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Alternative magnetic field exposure metrics: relationship to TWA, appliance use, and demographic characteristics of children in a leukemia survival study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192274
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2001 Dec;22(8):574-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
D E Foliart
R N Iriye
K J Tarr
J M Silva
R. Kavet
K L Ebi
Author Affiliation
Public Health Institute, Berkeley, California, USA. publichealth@msn.com
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2001 Dec;22(8):574-80
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Demography
Electronics - instrumentation
Humans
Infant
Magnetics - adverse effects
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Survival Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The ongoing Childhood Leukemia Survival Study is examining the possible association between magnetic field exposure and survival of children with newly diagnosed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). We report the results of the first year 24 h personal magnetic field monitoring for 356 US and Canadian children by time weighted average TWA and alternative exposure metrics. The mean TWA of 0.12 microT was similar to earlier personal exposure studies involving children. A high correlation was found between 24 h TWA and alternative metrics: 12 h day TWA, 12 night TWA, geometric mean, 95th percentile value, percentage time over 0.2 and 0.3 microT, and an estimate of field stability (Constant Field Metric). Two measures of field intermittency, rate of change metric (RCM) and standardized rate of change metric (RCMS), were not highly correlated with TWA. The strongest predictor of TWA was location of residence, with highest TWAs associated with urban areas. Residence in an apartment, lower paternal educational level, and residential mobility were also associated with higher TWAs. There were no significant differences in the appliance use patterns of children with higher TWA values. Children with the highest field intermittency (high RCM) were more likely to sit within 3 feet of a video game attached to the TV. Our results suggest that 24 h TWA is a representative metric for certain patterns of exposure, but is not highly correlated with two metrics that estimate field intermittency.
PubMed ID
11748675 View in PubMed
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Assessing time to treatment and patient inflow in a Danish emergency department: a cohort study using data from electronic emergency screen boards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263546
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:690
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rasmus F Nielsen
Noel Pérez
Poul Petersen
Karin Biering
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:690
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
After-Hours Care
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Denmark
Electronics - instrumentation
Emergency Service, Hospital - trends
Equipment Design
Humans
Length of Stay
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Time Factors
Time-to-Treatment - trends
Triage - trends
Workflow
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess and describe the patient inflow during a 1-month period in a Danish emergency department and to evaluate if the intended times to treatment (TTT) related to category of triage were met.
Data from electronic emergency screen boards were extracted from the 1st to the 30th of April 2013. 2000 patients were enrolled of which 1011 were eligible for inclusion in the study of TTT. Patient inflow was described according to hours of the day and days of the week. Patients were divided into groups of triage and TTT was assessed in the different groups. Adjusted odds ratios of not being seen on time were calculated between triage groups and time of the day/week.
The pattern of inflow differed between weekdays and weekends. On weekdays it peaked around midday and on weekends it peaked during the late afternoon/evening. The distributions of the different triage categories between days were similar. Monday had the most patient contacts while Saturday showed the least. Category II (orange) patients were the most prone to exceed the intended TTT. The risk of not being seen on time when compared to daytime, was on evenings OR 2.3 [1.1;4.9] and on nights OR 2.0 [1.2;3.9]. On weekends the odds ratio was OR 1.9 [0.8;4.7] compared to weekdays.
The results demonstrated varying patterns of patient inflow between weekdays and weekends. There was a significantly increased risk of being attended late when arriving on evenings and nights. Likewise higher acuity was associated with exceeded TTT.
Notes
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2011 Oct;58(10):A430121975149
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:3721668987
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):623-818930373
Cites: Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Feb;21(1):37-4123797391
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2009 Oct;54(4):492-503.e419423188
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2008 Nov;52(5):504-1118313799
Cites: Physician Exec. 2007 May-Jun;33(3):32-617539560
Cites: BMJ. 2011;342:d298321632665
PubMed ID
25288356 View in PubMed
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Driving, navigation, and vehicular technology: experiences of older drivers and their co-pilots.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160384
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2007 Dec;8(4):403-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Brenda H Vrkljan
Janice Miller Polgar
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, 1400 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. vrkljan@mcmaster.ca
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2007 Dec;8(4):403-10
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Automobile Driving - psychology
Automobiles
Canada
Communication
Electronics - instrumentation
Female
Geographic Information Systems - instrumentation - utilization
Humans
Location Directories and Signs
Male
Man-Machine Systems
Middle Aged
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
The objective of this article is to explore relationship between older drivers and their passengers (co-pilots) and potential implications of in-vehicle navigation technology on their driving safety.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 44 healthy, community-dwelling older adults (aged 60-83) or 22 married couples. Males identified themselves as drivers and females identified themselves as passengers (i.e., co-pilot).
Findings indicate that operating a motor vehicle in older adulthood is a shared activity between drivers and passengers. Older drivers and co-pilots reported their level of interaction depended on their familiarity with their route. Navigating unfamiliar areas, particularly large urban centers, was identified as the most challenging driving situation. Participants identified their level of collaboration would increase with the advent of in-vehicle navigation technology. Safety concerns related to the use of this technology, included distraction of both drivers and passengers. Differences amongst couples in their perceptions of using this technology were linked to their level of experience with using other forms of technology.
Older drivers and passengers identified working closely together when operating a motor vehicle. Further investigation into the effects of in-vehicle navigation technology on the driving safety of older drivers and their co-pilots is warranted.
PubMed ID
17994495 View in PubMed
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Instrumentation for assessment of tremor, skin vibrations, and cardiovascular variables in MIR space missions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212539
Source
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 1996 Mar;43(3):328-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Gallasch
D. Rafolt
M. Moser
J. Hindinger
H. Eder
G. Wiesspeiner
T. Kenner
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, Karl Franzens University of Graz, Austria.
Source
IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 1996 Mar;43(3):328-33
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Electronics - instrumentation
Equipment Design
Humans
Microcomputers
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation
Russia
Skin Physiological Phenomena
Space Flight - instrumentation
Tremor - physiopathology
Abstract
A versatile and simple to use biomedical instrumentation for noninvasive examinations of cosmonauts at the Russian MIR space station was developed. It consists of a comfortable sensor jacket to assess signals from the body surface, a precision hand dynamometer to produce muscular and cardiovascular loads, and a small interactive microprocessor unit that controls the examination and stores measurement data. The sensor jacket includes highly sensitive piezo-resistive accelerometers, pulse sensors, an ECG system, and a skin-mountable mechanical vibrator. The functionality of this instrumentation was evaluated during long-term space flights and also proved very useful in laboratory and clinical studies.
PubMed ID
8682546 View in PubMed
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Preferred sound levels of portable music players and listening habits among adults: a field study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138475
Source
Noise Health. 2011 Jan-Feb;13(50):9-15
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kim R Kähäri
T. Aslund
J. Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Audiology, Institution for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrens' Academy, Göteborg University, Box 452, SE- 40530 Göteborg, Sweden. kim.kahari@neuro.gu.se
Source
Noise Health. 2011 Jan-Feb;13(50):9-15
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Auditory Fatigue - physiology
Consumer Satisfaction
Electronics - instrumentation
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - etiology
Humans
Loudness Perception
Male
Music
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The main purpose of this descriptive field study was to explore music listening habits and preferred listening levels with portable music players (PMPs). We were also interested in seeing whether any exposure differences could be observed between the sexes. Data were collected during 12 hours at Stockholm Central Station, where people passing by were invited to measure their preferred PMP listening level by using a KEMAR manikin. People were also asked to answer a questionnaire about their listening habits. In all, 60 persons (41 men and 19 women) took part in the questionnaire study and 61 preferred PMP levels to be measured. Forty-one of these sound level measurements were valid to be reported after consideration was taken to acceptable measuring conditions. The women (31 years) and the men (33 years) started to use PMPs on a regular basis in their early 20s. Ear canal headphones/ear buds were the preferred headphone types. Fifty-seven percent of the whole study population used their PMP on a daily basis. The measured LAeq60 sec levels corrected for free field ranged between 73 and 102 dB, with a mean value of 83 dB. Sound levels for different types of headphones are also presented. The results of this study indicate that there are two groups of listeners: people who listen less frequently and at lower, safer sound levels, and people with excessive listening habits that may indeed damage their hearing sensory organ in time.
PubMed ID
21173482 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of annoyance attributed to electrical equipment and smells in a Swedish population, and relationship with subjective health and daily functioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70684
Source
Public Health. 2005 Jul;119(7):568-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
F. Carlsson
B. Karlson
P. Ørbaek
K. Osterberg
P-O Ostergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund University, Bamgatan 2, Lund, Sweden. frida.carlsson@ymed.lu.se
Source
Public Health. 2005 Jul;119(7):568-77
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electricity - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Electronics - instrumentation
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Equipment and Supplies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Odors
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smell - physiology
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Self-reported annoyance from electrical equipment has been in evidence since the mid-1980s, and the first reports of illness from everyday chemicals arose in the 1960s. However, the extent of the problem has not yet been fully established. AIMS: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of annoyance related to electrical and chemical factors in a Swedish general population, and to assess possible relationships with subjective health and daily functioning. METHODS: In total, 13,604 subjects, representative of the population of Scania, Sweden, answered a survey containing five questions regarding annoyance from five environmental factors: fluorescent tube lighting, visual display units, other electrical equipment, air that smells of chemicals, and other smells. The survey also obtained data on self-reported health (SRH-7), mental well-being [General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12], work situation and daily functioning. RESULTS: Almost one-third of the respondents reported annoyance from at least one environmental factor. Annoyance was more frequent among women, subjects of working age and immigrants. Subjects who reported environmental annoyance scored higher on GHQ-12 and lower on SRH-7, indicating impaired subjective physical and mental well-being. They were also more likely to report deteriorated daily functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Annoyance related to electrical and/or chemical factors was common in a Swedish population. Subjects reporting environmental annoyance rated their overall health significantly poorer than the general population. The association with subjective health and functional capacity increased with severity of annoyance, which suggests that there is some connection between environmental annoyance, well-being and functional capacity.
PubMed ID
15925670 View in PubMed
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[The working conditions of microscope operators and the ways for their sanitary improvement in the manufacture of microelectronic devices]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51336
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1989;(2):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A D Liman
T V Pozolotina
A I Gol'din
E N Budianskaia
S S Bershadskaia
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1989;(2):14-6
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronics - instrumentation
English Abstract
Humans
Lighting
Microclimate
Microscopy - instrumentation
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Medicine
Posture
Temperature
Ukraine
Vision - physiology
Vision Disorders - prevention & control
Abstract
The investigation of microelectronic devices showed that the working conditions of microscope operators in general satisfy the sanitary and hygienic requirements with the exception of lighting of places of work and the conditions of objects' illumination in the field of microscope view, this being the main reason of visual fatigue. The earliest and most distinct fatigue signs involve the changes in color discrimination acuity, adaptation time to darkness, response time to light stimulus. The measures intended for optimization of working conditions of microscope operators are proposed.
PubMed ID
2722005 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Working conditions in the production of electron-tube glass].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231866
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1989;(7):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
L S Dubeikovskaia
T N Masliaeva
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1989;(7):26-8
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Dust - analysis
Electronics - instrumentation
Glass
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Medicine - standards
Russia
Abstract
The data on evaluation of working conditions in electron-tube glass production are presented. Major unfavourable factors, such as components of glass dust and their mixture, have been described. Approaches to standardization of electron-tube glass dust are set forth.
PubMed ID
2529191 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.