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[Health services utilization by the immigrant population in Spain].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150777
Source
Gac Sanit. 2009 Dec;23 Suppl 1:4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Enrique Regidor
Belén Sanz
Cruz Pascual
Lourdes Lostao
Elisabeth Sánchez
José Manuel Díaz Olalla
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Medicina Preventiva, Salud Pública e Historia de la Ciencia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, España.
Source
Gac Sanit. 2009 Dec;23 Suppl 1:4-11
Date
Dec-2009
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dental Health Services - utilization
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health Surveys
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mammography - utilization
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Papanicolaou test
Spain
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare health services utilization between the immigrant and indigenous populations in Spain.
We used information provided by the following four health surveys carried out around 2005: Catalonia 2005; city of Madrid 2005, Canary Islands 2004 and the Autonomous Community of Valencia 2005. The health services studied were general practice, specialist services, emergency services, hospitalization, and two preventive services: pap smear test and mammography.
In general, most health services were less frequently used by the immigrant population than by the Spanish population. The health services showing the least differences between the two populations were general practice and hospitalization, while the greatest differences were found in the use of specialist and preventive services. The most heterogeneous results were found in general practice and hospitalization, since some immigrant groups showed a relatively high frequency of use in some geographical areas and a relatively low frequency in other areas.
The results of the present study reproduce those found in other studies carried out in countries with similar social and economic characteristics to Spain. Like previous results, the present results are difficult to explain. Future research should aim to use other study designs and to test hypotheses not put forward by the scientific community to date.
PubMed ID
19467739 View in PubMed
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[The Ottawa ankle rules: evaluation in a pediatric emergency setting in Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180429
Source
An Pediatr (Barc). 2004 May;60(5):454-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
C. Cuello-García
A. Ruiz-Flores
L. Ramos-Gómez
Ma E Medina-López
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Pediatría, Hospital San José-Tec de Monterrey, Escuela de Medicina, Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Avda. Morones Prieto, 3000 Pte. Col. Doctores, 64710 Monterrey, México. carlos.cuello@itesm.mx
Source
An Pediatr (Barc). 2004 May;60(5):454-8
Date
May-2004
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ankle Injuries - diagnosis
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Fractures, Bone - radiography
Humans
Mexico
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Radiography - standards
Abstract
Pediatric ankle injuries are a common complaint in the emergency setting. The objective of this study was to prospectively validate the Ottawa ankle rules (OAR) in children in Mexico. This could reduce costs and waiting times in the emergency room.
The authors applied the OAR to all patients aged 0 to 18 years old with an acute ankle injury. The main outcome measure was radiograph and/or clinical outcome determined through telephone contact. The presence of fracture was considered an adverse outcome.
One hundred and eleven patients, aged 3-18 years, were enrolled. The prevalence of fractures was 15 %. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of the OAR were 100 %. Use of the OAR would have reduced the radiography rate by 5.4 %.
The sensitivity and applicability of the OAR in children in Latin-America are confirmed, although reduction in the use of radiography is lower than in other countries.
PubMed ID
15105001 View in PubMed
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