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105 records – page 1 of 11.

Access to cardiac resources in Canada: who is responsible? Who is liable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202874
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Feb;15(2):153-5, 158
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
H E Scully
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1999 Feb;15(2):153-5, 158
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiology Service, Hospital
Cardiovascular Diseases - therapy
Emergencies
Ethics, Medical
Hospital Departments
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Liability, Legal
Malpractice
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 1999 Oct;15(10):1085-810523473
PubMed ID
10079772 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A crisis intervention service in an outpatient psychiatric clinic of a general hospital: function and clientele].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221532
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Mar;38(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
J P Fournier
F. Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Centre hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Ste-Foy, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Mar;38(2):96-100
Date
Mar-1993
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crisis Intervention
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Hospitals, General - utilization
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - utilization
Patient Care Team - utilization
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors describe an external crisis intervention service in a general hospital. This service is intended for a clientele presenting acute mental health problems, referred, in the majority of cases, from the emergency department. They present demographic data, diagnostic data, data on the factors precipitating the crises and data which can be used to qualify and quantify the clientele. In addition, they describe the therapeutic approach and the treatment philosophy, the number of follow-up sessions, and the guidance provided to the clientele after follow-up. Finally, the authors suggest prerequisites considered essential to the effective operation of a crisis intervention module in an external psychiatric clinic.
PubMed ID
8467450 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active hospital-based surveillance for meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine adverse events after an emergency mass immunization program, Edmonton, Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174388
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2005 Jun 1;31(11):126-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2005

Adverse health events associated with the 1998 ice storm: report of hospital surveillance of the eastern Ontario Health Unit region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200667
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1999 Sep 1;25(17):145-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1999

[A geographic analysis of regional disparities in temporal accessibility of emergency services to traffic accident victims in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219162
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jan-Feb;85(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
M F Joly
A. Rannou
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jan-Feb;85(1):41-6
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Analysis of Variance
Emergency medical services
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Quebec
Time Factors
Wounds and Injuries
Abstract
This study provides a geographic analysis of variation in temporal accessibility to emergency services by accident victims within regional municipalities in Quebec. The model employed takes account of various post-accident variables (supply and demand; the service organization) which existed in Quebec in 1987. The study population consisted of 8,989 accident victims who required ambulance service between June 1 and August 31, 1987. The study concludes that the time between the accident and the arrival of the victim at the hospital was longer than one hour (the "Golden Hour") in 25% of the regional municipalities in distant regions and in the areas close to Ontario and the United States. Emergency interventions took less than 40 minutes in suburbs to the North and South of Montreal Island. Forty-eight percent of the variance is linked to the presence and the type of emergency services with an ATLS professional available and 20% is linked with the variables of distance and time.
PubMed ID
8180924 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Infirm Can. 1970 Oct;12(10):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1970
Author
N. Blais
Source
Infirm Can. 1970 Oct;12(10):22-4
Date
Oct-1970
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergencies
Humans
Nursing
Quebec
Substance-Related Disorders
Voluntary Health Agencies
PubMed ID
5202026 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anal migration of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt catheter. Apropos of 3 cases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59334
Source
Neurochirurgie. 1995;41(4):315-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
A. Sami
S. Ait Ben Ali
M. Choukry
M. Achouri
A. Naja
A. Ouboukhlik
A. Elkamar
A. Elazhari
M. Boucetta
Author Affiliation
Service de Neurochirurgie, CHU IBN Rochd, Casablanca, Maroc.
Source
Neurochirurgie. 1995;41(4):315-8
Date
1995
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anal Canal
Emergencies
English Abstract
Female
Foreign-Body Migration - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt - adverse effects - instrumentation
Abstract
Three cases of abdominal catheter migration through the anus following ventriculo-peritoneal shunt are described. Two cases involved hydrocephalus secondary to tuberculous meningitis and the third myelomeningocele. Among the reasons for migration, the length of the abdominal catheter, trauma during the operation and infection must be taken into consideration. One patient was suffering from meningitis at the time of admission, while the two others were asymptomatic. Treatment involved removing the peritoneal catheter in 2 cases and the entire shunt system in the patient with meningitis. The shunt was replaced one to two weeks later. The outcome was favourable in all three cases.
PubMed ID
8524443 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A new system for Montreal: emergency care and hospital centres].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252542
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1975 Feb;52(2):7-9, 45-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975

105 records – page 1 of 11.