends
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Humans
PubMed ID
20334787 View in PubMed
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Experience With a Novel, Global, Open-Access Template for Major Incidents: Qualitative Feasibility Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291769
Source
Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2017 08; 11(4):403-406
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Sabina Fattah
Kari Milch Agledahl
Marius Rehn
Torben Wisborg
Author Affiliation
1Department of Research and Development,Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation,Drøbak,Norway.
Source
Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2017 08; 11(4):403-406
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Access to Information
Checklist - methods - standards
Chile
Consensus
Emergency Medical Services - trends
Feasibility Studies
Finland
Humans
Norway
Qualitative Research
United Kingdom
Abstract
The transfer of experiences gained after prehospital medical responses to major incidents has largely been nonsystematic, and better-structured reporting methods have been advocated. A consensus-based template was recently created and implemented as an open-access website. This qualitative study assessed the feasibility of using the template and reporting site.
Informants who had used or who had been asked to use the template were interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the transcripts were analyzed by using an inductive approach based on grounded theory methodology.
The major theme identified was a need for "defining purpose" as explained by the minor themes "relevance," "scope," "resources," and "usefulness." Informants reported that the template content needed to be revised and that the scope and rationale behind each question should be conveyed to the user. Resources necessary for reporting and clarity regarding the aim and outcome also need to be communicated to users and policy-makers. The interface between informants and the template is critical.
Informants considered the template and website useful but reported that the workload exceeded their expectations. Despite pilot testing of the template before implementation, early revision of the template is recommended. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:403-406).
PubMed ID
27995839 View in PubMed
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[Impending changes in Swedish ambulance services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222208
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(6-7):196-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B. Gårdelöf
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(6-7):196-7
Date
1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Emergency Medical Services - trends
Finland
Humans
Norway
Sweden
Transportation of Patients
Notes
Comment On: Nord Med. 1993;108(3):70-18455973
PubMed ID
8321646 View in PubMed
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Is the emergency department an appropriate substitute for primary care for persons with traumatic spinal cord injury?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119037
Source
Spinal Cord. 2013 Mar;51(3):202-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
S J T Guilcher
B C Craven
A. Calzavara
M A McColl
S B Jaglal
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health, Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sara.guilcher@utoronto.ca
Source
Spinal Cord. 2013 Mar;51(3):202-8
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Emergency Medical Services - trends - utilization
Emergency Service, Hospital - trends - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - trends - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Cord Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Retrospective cohort with linkage of administrative data sets.
To describe the patterns (for example, number of visits by year post-injury) and characteristics of the emergency department (ED) visits (for example, acuity level, timing of visits, reasons for visits) made by persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) over a 6-year period following injury.
Ontario, Canada.
Rates of ED utilization and reasons for ED visits were calculated between the fiscal years 2003-2009. Reasons for visits were categorized by acuity level: potentially preventable visits were defined as visits related to ambulatory sensitive conditions; low acuity and high acuity visits were defined by the Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale.
The total number of ED visits for the 6-year period is 4403 (n=1217). Of these visits, 752 (17%) were classified as potentially preventable, 1443 (33%) as low acuity and 2208 (50%) as high acuity. The majority of patients, regardless of acuity level, did not see a primary care practitioner on the day of the ED visit and most visits occurred during the weekday (Mon-Fri 0700-1659 hours). ED use was highest in the first year but remained high over the subsequent years. For potentially preventable visits, the majority of visits were related to urinary tract infections (n=385 visits, 51.2%), followed by pneumonia (n=91, 12.1%).
Given the high rates of ED use for low acuity and potentially preventable conditions, these results suggest that the ED is being used as an inappropriate substitute for primary care for individuals with TSCI 50% of the time.
PubMed ID
23147131 View in PubMed
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[New information technologies in the management of emergency health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33467
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1998 Nov-Dec;(6):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
V N Denisov
L A Vaseneva
A I Sidorov
R G Grinkevich
T P Pogodina
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1998 Nov-Dec;(6):30-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - organization & administration
Child
Comparative Study
Computer Communication Networks
Emergency Medical Services - trends
English Abstract
Humans
Siberia
Telemedicine
Abstract
Novel information computer system introduced at the first aid station of Novosibirsk has improved effectiveness of ambulance transport and emergency teams; quickened the process of reporting information to the head of the station and higher medical institutions as well as responding to requests; facilitated control over continuous education of the staff and planning of relevant educational programs.
PubMed ID
10050587 View in PubMed
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[On particular factors affecting demand in emergency medical care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171267
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;(5):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
T M Maksimova
V B Belov
A G Rogovina
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;(5):22-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Emergency Medical Services - trends
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Comparative description of two groups of population--seeking and not seeking emergency medical care--is presented. To demonstrate dynamics of appealability for particular types of medical care official statistics data from 1999 to 2003 was used. To explore characteristics of health and self-care behavior in population seeking medical care data of survey carried out during 1999-2000 on various national territories was applied. In respondents seeking out-patient and in-patient care during a year demand in emergency medical care was higher in men than in women. In both genders this demand increases successively with age whereas contingent of persons who evaded extreme deterioration of health during a year reaches its maximum at the age of 30-49. More direct involvement of patient care institutions is needed with such patients as males, older people, indigent and least educated persons who are much less than others inclined and capable to obtain completeness and effectiveness of one's diagnostic and treatment.
PubMed ID
16401027 View in PubMed
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[Psychiatric provisions for patients in departments for treatment of acute poisoning from the standpoint of manpower standards]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68707
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1982;82(2):253-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
M A Rogovoi
V A Piskunov
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1982;82(2):253-7
Date
1982
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Emergency Medical Services - trends
English Abstract
Humans
Mental Disorders - complications
Mental Health Services - manpower
Personnel Management
Poisoning - therapy
Psychiatry
Siberia
Suicide, Attempted
Abstract
The results of a study carried out at basic health service institutions in 7 cities of the country and dealing with the forms, occurrence, character and duration of psychopathological symptoms in patients with acute poisonings are presented. The annual scope and expenses of a psychiatrist's consultative work at a specialized division are determined. It was found desirable to have one staff psychiatrist per each 50 patients treated at the division. The initial prerequisites and method of calculating that rate are described.
PubMed ID
7072432 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.