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[Advanced prehospital treatment of heart arrest by the mobile emergency unit in Aarhus. 1-year survival after out-of-hospital heart arrest--with focus on response time, survival, the given treatment and admission]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53771
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 4;164(10):1345-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-2002
Author
Alf Jørgen Møl Christensen
Niels Kim Schønemann
Bent Lob Dahl
Uffe Steen Landsfeldt
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, laegeambulancen Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 4;164(10):1345-8
Date
Mar-4-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advanced Cardiac Life Support - standards - utilization
Aged
Ambulances - manpower - standards - utilization
Denmark - epidemiology
Electric Countershock - utilization
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - methods - standards - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission
Practice Guidelines
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Time Management
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Arhus includes an experienced anaesthesiologist and a specially trained rescuer. It covers a radius of 25 km from the centre of Arhus with 330,000 inhabitants. Rescue workers in Denmark are permitted to give basic life support and defibrillation. The MECU carriers out advanced cardiac life support in accordance with "The 1998 Guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council". MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data collected by the MECU doctor on a standardised chart and survival data received from the Central Hospital Database were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS: In 1998, 4725 emergency calls were received. Twenty-five per cent of the calls were for trauma, 515 patients had cardiac disease, 158 of whom had cardiac arrest. In 86 patients, death was determined on the spot and no treatment was given. Seventy-two patients received advanced cardiac life support. Twenty-five patients were admitted to hospital. Thirteen patients were alive one year later, which gives a survival rate of 52% of the patients admitted to hospital. Of the 25 patients who were resuscitated and admitted to hospital, 21 received defibrillation, 16 were intubated, 19 had adrenaline, 11 lidocaine, and 9 amidarone. Other drugs used were atropine, NaHCO3, sotalol, and CaCl. DISCUSSION: These results illustrate that for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest early treatment with advanced cardiac life support performed by experienced doctors probably had a positive impact on survival, as compared to basic cardiac life support.
PubMed ID
11894426 View in PubMed
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The first single responders in Sweden - Evaluation of a pre-hospital single staffed unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286019
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2017 May;32:15-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Eric Carlström
Lars Fredén
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2017 May;32:15-19
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Competence - standards
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - methods - standards
Emergency Responders - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Single responder (SR) systems have been implemented in several countries. When the very first SR system in Sweden was planned, it was criticised because of concerns about sending single emergency nurses out on alerts. In the present study, the first Swedish SR unit was studied in order to register waiting times and assess the working environment.
Quantitative data were collected from the ambulance dispatch register. Data on the working environment were collected using a questionnaire sent to the SR staff.
The SR system reduced the average patient waiting time from 26 to 13min. It also reduced the number of ambulance transports by 35% following triage of patient(s) priority determined by the SR. The staff perceived the working environment to be adequate.
The SR unit was successful in that it reduced waiting times to prehospital health care. Contrary to expectations, it proved to be an adequate working environment. There is good reason to believe that SR systems will spread throughout the country. In order to enhance in depth the statistical analysis, additional should be collected over a longer time period and from more than one SR unit.
PubMed ID
27282963 View in PubMed
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Paramedic contact to balloon in less than 90 minutes: a successful strategy for st-segment elevation myocardial infarction bypass to primary percutaneous coronary intervention in a canadian emergency medical system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132306
Source
Prehosp Emerg Care. 2011 Oct-Dec;15(4):490-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheldon Cheskes
Linda Turner
Ruth Foggett
Maud Huiskamp
Dean Popov
Sue Thomson
Greg Sage
Randy Watson
Richard Verbeek
Author Affiliation
Sunnybrook-Osler Centre for Prehospital Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. scheskes@socpc.ca
Source
Prehosp Emerg Care. 2011 Oct-Dec;15(4):490-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods - standards
Benchmarking
Clinical Protocols
Electrocardiography
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - methods - standards
Emergency Medical Technicians
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - therapy
Ontario
Time Factors
Abstract
Few systems worldwide have achieved the benchmark time of less than 90 minutes from emergency medical services (EMS) contact to balloon inflation (E2B) for patients sustaining ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We describe a successful EMS systems approach using a combination of paramedic and 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) software interpretation to activate a STEMI bypass protocol.
To determine the proportion of patients who met the benchmark of E2B in less than 90 minutes after institution of a regional paramedic activated STEMI bypass to primary PCI protocol.
We conducted a before-and-after observational cohort study over a 24-month period ending December 31, 2009. Included were all patients diagnosed with STEMI by paramedics trained in ECG acquisition and interpretation and transported by EMS. In the "before" phase of the study, paramedics gave emergency departments (EDs) advance notification of the arrival of STEMI patients and took the patients to the ED of the PCI center. In the "after" phase of the study, paramedics activated a STEMI bypass protocol in which STEMI patients were transported directly to the PCI suite, bypassing the local hospital EDs. Transmission of ECGs did not occur in either phase of the study.
We compared the times for 95 STEMI patients in the before phase with the times for 80 STEMI patients in the after phase. The proportion for whom E2B was less than 90 minutes increased from 28.4% before to 91.3% after (p
PubMed ID
21830918 View in PubMed
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The Prehospital assessment of severe trauma patients` performed by the specialist ambulance nurse in Sweden - a phenomenographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120636
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anna Abelsson
Lillemor Lindwall
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. anna.abelsson@kau.se
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:67
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances - manpower
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Decision Making
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - methods - standards
Emergency Nursing - education - methods - standards
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Qualitative Research
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - classification - diagnosis - nursing
Abstract
A common feature of prehospital emergency care is the short and fragmentary patient encounters with increased demands for efficient and rapid treatment. Crucial decisions are often made and the premise is the specialist ambulance nurse's ability to capture the situation instantaneously. The assessment is therefore a pre-requisite for decisions about appropriate actions. However, the low exposure to severe trauma cases in Sweden leads to vulnerability for the specialist ambulance nurse, which makes the assessment more difficult. Our objective was to describe specialist ambulance nurses' perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma.
This study had a phenomenographic approach and was performed in 2011 as an interview study. 15 specialist ambulance nurses with a minimum of 2.5 years of experience from praxis were included. The analysis of data was performed using phenomenography according to Marton.
The perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma were divided into: To be prepared for emergency situations, Confidence in one's own leadership and Developing professional knowledge.
This study reveals that the specialist ambulance nurse, on the scene of accident, finds the task of assessment of severe trauma patients difficult and complicated. In some cases, even exceeding what they feel competent to accomplish. The specialist ambulance nurses feel that no trauma scenarios are alike and that more practical skills, more training, exercise and feedback are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22985478 View in PubMed
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