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Alert information in the Norwegian Summary Care Record.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259833
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Oct 28;134(20):1927-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2014
Author
Eirik Nikolai Arnesen
Bent Asgeir Larsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Oct 28;134(20):1927-8
Date
Oct-28-2014
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Norway
PubMed ID
25350434 View in PubMed
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Challenges of stimulating a market for social innovation - provision of a national health account.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277535
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:546-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sofie Wass
Vivian Vimarlund
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:546-50
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Marketing of Health Services - organization & administration
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Patient Access to Records
Social Change
Sweden
Abstract
Innovation in healthcare can be associated with social innovation and the mission to contribute to a shared value that benefits not only individuals or organizations but the society as a whole. In this paper, we present the prerequisites of stimulating a market for social innovations by studying the introduction of a national health account. The results show that there is a need to clarify if a national health account should be viewed as a public good or not, to clarify the financial responsibilities of different actors, to establish clear guidelines and to develop regulations concerning price, quality and certification of actors. The ambition to stimulate the market through a national health account is a promising start. However, the challenges have to be confronted in order for public and private actors to collaborate and build a market for social innovations such as a national health account.
PubMed ID
25991207 View in PubMed
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Comparing and improving chronic illness primary care in Sweden and the USA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283052
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2016 Jun 13;29(5):582-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-13-2016
Author
John Øvretveit
Patricia Ramsay
Stephen M Shortell
Mats Brommels
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2016 Jun 13;29(5):582-95
Date
Jun-13-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case Management - organization & administration
Chronic Disease - therapy
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Point-of-Care Systems - organization & administration
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Reminder Systems
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities for improving primary care services for people with chronic illnesses by comparing how Sweden and US services use evidence-based practices (EBPs), including digital health technologies (DHTs). Design/methodology/approach - A national primary healthcare center (PHCC) heads surveys in 2012-2013 carried out in both countries in 2006. Findings - There are large variations between the two countries. The largest, regarding effective DHT use in primary care centers, were that few Swedish primary healthcare compared to US heads reported having reminders or prompts at the point of care (38 percent Sweden vs 84 percent USA), despite Sweden's established electronic medical records (EMR). Swedish heads also reported 30 percent fewer centers receiving laboratory results (67 percent Sweden vs 97 percent USA). Regarding following other EBPs, 70 percent of Swedish center heads reported their physicians had easy access to diabetic patient lists compared to 14 percent in the USA. Most Swedish PHCC heads (96 percent) said they offered same day appointment compared to 36 percent in equivalent US practices. Practical implications - There are opportunities for improvement based on significant differences in effective practices between the countries, which demonstrates to primary care leaders that their peers elsewhere potentially provide better care for people with chronic illnesses. Some improvements are under primary care center control and can be made quickly. There is evidence that people with chronic illnesses in these two countries are suffering unnecessarily owing to primary care staff failing to provide proven EBP, which would better meet patient needs. Public finance has been invested in DHT, which are not being used to their full potential. Originality/value - The study shows the gaps between current and potential proven effective EBPs for services to patients with chronic conditions. Findings suggest possible explanations for differences and practical improvements by comparing the two countries. Many enhancements are low cost and the proportionate reduction in suffering and costs they bring is high.
PubMed ID
27256779 View in PubMed
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Comparison of user groups' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic health records: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134945
Source
BMC Med. 2011;9:46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Carrie Anna McGinn
Sonya Grenier
Julie Duplantie
Nicola Shaw
Claude Sicotte
Luc Mathieu
Yvan Leduc
France Légaré
Marie-Pierre Gagnon
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire du Québec, Québec, QC, Canada.
Source
BMC Med. 2011;9:46
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Canada
Data Collection - methods - standards
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration - utilization
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Plan Implementation - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Electronic health record (EHR) implementation is currently underway in Canada, as in many other countries. These ambitious projects involve many stakeholders with unique perceptions of the implementation process. EHR users have an important role to play as they must integrate the EHR system into their work environments and use it in their everyday activities. Users hold valuable, first-hand knowledge of what can limit or contribute to the success of EHR implementation projects. A comprehensive synthesis of EHR users' perceptions is key to successful future implementation. This systematic literature review was aimed to synthesize current knowledge of the barriers and facilitators influencing shared EHR implementation among its various users.
Covering a period from 1999 to 2009, a literature search was conducted on nine electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on users' perceived barriers and facilitators to shared EHR implementation, in healthcare settings comparable to Canada. Studies in all languages with an empirical study design were included. Quality and relevance of the studies were assessed. Four EHR user groups were targeted: physicians, other health care professionals, managers, and patients/public. Content analysis was performed independently by two authors using a validated extraction grid with pre-established categorization of barriers and facilitators for each group of EHR users.
Of a total of 5,695 potentially relevant publications identified, 117 full text publications were obtained after screening titles and abstracts. After review of the full articles, 60 publications, corresponding to 52 studies, met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent adoption factors common to all user groups were design and technical concerns, ease of use, interoperability, privacy and security, costs, productivity, familiarity and ability with EHR, motivation to use EHR, patient and health professional interaction, and lack of time and workload. Each user group also identified factors specific to their professional and individual priorities.
This systematic review presents innovative research on the barriers and facilitators to EHR implementation. While important similarities between user groups are highlighted, differences between them demonstrate that each user group also has a unique perspective of the implementation process that should be taken into account.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21524315 View in PubMed
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A concept of a MIABIS based register of biosample collections at the Medical University of Innsbruck.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262990
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:293-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Philipp Hofer
Heidi Fiegl
Justina Angerer
Elisabeth Mueller-Holzner
Martina Chamson
Helmut Klocker
Eberhardt Steiner
Helga Hauffe
Johannes Zschocke
Georg Goebel
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:293-7
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Biological Specimen Banks - organization & administration
Clinical Laboratory Information Systems - organization & administration
Database Management Systems
Databases, Factual
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Information Storage and Retrieval
Registries
Specimen Handling - methods
Sweden
Abstract
The knowledge about the quality of samples and associated clinical data in biospecimen collections is a premise of clinical research. An electronic biosample register aims to facilitate the discovery of information about biosample collections in a hospital. Moreover, it might improve scientific collaboration and research quality through a shared access to harmonized sample collection description data. The aim of this paper is to present a concept of a web-based biosample register of the existing biosample collections at the Medical University of Innsbruck. A uniform description model is built based on an analysis of the sample collection data of independent sample management systems from two departments within the hospital. An extended set of attributes of the minimum dataset used by the Swedish sample collection register (MIABIS) has been applied to all biosample collections as a common description model. The results of the analysis and the data model are presented together with a first concept of a sample collection search register.
PubMed ID
25160193 View in PubMed
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The data model for social welfare in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262988
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jarmo Kärki
Erja Ailio
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:343-7
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Finland
Information Storage and Retrieval - methods
Medical Record Linkage - methods
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Social Welfare
Social Work - organization & administration
Abstract
A client data model for social welfare was gradually developed in the National Project of IT in Social Services in Finland. The client data model describes the nationally uniformed data structures and relationships between the data elements needed in production of social services. It contains the structures of social care client records, unique core components and distinct classifications. The modeling method guaranteed the coverage, integrity, flexibility and device independency of the model. The model is maintained and developed by the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) together with the social workers and other experts of social welfare. It forms the basis of the electronic information management of the social services. Implementation of the data model in information systems enables the availability of the client data where and when ever a client has to be helped.
PubMed ID
25160203 View in PubMed
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Developing an acute-physical-examination template for a Tegional EHR system aimed at improving inexperienced physician's documentation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261971
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;192:1129
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lars Lilholt
Camilla Dremstrup Haubro
Jørn Munkhof Møller
Jens Aarøe
Anne Randorff Højen
Kirstine Rosenbeck Gøeg
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;192:1129
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Denmark
Documentation - methods
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Forms and Records Control
Information Storage and Retrieval - methods
Physical Examination - classification
Records as Topic
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
It is well-established that to increase acceptance of electronic clinical documentation tools, such as electronic health record (EHR) systems, it is important to have a strong relationship between those who document the clinical encounters and those who reaps the benefit of digitalized and more structured documentation. [1] Therefore, templates for EHR systems benefit from being closely related to clinical practice with a strong focus on primarily solving clinical problems. Clinical use as a driver for structured documentation has been the focus of the acute-physical-examination template (APET) development in the North Denmark Region. The template was developed through a participatory design where precision and clarity of documentation was prioritized as well as fast registration. The resulting template has approximately 700 easy accessible input possibilities and will be evaluated in clinical practice in the first quarter of 2013.
PubMed ID
23920903 View in PubMed
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Developing and Implementing Patients' Full-Scale Electronic Access to Their Health Record.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282479
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;228:85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Tove Sørensen
Monika A Johansen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;228:85-9
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internet
Norway
Patient Access to Records - psychology
Patient Participation
Pilot Projects
Abstract
To increase patients' empowerment and involvement in their own health, several countries has decided to provide patients with electronic access to their health record. This paper reports on the main findings from sub-studies and pilots prior to the implementation of patients' access to their medical records in large-scale in the Northern Norway Region. The largest pilot included nearly 500 patients. Data for the participatory design process was collected through questionnaires and interviews. The results revealed that the service in general functioned as expected. The patients reported that they would continue to use the service, recommend it to others, and generally had no problems in understanding the content.
PubMed ID
27577347 View in PubMed
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Development Needs of Electronic Nursing Discharge Summaries in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281924
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:819
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Anne Kuusisto
Paula Asikainen
Kaija Saranto
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:819
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Finland
Meaningful Use - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment
Nursing Records
Organizational Objectives
Patient Discharge Summaries
Abstract
In this study the development needs of Electronic Nursing Discharge summaries (ENDS) mentioned by nursing professionals are classified and addressed using the FITT model ("Fit between Individuals, Task and Technology") framework.
PubMed ID
27332358 View in PubMed
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Development of a SNOMED CT based national medication decision support system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261968
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;192:1147
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kell Greibe
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;192:1147
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - organization & administration
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Denmark
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Information Storage and Retrieval - methods
Medical Order Entry Systems - organization & administration
Medication Systems, Hospital - organization & administration
Natural Language Processing
Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Physicians often lack the time to familiarize themselves with the details of particular allergies or other drug restrictions. Clinical Decision Support (CDS), based on a structured terminology as SNOMED CT (SCT), can help physicians get an overview, by automatically alerting allergy, interactions and other important information. The centralized CDS platform based on SCT, controls Allergy, Interactions, Risk Situation Drugs and Max Dose restrictions by the help of databases developed for these specific purposes. The CDS will respond to automatic web service requests from the hospital or GP electronic medication system (EMS) during prescription, and return alerts and information. The CDS also contains a Physicians Preference Database where the physicians individually can set which kind of alerts they want to see. The result is clinically useful information physicians can use as a base for a more effective and safer treatment, without developing alert fatigue.
PubMed ID
23920921 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.