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[20 years emergency surgery of abdominal organs in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104248
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(5):7-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A S Ermolov
A N Smoliar
I A Shliakhovskii
M G Khramenkov
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(5):7-16
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen, Acute - classification - epidemiology - surgery
Anniversaries and Special Events
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care - methods - organization & administration
Moscow - epidemiology
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality Improvement - statistics & numerical data - trends
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The analysis of emergency surgical care in medical institution of Moscow for the last 20 years is presented in the article. There were 912 156 patients with acute appendicitis, strangulated hernia, perforated gastro-duodenal ulcer, gastro-duodenal bleeding, acute cholecystitis, acute pancreatitis, acute intestinal obstruction on treatment during this period. It was observed reduction overall and postoperative mortality. It was concluded that positive results are caused by development of material and technical base, transition on clock mode of diagnostic units, increase of patients? number hospitalized in department of intensive care for operation training and after it, using of modern diagnostic and therapeutic methods, edit documents regulating of health facilities activity according to medicine development.
PubMed ID
24874218 View in PubMed
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[337 home calls during daytime from the emergency medical center in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30514
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Erling Iveland
Jørund Straand
Author Affiliation
Oslo kommunale legevakt, Storgata 40, 0182 Oslo. ovrefoss.14@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed physicians' home calls in Norway. The aim of this study is to analyse home calls during daytime in Oslo in relation to patients (age, sex, district), diagnoses, request procedures, and clinical outcome. METHODS AND MATERIAL: General practitioners in the City of Oslo emergency medical centre recorded their home calls during three months using a standardised form. RESULTS: Calls to 337 patients (mean age 70, median 77 years; two thirds females; seven to children below two years of age) were recorded. The home calls were requested by relatives (36%), the patients themselves (32%), community care nurses (11%), and nursing homes (7%). The assessments made by the operators of the medical emergency telephone were generally correct. Physicians reported 77% full and 20% partial match between reported and found medical problem. The physicians assessed that 22% of the patients would have been able to go and see a doctor. 39% of all patients were admitted to hospital, 34 % needed ambulance transportation. The admitting GPs received hospital reports only after 27% of admissions. INTERPRETATION: Access to acute home calls by a physician during daytime is a necessary function in an urban public health service.
PubMed ID
14963510 View in PubMed
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Acute headache: a prospective diagnostic work-up of patients admitted to a general hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155164
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Dec;15(12):1293-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
S H Bø
E M Davidsen
P. Gulbrandsen
E. Dietrichs
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. siri.bo@ahus.no
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2008 Dec;15(12):1293-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - methods - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Headache Disorders, Primary - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine with Aura - epidemiology
Neurologic Examination - methods - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Stroke - epidemiology
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To find a specified diagnosis for every patient investigated in the hospital emergency room for acute headache suspicious of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and to describe similarities and differences between the diagnostic groups.
We used a standardized set of questionnaires and supplementary tests, including cerebral computed tomography (CT) and if needed lumbar puncture, in the investigation of the patients. Two neurologists diagnosed the same cases independently.
We found 30 different diagnoses as the cause of acute headache. Sixteen per cent had a SAH, and 57% had a primary headache. Patient characteristics, conditions at headache onset and accompanying symptoms were surprisingly similar in the diagnostic groups. For three SAH patients, it took 30 min to reach maximum pain intensity. In all diagnostic groups, a large proportion of the patients reached maximum pain within 60 s.
To distinguish between benign and malignant causes of acute headache is difficult based on clinical features. The consistent use of CT and lumbar puncture is valuable when investigating sudden onset 'first or worst headache ever'. This can reduce the risk of missing a SAH diagnosis, and make it possible to give more exact diagnoses to patients suffering from both primary and secondary headaches.
PubMed ID
18795944 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction: does pre-hospital treatment increase survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52222
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
J. Koefoed-Nielsen
E F Christensen
H. Melchiorsen
A. Foldspang
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulances
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile emergency care unit (MECU) staffed with an anaesthetist, in terms of increased survival among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). The setting was an urban area with 330 000 inhabitants. This was a quasi-experimental before-and-after-study including consecutive emergency calls during September to November 1996 (Period 1, without the MECU) and September to November 1997 (Period 2, including the MECU). Fifty-four ambulance patients had their MI diagnosis confirmed at hospital during Period 1, and another 54 in Period 2. The 28-day mortality was collected from relevant registers. Twenty-four (44%) of Period 2 patients were transported by the MECU. MECU patients had lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) than other patients, both before and after hospital admission. Nitroglycerine treatment was relatively frequent in MECU patients, and cardioversion, anaesthesia and intubation was applied exclusively in these patients. After arrival at hospital, MECU patients had thrombolysis relatively often (46% versus 23% in other Period 2 patients) but percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) relatively infrequently (21% vs 30%). The total mortality was significantly lower in Period 2 than in Period 1 patients (11% vs 21%,
PubMed ID
12394616 View in PubMed
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[Adherence of patients with stable angina to treatment with trimetazidine MR and frequency of emergency medical care: results of the EFFECT study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118141
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(11):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
M G Glezer
R T Saigitov
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(11):4-11
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina, Stable - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Drug Monitoring - methods
Drug Substitution - statistics & numerical data
Electrocardiography
Emergencies - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Episode of Care
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Therapeutic Equivalency
Treatment Outcome
Trimetazidine - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Vasodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
The adherence of patients with stable angina to antianginal therapy is the key factor of controlling the disease. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship of adherence of patients with stable angina to treatment with trimetazidine modified release (MR) with frequency (risk) of emergency medical care. We consistently included in the study patients with stable angina in primary health care. The results of treatment for 16 weeks were monitored at patients with angina attacks three times per week or more, use of short nitrate and treatment with generic trimetazidine. To strengthen the antianginal therapy generic was replaced with original trimetazidine MR. Adherence is considered relatively high while taking 80-120% of the recommended dose of the drug (70 mg/day). The effectiveness of treatment evaluated by the frequency of emergency hospitalizations and/or ambulance calls because of the pain, discomfort, tightness in the chest or ischemic changes on the electrocardiogram. 870 patients were included in the study, the results of treatment in 185 were assessed. Patients with a relatively high adherence to trimetazidine MR (n=151) were used (median) 99% (98, 104), with low (<80%, n=34) adherence - 67% (49, 76) of the recommended dose of the drug. During the study period, the primary end point is fixed in 7 (21%) patients with low and in 18 (12%) - with relatively high adherence (p=0.182). The number of angina attacks, having necessitated taking short-nitrate, decreased in the groups, respectively, with 5 (3; 10) and 6 (4; 10) to 2 (1; 3) per week (p=0.791). Thus, replacing generic trimetazidine with original trimetazidine MR in patients with a high frequency of angina attacks can achieve significant antianginal effect. Adherence of patients to the reception of the drug by an average 1/3 below the recommended amount does not affect the risk of emergency hospitalizations and/or ambulance calls for 16 weeks.
PubMed ID
23237390 View in PubMed
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Adult victims of sexual assault: acute medical response and police reporting among women consulting a center for victims of sexual assault.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71299
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):750-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Berit Schei
Katrine Sidenius
Lene Lundvall
Gyda Lolk Ottesen
Author Affiliation
Center for Victims of Sexual Assault, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. berit.schei@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):750-5
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crime Victims - psychology - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Outpatient clinics, hospital - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Police - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The medical response to adult sexual assault should comprise: the collection of forensic evidence, the treatment of injuries, and follow-up counselling. In the past, victims of sexual assault reporting directly to the police may not have received this total medical care. The Copenhagen Center for Victims of Sexual Assault at Rigshospitalet, Denmark offers a 24-h service. Medical treatment and psychosocial follow up is offered independent of police reporting. The aim of this study was to assess whether adult sexual assault victims who reported to the police differed from those who did not report to the police. METHODS: Using clinical records, sociodemographics, characteristics of the assault, and type of preventive medical treatment received were obtained for 156 consecutive women consulting the Copenhagen Center (March 1st to December 31st 2000). Comparisons between characteristics of victims who reported to the police or not were determined. RESULTS: Ninety-four (60.2%) of the women reported to the police. Women who sought services within 24 h of the assault, had experienced use of force, were subjected to assault outdoors, and among whom nongenital injuries were observed were more likely to report to the police (p
PubMed ID
12848647 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug events in adult patients leading to emergency department visits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144829
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2010 Apr;44(4):641-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Khokan C Sikdar
Reza Alaghehbandan
Don MacDonald
Brendan Barrett
Kayla D Collins
Jennifer Donnan
Veeresh Gadag
Author Affiliation
Research and Evaluation Department, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Health Information, St. John's, NL, Canada. khokan.sikdar@nlchi.nl.ca
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2010 Apr;44(4):641-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Data Collection
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminology as Topic
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Adverse drug events (ADEs) occurring in the community and treated in emergency departments (EDs) have not been well studied.
To determine the prevalence, severity, and preventability of ADEs in patients presenting at EDs in 2 university-affiliated tertiary care hospitals in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
A retrospective chart review was conducted on a stratified random sample (n = 1458) of adults (> or =18 y) who presented to EDs from January 1 to December 31, 2005. Prior to the chart review, the sample frame was developed by first eliminating visits that were clearly not the result of an ADE. The ED summary of each patient was initially reviewed by 2 trained reviewers in order to identify probable ADEs. All eligible charts were subsequently reviewed by a clinical team, consisting of 2 pharmacists and 2 ED physicians, to identify ADEs and determine their severity and preventability.
Of the 1458 patients presenting to the 2 EDs, 55 were determined to have an ADE or a possible ADE (PADE). After a sample-weight adjustment, the prevalence of ADEs/PADEs was found to be 2.4%. Prevalence increased with age (0.7%, 18-44 y; 1.9%, 45-64 y; 7.8%, > or =65 y) and the mean age for patients with ADEs was higher than for those with no ADEs (69.9 vs 63.8 y; p
PubMed ID
20233911 View in PubMed
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Adverse events during air and ground neonatal transport: 13 years' experience from a neonatal transport team in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275292
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015 Jul;28(10):1231-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Johannes van den Berg
Linn Olsson
Amelie Svensson
Stellan Håkansson
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015 Jul;28(10):1231-7
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Organization and Administration
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Sweden
Transportation of Patients - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study the prevalence of adverse events (AEs) associated with neonatal transport, and to categorize, classify and assess the risk estimation of these events.
Written comments in 1082 transport records during the period 1999-2011 were reviewed. Comments related to events that infringed on patient and staff safety were included as AEs, and categorized and further classified as complaint, imminent risk of incident/negative event, actual incident or actual negative event. AEs were also grouped into emergency or planned transports, and risk estimation was calculated according to a risk assessment tool and defined as low, intermediate, high or extreme risk.
AEs (N = 883) were divided into five categories: logistics (n = 337), organization (n = 177), equipment (n = 165), vehicle (n = 129) and medical/nursing care (n = 75). Eighty-five percent of AEs were classified as incidents or negative events. The majority of AEs were estimated to be of low or intermediate risk in both planned and emergency transports. AEs estimated to be of high or extreme risk were significantly more frequent in emergency transports (OR = 10.1; 95% CI: 5.0-20.9; p
PubMed ID
25102938 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug use as predictors of intentional injuries in two emergency departments in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116288
Source
Am J Addict. 2013 Mar-Apr;22(2):87-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cheryl J Cherpitel
Gina Martin
Scott Macdonald
Jeffrey R Brubacher
Rob Stenstrom
Author Affiliation
Alcohol Research Group, Emeryville, CA 94608, USA. ccherpitel@arg.org
Source
Am J Addict. 2013 Mar-Apr;22(2):87-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Risk factors
Self-Injurious Behavior - complications - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
While a substantial literature exists demonstrating a strong association of alcohol and intentional injury, less is known about the association of intentional injury with recreational drug use, either alone, or in combination with alcohol.
The risk of intentional injury due to alcohol and other drug use prior to injury is analyzed in a sample of emergency department (ED) patients.
Logistic regression was used to examine the predictive value of alcohol and drug use on intentional versus non-intentional injury in a probability sample of ED patients in Vancouver, BC (n = 436).
Those reporting only alcohol use were close to four times more likely (OR = 3.73) to report an intentional injury, and those reporting alcohol combined with other drug(s) almost 18 times more likely (OR = 17.75) than those reporting no substance use. Those reporting both alcohol and drug use reported drinking significantly more alcohol (15.7 drinks) than those reporting alcohol use alone (5 drinks).
These data suggest that alcohol in combination with other drugs may be more strongly associated with intentional injury than alcohol alone.
The strong association of alcohol combined with other drug use on injury may be due to the increased amount of alcohol consumed by those using both substances, and is an area requiring more research with larger samples of intentional injury patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23414491 View in PubMed
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Aminophylline in bradyasystolic cardiac arrest: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169285
Source
Lancet. 2006 May 13;367(9522):1577-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-2006
Author
Riyad B Abu-Laban
Caroline M McIntyre
James M Christenson
Catherina A van Beek
Grant D Innes
Robin K O'Brien
Karen P Wanger
R Douglas McKnight
Kenneth G Gin
Peter J Zed
Jeffrey Watts
Joe Puskaric
Iain A MacPhail
Ross G Berringer
Ruth A Milner
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. abulaban@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Lancet. 2006 May 13;367(9522):1577-84
Date
May-13-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Aminophylline - therapeutic use
Bradycardia - complications
British Columbia
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - etiology - mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Endogenous adenosine might cause or perpetuate bradyasystole. Our aim was to determine whether aminophylline, an adenosine antagonist, increases the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
In a double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 971 patients older than 16 years with asystole or pulseless electrical activity at fewer than 60 beats per minute, and who were unresponsive to initial treatment with epinephrine and atropine, to receive intravenous aminophylline (250 mg, and an additional 250 mg if necessary) (n=486) or placebo (n=485). The patients were enrolled between January, 2001 and September, 2003, from 1886 people who had had cardiac arrests. Standard resuscitation measures were used for at least 10 mins after the study drug was administered. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov registry with the number NCT00312273.
Baseline characteristics and survival predictors were similar in both groups. The median time from the arrival of the advanced life-support paramedic team to study drug administration was 13 min. The proportion of patients who had an ROSC was 24.5% in the aminophylline group and 23.7% in the placebo group (difference 0.8%; 95% CI -4.6% to 6.2%; p=0.778). The proportion of patients with non-sinus tachyarrhythmias after study drug administration was 34.6% in the aminophylline group and 26.2% in the placebo group (p=0.004). Survival to hospital admission and survival to hospital discharge were not significantly different between the groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed no evidence of a significant subgroup or interactive effect from aminophylline.
Although aminophylline increases non-sinus tachyarrhythmias, we noted no evidence that it significantly increases the proportion of patients who achieve ROSC after bradyasystolic cardiac arrest.
Notes
Comment In: CJEM. 2007 Jan;9(1):26-917391597
PubMed ID
16698410 View in PubMed
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157 records – page 1 of 16.