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2007 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Educational Needs Assessment Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160713
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug;21(8):519-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007

Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107016
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Jim McCambridge
Marcus Bendtsen
Nadine Karlsson
Ian R White
Per Nilsen
Preben Bendtsen
Author Affiliation
Jim McCambridge, PhD, Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Marcus Bendtsen, MSc, Department of Medicine and Health, and Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Nadine Karlsson, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Ian R. White, PhD, MRC, Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, UK; Per Nilsen, PhD, Preben Bendtsen, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):334-40
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Binge Drinking - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Internet
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Brief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students.
To evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process.
A three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (group 1); alcohol assessment only without feedback (group 2); and no contact, and thus neither assessment nor feedback (group 3). Outcomes were evaluated after 3 months via an invitation to participate in a brief cross-sectional lifestyle survey. The study was undertaken in two universities randomising the email addresses of all 14 910 students (the AMADEUS-1 study, trial registration: ISRCTN28328154).
Overall, 52% (n = 7809) of students completed follow-up, with small differences in attrition between the three groups. For each of the two primary outcomes, there was one statistically significant difference between groups, with group 1 having 3.7% fewer risky drinkers at follow-up than group 3 (P = 0.006) and group 2 scoring 0.16 points lower than group 3 on the three alcohol consumption questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) (P = 0.039).
This study provides some evidence of population-level benefit attained through intervening with individual students.
PubMed ID
24072758 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol assessment & feedback by e-mail for university student hazardous and harmful drinkers: study protocol for the AMADEUS-2 randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105186
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:949
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jim McCambridge
Marcus Bendtsen
Nadine Karlsson
Ian R White
Preben Bendtsen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:949
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Research Design
Risk-Taking
Student Health Services - methods
Students - psychology
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Treatment Outcome
Universities
Abstract
Alcohol is responsible for a large and growing proportion of the global burden of disease, as well as being the cause of social problems. Brief interventions are one component of comprehensive policy measures necessary to reduce these harms. Brief interventions increasingly take advantage of the Internet to reach large numbers of high risk groups such as students. The research literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly. Although many studies show benefits in the form of reduced consumption, other intervention studies show no effects, for reasons that are unclear. Sweden became the first country in the world to implement a national system in which all university students are offered a brief online intervention via an e-mail.
This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this national system comprising a brief online intervention among university students who are hazardous and harmful drinkers. This study employs a conventional RCT design in which screening to determine eligibility precedes random allocation to immediate or delayed access to online intervention. The online intervention evaluated comprises three main components; assessment, normative feedback and advice on reducing drinking. Screening is confined to a single question in order to minimise assessment reactivity and to prevent contamination. Outcomes will be evaluated after 2 months, with total weekly alcohol consumption being the primary outcome measure. Invitations to participate are provided by e-mail to approximately 55,000 students in 9 Swedish universities.
This RCT evaluates routine service provision in Swedish universities via a delay in offer of intervention to the control group. It evaluates effects in the key population for whom this intervention has been designed. Study findings will inform the further development of the national service provision.
ISRCTN02335307.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456668 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol email assessment and feedback study dismantling effectiveness for university students (AMADEUS-1): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124868
Source
Trials. 2012;13(1):49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jim McCambridge
Preben Bendtsen
Marcus Bendtsen
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, UK. Jim.McCambridge@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
Trials. 2012;13(1):49
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - prevention & control - psychology
Deception
Electronic Mail
Feedback, Psychological
Humans
Patient Selection
Preventive Health Services
Questionnaires
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Student Health Services
Students - psychology
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Alcohol causes huge problems for population health and for society, which require interventions with individuals as well as populations to prevent and reduce harms. Brief interventions can be effective and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk groups such as students. The research literature on the effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly and is confronted by methodological challenges common to other areas of e-health including attrition and assessment reactivity and in the design of control conditions.
The study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity, and other possible effects of the research process. Outcomes will be evaluated after 3 months both among student populations as a whole including for a randomized no contact control group and among those who are risky drinkers randomized to brief assessment and feedback (routine practice) or to brief assessment only. A three-arm parallel groups trial will also allow exploration of the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The trial will be undertaken simultaneously in 2 universities randomizing approximately 15,300 students who will all be blinded to trial participation. All participants will be offered routine practice intervention at the end of the study.
This trial informs the development of routine service delivery in Swedish universities and more broadly contributes a new approach to the study of the effectiveness of online interventions in student populations, with relevance to behaviors other than alcohol consumption. The use of blinding and deception in this study raise ethical issues that warrant further attention.
ISRCTN28328154.
Notes
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Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2000 Nov;61(6):787-9311188483
PubMed ID
22540638 View in PubMed
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Application of novel communication technologies to the study of farm families: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159943
Source
Prev Med. 2008 Apr;46(4):364-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Lesley Day
James Dosman
Louise Hagel
Suzanne Dostaler
Phyllis Snodgrass
Jeremy Thiessen
Robert J Brison
H Jay Biem
Barbara L Marlenga
Niels Koehncke
Trever Crowe
Punam Pahwa
William Pickett
Author Affiliation
Monash University Accident Research Centre, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria, 3800, Australia. lesley.day@muarc.monash.edu.au
Source
Prev Med. 2008 Apr;46(4):364-9
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agriculture
Communication
Communications Media
Electronic Mail
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance - methods
Postal Service
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Telephone
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of three different communication technologies for collection of health outcomes from farm households.
A randomized controlled trial was conducted in central Saskatchewan, Canada in 2006. The 94 farms completing the baseline questionnaire were randomly assigned to follow-up by regular mail (n=30), computer telephony (n=32), or their choice of regular mail, computer telephony, or e-mail follow-up (n=32). The primary endpoints were absolute differences in the proportions of farms using the assigned method to provide follow-up data, 2 months post-recruitment.
Of the total study population, 51 (54.3%) provided follow-up information. Farms in the regular mail arm were more likely to submit follow-up data than farms in the other arms (27/30 regular mail vs. 23/32 choice vs. 2/32 computer telephony). The differences in proportions between the computer telephony and other study arms were highly significant (e.g., absolute difference between regular mail and computer telephony 83.7% [95% CI: 70.1%, 97.3%; p
PubMed ID
18061658 View in PubMed
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Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in four Nordic countries and an indication of under-reporting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116873
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1386-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Tormod B Krüger
Mohammad N Sharikabad
Bente Brokstad Herlofson
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo , Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1386-90
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisphosphonate-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaw - epidemiology
Electronic Mail
Humans
Incidence
Questionnaires
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess reported cases of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BONJ) to Medicines Agencies (MAs) in four Nordic countries and to compare the Norwegian MA data with BONJ cases retrieved through an e-mail survey to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (OMS) in Norway.
BONJ cases reported to the national MAs in each country from January 1st 2003 to September 30th 2010 were collected. An e-mail survey was sent to all active members of the Norwegian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (n = 54) included questions on total BONJ cases seen in practice and route of drug administration during January 1st 2003 to December 31st 2009.
In total, 253 BONJ cases were reported to the MAs; 39 in Denmark, 44 in Finland, 51 in Norway and 119 in Sweden. These figures result in cumulative incidences (multiplied by 100,000) of 0.7, 0.8, 1.1 and 1.3, respectively. Intravenous administration was reported in 169 of the cases. The e-mail survey resulted in 35 responses reporting 214 BONJ cases, 4-times more cases than reported to the MA.
Cumulative incidence of cases reported in this study differs to some degree in the four Nordic countries (Denmark
PubMed ID
23351164 View in PubMed
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Brief survey: determining brain death in Canadian intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169056
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2006 Jun;53(6):609-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Christopher James Doig
Kimberly Young
Jeannie Teitelbaum
Sam D Shemie
Author Affiliation
Department of Critical Care Medicine, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. cdoig@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2006 Jun;53(6):609-12
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Death - diagnosis
Canada
Critical Care
Data Collection
Electronic Mail
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Intensive Care
Organizational Policy
Physicians
Refusal to Treat - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Criteria for brain death were first described in 1968, and Canadian guidelines were published in 1988. However, international inconsistency persists in the process of determining brain death. We sought to determine self-reported practices and processes in the determination of brain death amongst Canadian intensive care unit (ICU) physicians.
An email survey of members of the Canadian Critical Care Society was undertaken. A survey instrument was developed, then face and content validated prior to distribution.
Eighty eight responded (response rate = 49%), including adult and pediatric ICU physicians working in both tertiary referral (academic) and community hospitals. Most respondents admit patients with brain death to their ICUs. However, 9% reported refusing to admit this type of patient for reasons including inappropriate utilization of ICU resources (36%), and lack of either space or staff (32% and 29% of respondents, respectively). Community hospital-based ICU physicians were less likely to report a hospital policy on the determination of brain death (46% vs 78% of physicians in tertiary care hospitals). Nearly all physicians (96%) reported that a revised national standard and checklist for the determination of death would be useful.
Nearly one quarter, and over one half of tertiary care and community hospitals (respectively) in Canada lack an institutional policy on neurological determination of brain death. Canadian ICU physicians are interested in a national standard for the determination of death, and establishment of processes that may improve the clinical determination of death by neurological criteria.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 2006 Jun;53(6):540-316738286
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 2006 Oct;53(10):1061; author reply 1061-216987862
PubMed ID
16738297 View in PubMed
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Cancer patients' expressions of emotional cues and concerns and oncology nurses' responses, in an online patient-nurse communication service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127081
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2012 Jul;88(1):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Gro Hjelmeland Grimsbø
Cornelia M Ruland
Arnstein Finset
Author Affiliation
Center for Shared Decision Making and Collaborative Care, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. gro.hjelmeland-grimsbo@hioa.no
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2012 Jul;88(1):36-43
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Cues
Electronic Mail
Emotions
Empathy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Oncology Nursing
Prostatic Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Videotape Recording
Abstract
To (1) investigate emotional cues and concerns (C&C) of cancer patients expressed in e-mail communication with oncology nurses in an online patient-nurse communication service (OPNC), and (2) explore how nurses responded to patients' C&C.
283 e-messages sent from 38 breast and 22 prostate cancer patients and 286 e-responses from five oncology nurses were coded with the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences.
We identified 102 cues and 33 concerns expressed in patients' messages. Cues indicating expression of uncertainty or hope, occurred most frequently (in 38.5% of messages), followed by concerns (in 24.4% of messages). Nurses responded to 85.2% of patients' C&Cs; more than half of patients' C&Cs were met with a mixture of information giving and empathic responses.
Patients with breast and prostate cancer express many C&C in e-mail communications with oncology nurses, who demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity to patients' emotions in their responses to patients.
Offering e-communication with oncology nurses to cancer patients is a promising and feasible supplement to usual care to address and relieve patients' concerns and emotional distress during illness and recovery.
PubMed ID
22326865 View in PubMed
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Clinical nurse specialists' use of evidence in practice: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163154
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2007;4(2):86-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Joanne Profetto-McGrath
Karen Bulmer Smith
Kylie Hugo
Michael Taylor
Hannan El-Hajj
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Knowledge Utilization Studies Program (KUSP), and Centre for Knowledge Transfer, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. joanne.profetto-mcgrath@ualberta.ca
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2007;4(2):86-96
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Decision Making
Diffusion of Innovation
Electronic Mail
Evidence-Based Medicine - education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Dissemination
Internet
Interprofessional Relations
Job Description
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Research - education - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Pilot Projects
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Technology Transfer
Time Factors
Abstract
The interest in finding ways to bridge the gap between nursing research and implementation of findings into practice has been increasing. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may be a bridge between frontline nurses and current developments in practice. While several researchers have studied the use of evidence by nurses in general, no known studies have been focused specifically on the use of evidence by CNSs.
The purpose of this pilot study was to develop an understanding of the sources, nature, and application of evidence used by CNSs in practice and to investigate the feasibility of conducting a qualitative study focused on the CNS role in relation to evidence use in practice.
This pilot study is a descriptive exploratory design in the qualitative paradigm. Seven CNSs from a large Western Canadian health region were interviewed. Interview transcripts were reviewed for recurrent themes about sources of evidence, evidence use, and barriers and facilitators to evidence use.
CNSs access and use evidence from a variety of sources. All CNSs indicated that research literature was a primary source of evidence and research was used in decision-making. Peers and experience were also important sources of evidence. CNSs used the Internet extensively to consult research databases, online sources of evidence, and to contact peers about current practice. CNSs also gathered evidence from frontline nurses, healthcare team members, and families before decision-making. The choice of evidence often depended upon the type of question they were attempting to answer. Barriers cited by CNSs support previous research and included lack of time, resources, and receptivity at clinical and organizational levels. Facilitators included peers, organizational support, and advanced education.
CNSs in Canada have advanced education and clinical expertise and many are employed in roles that permeate organizational management and clinical nursing care. It is suggested that qualitative research in naturalized settings that investigates the role of CNSs in relation to the dissemination of evidence in nursing practice needs attention.
PubMed ID
17553109 View in PubMed
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Clinical use of sensory gardens and outdoor environments in norwegian nursing homes: a cross-sectional e-mail survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278799
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jan;36(1):35-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Marianne Thorsen Gonzalez
Marit Kirkevold
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2015 Jan;36(1):35-43
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electronic Mail
Female
Gardens
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Gardens and outdoor environments offer multiple therapeutic possibilities for the residents in nursing homes. Web-based questionnaires were sent to 488 nursing home leaders and 121 leaders responded. The clinical impressions of the leaders and staff regarding the benefits of sensory gardens (SGs) to the residents were consistent with previous research. SGs facilitated taking residents outdoors, offered convenient topics for communication and facilitated social privacy for relatives. For improved clinical use of SGs and outdoor environments, systematic assessment of residents' interests, performance and experiences when outdoors, implementation of seasonal clinical programmes and educational programmes for leaders and staff are recommended.
PubMed ID
25517123 View in PubMed
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99 records – page 1 of 10.