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"A call for a clear assignment" - A focus group study of the ambulance service in Sweden, as experienced by present and former employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292617
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Helena Rosén
Johan Persson
Andreas Rantala
Lina Behm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 00 Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: helena.rosen@med.lu.se.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2018 01; 36:1-6
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Medical Technicians - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The aim was to explore the ambulance service as experienced by present and former employees.
Over the last decade, the number of ambulance assignments has increased annually by about 10%, and as many as 50% of all ambulance assignments are considered non-urgent. This raises questions about which assignments the Ambulance Service (AS) is supposed to deal with.
Data were collected from three focus group interviews with a total of 18 present and former employees of the Swedish AS. An inductive qualitative analysis method developed by Krueger was chosen.
Five themes emerged in the analysis: "Poor guidance for practice", "An unclear assignment", "Being a gate keeper", "From saving lives to self-care" and "Working in no man's land", which together constitute the AS.
Present and former employees of the AS in Sweden describe their mission as unclear and recognize the lack of consensus and a clearly developed mission statement. Furthermore, expectations and training mainly focus on emergency response, which is contrary to the reality of the ambulance clinicians' everyday work.
PubMed ID
28712766 View in PubMed
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[Acute coronary syndrome: regional experience of rendering urgent aid at prehospital stage in Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug--Yugra].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117732
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(11):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
I A Urvantseva
L V Salamatina
I A Andreeva
E V Milovanova
S I Mamedova
O R Ibragimov
A A Seitov
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(11):17-20
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - therapy
Ambulatory Care - methods
Electrocardiography
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Thrombolytic Therapy - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
Aim of the study was assessment of efficacy of rendering urgent aid to patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) at prehospital stage on the territory of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug (KhMAO). The analysis showed that yearly about 5000 inhabitants of KhMAO-Yugra received prehospital medical care (30% because of acute myocardial infarction, 70% because of unstable angina). Over 3 years portion of persons requesting medical aid during first 3 hours after onset of pain attack increased 6.1%. Rate of prehospital fibrinolysis did not exceed 6.5%. Alteplase was used most often (79.7%). Late patient's appeal was among causes of rare application of thrombolytic therapy (41.8%). Most physicians responsible for prehospital care considered it necessary to refer patients with ACS directly to centers of interventional cardiology. The data obtained would promote improvement of quality of medical aid to ACS patients at prehospital stage.
PubMed ID
24654430 View in PubMed
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Acute stroke alert activation, emergency service use, and reperfusion therapy in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282026
Source
Brain Behav. 2017 Apr;7(4):e00654
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marie Eriksson
Eva-Lotta Glader
Bo Norrving
Birgitta Stegmayr
Kjell Asplund
Source
Brain Behav. 2017 Apr;7(4):e00654
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Reperfusion - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Ambulance services and stroke alerts reduce the time from stroke onset to acute stroke diagnosis. We describe the use of stroke alerts and ambulance services in different hospitals and patient groups and their relationship with reperfusion therapy.
This nationwide study included 49,907 patients admitted with acute stroke who were registered in The Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) in 2011-2012.
The proportions of patients admitted as stroke alerts out of all acute stroke admissions varied from 12.2% to 45.7% in university hospitals (n = 9), 0.5% to 38.7% in specialized nonuniversity hospitals (n = 22), and 4.2% to 40.3% in community hospitals (n = 41). Younger age, atrial fibrillation (AF), living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were factors associated with a higher probability of stroke alerts. Living alone, primary school education, non-European origin, previous stroke, diabetes, smoking, and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) were associated with a lower probability of stroke alert. The proportion of patients arriving at the hospital by ambulance varied from 60.3% to 94.5%. Older age, living alone, primary school education, being born in a European country, previous stroke, AF, dependency in ADL, living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were associated with ambulance services. Hospital stroke alert frequencies correlated strongly with reperfusion rates (r = .75).
Acute stroke alerts have a significant potential to improve stroke reperfusion rates. Prehospital stroke management varies conspicuously between hospitals and patient groups, and the elderly and patients living alone have a markedly reduced likelihood of stroke alerts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28413705 View in PubMed
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Adverse events after naloxone treatment of episodes of suspected acute opioid overdose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53341
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2004 Feb;11(1):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Ingebjørg Buajordet
Anne-Cathrine Naess
Dag Jacobsen
Odd Brørs
Author Affiliation
Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology Unit, Clinical Chemistry Department, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingebjorg.buajordet@legemiddelverket.no
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2004 Feb;11(1):19-23
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confusion - chemically induced
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Headache - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naloxone - adverse effects
Narcotic Antagonists - adverse effects
Narcotics - poisoning
Nausea - chemically induced
Norway - epidemiology
Overdose - drug therapy
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seizures - chemically induced
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Tachycardia - chemically induced
Tremor - chemically induced
Vomiting - chemically induced
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: An increasing and serious heroin overdose problem in Oslo has mandated the increasing out-of-hospital use of naloxone administered by paramedics. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies and characteristics of adverse events related to this out-of-hospital administration by paramedics. METHODS: A one-year prospective observational study from February 1998 to January 1999 was performed in patients suspected to be acutely overdosed by an opioid. A total of 1192 episodes treated with naloxone administered by the Emergency Medical Service system in Oslo, were included. The main outcome variable was adverse events observed immediately after the administration of naloxone. RESULTS: The mean age of patients included was 32.6 years, and 77% were men. Adverse events suspected to be related to naloxone treatment were reported in 45% of episodes. The most common adverse events were related to opioid withdrawal (33%) such as gastrointestinal disorders, aggressiveness, tachycardia, shivering, sweating and tremor. Cases of confusion/restlessness (32%) might be related either to opioid withdrawal or to the effect of the heroin in combination with other drugs. Headache and seizures (25%) were probably related to hypoxia. Most events were non-serious. In three episodes (0.3%) the patients were hospitalized because of adverse events. CONCLUSION: Although adverse events were common among patients treated for opioid overdose in an out-of-hospital setting, serious complications were rare. Out-of-hospital naloxone treatment by paramedics seems to save several lives a year without a high risk of serious complications.
PubMed ID
15167188 View in PubMed
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Adverse events associated with lay emergency response programs: the public access defibrillation trial experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168751
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jul;70(1):59-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Mary Ann Peberdy
Lois Van Ottingham
William J Groh
Jerris Hedges
Thomas E Terndrup
Ronald G Pirrallo
N Clay Mann
Ruchir Sehra
Author Affiliation
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 908204, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. mpeberdy@aol.com
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jul;70(1):59-65
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - adverse effects - education - psychology
Community Health Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Defibrillators - adverse effects
Electric Countershock - adverse effects
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
United States
Volunteers - education - psychology
Abstract
The adverse event (AE) profile of lay volunteer CPR and public access defibrillation (PAD) programs is unknown. We undertook to investigate the frequency, severity, and type of AE's occurring in widespread PAD implementation.
A randomized-controlled clinical trial.
One thousand two hundred and sixty public and residential facilities in the US and Canada.
On-site, volunteer, lay personnel trained in CPR only compared to CPR plus automated external defibrillators (AEDs).
Persons experiencing possible cardiac arrest receiving lay volunteer first response with CPR+AED compared with CPR alone.
An AE is defined as an event of significance that caused, or had the potential to cause, harm to a patient or volunteer, or a criminal act. AE data were collected prospectively.
Twenty thousand three hundred and ninety six lay volunteers were trained in either CPR or CPR+AED. One thousand seven hundred and sixteen AEDs were placed in units randomized to the AED arm. There were 26,389 exposure months. Only 36 AE's were reported. There were two patient-related AEs: both patients experienced rib fractures. There were seven volunteer-related AE's: one had a muscle pull, four experienced significant emotional distress and two reported pressure by their employee to participate. There were 27 AED-related AEs: 17 episodes of theft involving 20 devices, three involved AEDs that were placed in locations inaccessible to the volunteer, four AEDs had mechanical problems not affecting patient safety, and three devices were improperly maintained by the facility. There were no inappropriate shocks and no failures to shock when indicated (95% upper bound for probability of inappropriate shock or failure to shock = 0.0012).
AED use following widespread training of lay-persons in CPR and AED is generally safe for the volunteer and the patient. Lay volunteers may report significant, usually transient, emotional stress following response to a potential cardiac arrest. Within the context of this prospective, randomized multi-center study, AEDs have an exceptionally high safety profile when used by trained lay responders.
PubMed ID
16784998 View in PubMed
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Airway management in unconscious non-trauma patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130079
Source
Emerg Med J. 2012 Nov;29(11):887-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Klaus Nielsen
Christian Muff Hansen
Lars Simon Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Sønderborg Hospital Sydvang 1, 6400 Sønderborg, Denmark. talpadanica@gmail.com
Source
Emerg Med J. 2012 Nov;29(11):887-9
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Management - methods
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal - statistics & numerical data
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Unconsciousness - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
Tracheal intubation is recommended in unconscious trauma patients to protect the airway from pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents and also to ensure ventilation and oxygenation. Unconsciousness is often defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score below 9. In non-trauma patients, however, there are no such firm recommendations regarding airway management and the GCS score may be less useful. The aim of this study was to describe the authors' experience with airway management in unconscious non-trauma patients in the prehospital setting with a physician-manned Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU). The main focus of the study was on the need for subsequent tracheal intubation during hospitalisation after initial treatment.
The study was based on an analysis of data prospectively collected from the MECU database in Copenhagen, Denmark. All unconscious (GCS scores below 9) non-trauma patients registered in the database during 2006 were included. The ambulance patient charts and medical records were scrutinised to assess outcome and the need for tracheal intubation during the first 24 h after admittance into hospital.
A total of 557 unconscious non-trauma patients were examined and 129 patients (23%) were tracheally intubated by the MECU physician before or during transport to the hospital. Intubation was done in most patients with cardiac arrest, severe stroke or respiratory failure. Of the remaining 428 patients, 364 (85%) regained consciousness before being transported to the hospital, whereas 64 patients remained unconscious during transport and 12 (19%) of these were intubated in the emergency department.
The majority of unconscious non-trauma patients were not intubated in the prehospital setting. Unconscious non-trauma patients may not all need tracheal intubation before being transferred to hospital.
PubMed ID
22036938 View in PubMed
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Ambulance nurse's experience to relieve pain in patients with addiction problems in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310226
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2019 09; 46:100779
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2019
Author
Katarina Bohm
Roger Lund
Jörgen Nordlander
Veronica Vicente
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset in Stockholm, Sweden; The Emergency Department, Södersjukhuset in Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2019 09; 46:100779
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances
Emergency Medical Services - methods - standards - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pain Management - methods - psychology - standards
Qualitative Research
Substance-Related Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Pain is a personal and subjective experience. Prehospital emergency nurses (PEN) should work on the basis that all people are equal and entitled to the same care regardless of gender, age, disability or social status. The objective of treatment in health care is that all the pain to be alleviated. People with addiction problems often seek emergency care and pain is a frequent symptom. Research shows that medical staff often under treats pain and treat patients with addiction differently.
To describe PENSs' experiences of relieving pain in patients with addiction problems, otherwise called Substance Abuse Syndrome.
The study is designed with a qualitative approach with semistructured interviews. Eight PENs were interviewed and the material was analyzed according to a manifest content analysis.
The study's main finding is that the PENs wanted to give all patients equal care but often experienced uncertainty in the care of addicts. Many of the perceived emotions created a doubt in what situations would be resolved. Lack of information and knowledge about addiction and their own feelings and values of addicts made it difficult to decide what was right or wrong treatment. The difficulty was further increased when the unclear guidelines and lack of support meant that the treatment still perceived to be different.
Pain management of patients with drug addiction can be characterized as a complex task that requires a high level of skill. PENs often encounter this population in their work. Several factors lead to their experiencing these care situations as difficult to manage. Treatment guidelines are perceived as unclear and giving weak support as to how patients with addiction and pain should be treated. To handle this, PEN sought support in their decision-making from colleagues in ambulance care and the Emergency Department. Their conclusion was that treatment would be different every time, and that patients with addiction and pain were all treated differently. Despite advances in treatment options, patients will continue to be under-treated. Unfortunately, it is not just better knowledge of pain physiology and pharmacology that is the solution. Knowledge about and attitudes to pain and addiction must be corrected before any behaviour can be changed. The results of this study will hopefully make knowledge more nuanced and raise awareness of shortcomings in order to optimize care and treatment in the prehospital environment.
PubMed ID
31345691 View in PubMed
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Anaesthesia care with and without tracheal intubation during emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265000
Source
Br J Anaesth. 2015 Jun;114(6):901-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
N. Lohse
L H Lundstrøm
T R Vestergaard
M. Risom
S J Rosenstock
N B Foss
M H Møller
Source
Br J Anaesth. 2015 Jun;114(6):901-8
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anesthesia
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Endoscopy, Digestive System - methods - mortality
Endpoint Determination
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage - mortality - therapy
Population
Postoperative Care
Prospective Studies
Registries
Abstract
Emergency upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common condition with high mortality. Most patients undergo oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD), but no universally agreed approach exists to the type of airway management required during the procedure. We aimed to compare anaesthesia care with tracheal intubation (TI group) and without airway instrumentation (monitored anaesthesia care, MAC group) during emergency OGD.
This was a prospective, nationwide, population-based cohort study during 2006-13. Emergency OGDs performed under anaesthesia care were included. End points were 90 day mortality (primary) and length of stay in hospital (secondary). Associations between exposure and outcomes were assessed in logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for the following potential confounders: shock at admission, level of anaesthetic expertise present, ASA score, Charlson comorbidity index score, BMI, age, sex, alcohol use, referral origin (home or in-hospital), Forrest classification, ulcer localization, and postoperative care.
The study group comprised 3580 patients under anaesthesia care: 2101 (59%) for the TI group and 1479 (41%) for the MAC group. During the first 90 days after OGD, 18.9% in the TI group and 18.4% in the MAC group died, crude odds ratio=1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.87-1.23, P=0.701], adjusted odds ratio=0.95 (95% CI=0.79-1.15, P=0.590). Patients in the TI group stayed slightly longer in hospital [mean 8.16 (95% CI=7.63-8.60) vs 7.63 days (95%=CI 6.92-8.33), P=0.108 in adjusted analysis].
In this large population-based cohort study, anaesthesia care with TI was not different from anaesthesia care without airway instrumentation in patients undergoing emergency OGD in terms of 90 day mortality and length of hospital stay.
PubMed ID
25935841 View in PubMed
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Anaesthetist-provided pre-hospital advanced airway management in children: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272941
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2015;23:61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mona Tarpgaard
Troels Martin Hansen
Leif Rognås
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2015;23:61
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Airway Management - methods
Anesthesiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intubation, Intratracheal
Male
Nurse Anesthetists
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care
Respiration, Artificial - adverse effects - methods
Respiratory Insufficiency - diagnosis - therapy
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Pre-hospital advanced airway management has been named one of the top-five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Few studies have been made on paediatric pre-hospital advanced airway management. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate in children, first-pass success rates and complications related to pre-hospital advanced airway management in patients younger than 16 years of age treated by pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region (1.3 million inhabitants).
A prospective descriptive study based on data collected from eight anaesthetist-staffed pre-hospital critical care teams between February 1st 2011 and November 1st 2012. Primary endpoints were 1) pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate in children 2) pre-hospital endotracheal intubation first-pass success rate in children and 3) complications related to prehospital advanced airway management in children.
The pre-hospital critical care anaesthetists attempted endotracheal intubation in 25 children, 13 of which were less than 2 years old. In one patient, a neonate (600 g birth weight), endotracheal intubation failed. The patient was managed by uneventful bag-mask ventilation. All other 24 children had their tracheas successfully intubated by the pre-hospital critical care anaesthetists resulting in a pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate of 96 %. Overall first pass success-rate was 75 %. In the group of patients younger than 2 years old, first pass success-rate was 54 %. The total rate of airway management related complications such as vomiting, aspiration, accidental intubation of the oesophagus or right main stem bronchus, hypoxia (oxygen saturation
Notes
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PubMed ID
26307040 View in PubMed
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246 records – page 1 of 25.