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367 records – page 1 of 37.

Abbreviations in Swedish Clinical Text--use by three professions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262983
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Elin Lövestam
Sumithra Velupillai
Maria Kvist
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;205:720-4
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviations as Topic
Electronic Health Records - classification - statistics & numerical data
Natural Language Processing
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Nutritionists - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
A list of 266 abbreviations from dieticians' notes in patient records was used to extract the same abbreviations from patient records written by three professions: dieticians, nurses and physicians. A context analysis of 40 of the abbreviations showed that ambiguous meanings were common. Abbreviations used by dieticians were found to be used by other professions, but not always with the same meaning. This ambiguity of abbreviations might cause misunderstandings and put patient safety at risk.
PubMed ID
25160281 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in documentation of peripheral venous catheters in paediatric care: an intervention study in electronic patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128012
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 May;21(9-10):1339-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Ulrika Förberg
Eva Johansson
Britt-Marie Ygge
Lars Wallin
Anna Ehrenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. ulrika.forberg@karolinska.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 May;21(9-10):1339-44
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catheters
Child
Documentation
Electronic Health Records
Humans
Pediatrics
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy and completeness in the recording of peripheral venous catheters before and after implementing a template in the electronic patient record in paediatric care.
As a basis for quality improvement and research purposes and to ensure patient safety, accurate clinical data need to be easily accessible in patient records. Several studies have concluded that the relation between performed care and what is documented in patient records is poor.
Before and after study.
The study took place at a large paediatric university hospital in Sweden. Inclusion criteria were patients who were admitted to one of the included wards, had one or several peripheral venous catheters and were available at the ward at the time for data collection. Data were collected by observations and record audits before and then four and 10 months after the introduction of a template for recording peripheral venous catheters in a structured and standardised way.
A significant increase in peripheral venous catheters with complete recording was observed after as compared with before the intervention. The percentage of peripheral venous catheters with recording of any kind was relatively stable (85-93%). The overall recording of peripheral venous catheters insertion did not improve, but there was an increase in the recording of side and size after the intervention. One of the 22 complications observed before the intervention was documented and none of the complications (n = 17 and n = 9) after.
The electronic patient record did not provide accurate data on peripheral venous catheters in paediatric care neither before nor after the intervention.
Further efforts to increase the documentation of catheter-related complications are needed. Integrated decision support systems in electronic patient records that remind nurses to inspect peripheral venous catheters regularly could be one solution.
PubMed ID
22243530 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease. The HUNT study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301152
Source
J Neurol. 2018 Sep; 265(9):2120-2124
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Eldbjørg Hustad
Anne Heidi Skogholt
Kristian Hveem
Jan O Aasly
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Molde Hospital, Møre and Romsdal Hospital Trust, Molde, Norway. Eldbjorh@stud.ntnu.no.
Source
J Neurol. 2018 Sep; 265(9):2120-2124
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Errors
Electronic Health Records
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Norway
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis
Parkinson Disease, Secondary - diagnosis
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Abstract
Diagnostic accuracy is crucial not only for prognostic and therapeutic reasons, but also for epidemiologic studies. We aimed to study the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) for participants in The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), a health survey, containing data from approximately 126,000 individuals and biological material from 80,000 individuals. We included 980 participants from the HUNT study diagnosed with PD or secondary parkinsonism/related parkinsonian disorders. The participants had been diagnosed in conjunction with admission to hospitals in Trøndelag or through out-patient examination. We validated the diagnosis of PD by reviewing available Electronic Health Records (EHRs) using the MDS Clinical Diagnostic Criteria as gold standard. In total 61% (601/980) of the participants had available EHRs and were selected for validation. Out of those, 92% (550/601) had been diagnosed with PD while 8% (51/601) had been diagnosed with secondary parkinsonism/related parkinsonian disorders. The main outcome measure was the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of PD for participants in the HUNT study. We verified PD in 65% (358/550) and excluded PD in 35% (192/550) of the participants. According to our results, the overall quality of the clinical diagnosis of PD for participants in the HUNT study is not optimal. Quality assurance of ICD codes entered into health registers is crucial before biological material obtained from these populations can be used in the search of new biomarkers for PD.
PubMed ID
29992351 View in PubMed
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Acute and long-term psychiatric side effects of mefloquine: a follow-up on Danish adverse event reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264815
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2015 Jan-Feb;13(1):80-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Åsa Ringqvist
Per Bech
Birte Glenthøj
Eskild Petersen
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2015 Jan-Feb;13(1):80-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Antimalarials - adverse effects
Anxiety - chemically induced - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - chemically induced - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - chemically induced - epidemiology
Electronic Health Records
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hallucinations - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mefloquine - adverse effects
Mental Disorders - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Psychoses, Substance-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the profile of acute and long-term psychiatric side effects associated with mefloquine.
Subjects (n = 73) reported to a Danish national register during five consecutive years for mefloquine associated side effects were included. Acute psychiatric side effects were retrospectively assessed using the SCL-90-R and questions based on Present State Examination (PSE). Subjects reporting suspected psychotic states were contacted for a personal PSE interview. Electronic records of psychiatric hospitalizations and diagnoses were cross-checked. Long-term effects were evaluated with SF-36. SCL-90-R and SF-36 data were compared to age- and gender matched controls.
In the SCL-90-R, clinically significant scores for anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression were found in 55%, 51%, and 44% of the mefloquine group. Substantial acute phase psychotic symptoms were found in 15% and were time-limited. Illusions/hallucinations were more frequently observed among women. Cases of hypomania/mania in the acute phase were 5.5%. Significant long-term mental health effects were demonstrated for the SF-36 subscales mental health (MH), role emotional (RE), and vitality (VT) in the mefloquine group compared to matched controls.
The most frequent acute psychiatric problems were anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms. Data indicated that subjects experiencing acute mefloquine adverse side effects may develop long-term mental health problems with a decreased sense of global quality of life with lack of energy, nervousness, and depression.
PubMed ID
25435322 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines on antibiotic treatment for respiratory tract infections in various categories of physicians: a retrospective cross-sectional study of data from electronic patient records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271494
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
David Tell
Sven Engström
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008096
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Electronic Health Records
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To study how prescription patterns concerning respiratory tract infections differ between interns, residents, younger general practitioners (GPs), older GPs and locums.
Retrospective study of structured data from electronic patient records.
Data were obtained from 53 health centres and 3 out-of-hours units in Jönköping County, Sweden, through their common electronic medical record database.
All physicians working in primary care during the 2-year study period (1 November 2010 to 31 October 2012).
Physicians' adherence to current guidelines for respiratory tract infections regarding the use of antibiotics.
We found considerable differences in prescribing patterns between physician categories. The recommended antibiotic, phenoxymethylpenicillin, was more often prescribed by interns, residents and younger GPs, while older GPs and locums to a higher degree prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. The greatest differences were seen when the recommendation in guidelines was to refrain from antibiotics, as for acute bronchitis. Interns and residents most often followed guidelines, while compliance in descending order was: young GPs, older GPs and locums. We also noticed that male doctors were somewhat overall more restrictive with antibiotics than female doctors.
In general, primary care doctors followed national guidelines on choice of antibiotics when treating respiratory tract infections in children but to a lesser degree when treating adults. Refraining from antibiotics seems harder. Adherence to national guidelines could be improved, especially for acute bronchitis and pneumonia. This was especially true for older GPs and locums whose prescription patterns were distant from the prevailing guidelines.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26179648 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer in the elderly: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124994
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 May 20;30(15):1813-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2012
Author
Sinead Cuffe
Christopher M Booth
Yingwei Peng
Gail E Darling
Gavin Li
Weidong Kong
William J Mackillop
Frances A Shepherd
Author Affiliation
Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. sinead.cuffe@uhn.on.ca
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 May 20;30(15):1813-21
Date
May-20-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - mortality - pathology - therapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Chi-Square Distribution
Electronic Health Records
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is predominantly a disease of the elderly. Retrospective analyses of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group JBR.10 trial and the Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation (LACE) meta-analysis suggest that the elderly benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. However, the elderly were under-represented in these studies, raising concerns regarding the reproducibility of the study results in clinical practice.
By using the Ontario Cancer Registry, we identified 6,304 patients with NSCLC who were treated with surgical resection from 2001 to 2006. Registry data were linked to electronic treatment records. Uptake of chemotherapy was compared across age groups: younger than 70, 70 to 74, 75 to 79, and = 80 years. As a proxy of survival benefit from chemotherapy, we compared survival of patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2006 with survival of those diagnosed from 2001 to 2003. Hospitalization rates within 6 to 24 weeks of surgery served as a proxy of severe chemotherapy-related toxicity.
In all, 2,763 (43.8%) of 6,304 surgical patients were elderly (age = 70 years). Uptake of adjuvant chemotherapy in the elderly increased from 3.3% (2001 to 2003) to 16.2% (2004 to 2006). Among evaluable elderly patients, 70% received cisplatin and 28% received carboplatin-based regimens. Requirements for dose adjustments or drug substitutions were similar across age groups. Hospitalization rates within 6 to 24 weeks of surgery were similar across age groups (28.0% for patients age
PubMed ID
22529258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting electronic medical records: are they just electronic paper records?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108722
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jul;59(7):e322-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Morgan Price
Alex Singer
Julie Kim
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. morgan@leadlab.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jul;59(7):e322-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Diffusion of Innovation
Electronic Health Records - utilization
Humans
Manitoba
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Practice Management, Medical - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To understand the key challenges to adoption of advanced features of electronic medical records (EMRs) in office practice, and to better understand these challenges in a Canadian context.
Mixed-methods study.
Manitoba.
Health care providers and staff in 5 primary care offices.
Level of EMR adoption was assessed, and field notes from interviews and discussion groups were qualitatively analyzed for common challenges and themes across all sites.
Fifty-seven interviews and 4 discussion groups were conducted from November 2011 to January 2012. Electronic medical record adoption scores ranged from 2.3 to 3.0 (out of a theoretical maximum of 5). Practices often scored lower than expected on use of decision support, providing patients with access to their own data, and use of practice-reporting tools. Qualitative analysis showed there were ceiling effects to EMR adoption owing to how the EMR was implemented, the supporting eHealth infrastructure, lack of awareness or availability of EMR functionality, and poor EMR data quality.
Many practitioners used their EMRs as "electronic paper records" and were not using advanced features of their EMRs that could further enhance practice. Data-quality issues within the EMRs could affect future attempts at using these features. Education and quality improvement activities to support data quality and EMR optimization are likely needed to support practices in maximizing their use of EMRs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23851560 View in PubMed
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Alert information in the Norwegian Summary Care Record.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259833
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Oct 28;134(20):1927-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2014
Author
Eirik Nikolai Arnesen
Bent Asgeir Larsen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Oct 28;134(20):1927-8
Date
Oct-28-2014
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Norway
PubMed ID
25350434 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the Updated Swedish Regulatory Framework of the Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record in Relation to Usage Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292465
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:798-802
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Isabella Scandurra
Maria Pettersson
Benny Eklund
Leif Lyttkens
Author Affiliation
Informatics, School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:798-802
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Electronic Health Records
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Patient-Centered Care
Sweden
Telemedicine
Abstract
In Sweden, all citizens can (in 2017) access their health data online from all county councils using one national eHealth service. However, depending on where the patient lives, different information is provided as care providers have assessed differently how to apply the National Regulatory Framework (NRF). The NRF recently was updated and this paper analyses version 2.0 should now serve as the guideline for all county councils. Potential improvements are analyzed in relation to patient experiences of using the service, and the rationale for each change in the NRF is discussed. Two real case quotations are used to illustrate potential implications for the patient when the new version is placed into operation. Results indicate that this NRF allows for opportunities to create a national eHealth service that better supports patient-centered care and improves health information outcome.
PubMed ID
29295208 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Voluntary User Feedback of the Swedish National PAEHR Service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302936
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2019 Aug 21; 264:1126-1130
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-21-2019
Author
Annika Bärkås
Isabella Scandurra
Maria Hägglund
Author Affiliation
Health Informatics Centre, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2019 Aug 21; 264:1126-1130
Date
Aug-21-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Electronic Health Records
Feedback
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Sweden
Telemedicine
Abstract
"Journalen" is a patient accessible electronic health record (PAEHR) and the national eHealth service for Sweden's citizens to gain access to their EHR. The Swedish national eHealth organization Inera, responsible for Journalen, created an inbox to receive voluntary user feedback about Journalen in order to improve the service from the user perspective. Based on voluntary user feedback via email. This study explored patients' experiences of using the national eHealth service and identified pros and cons. A mixed method content analysis was performed. In total, 1084 emails from 2016-2017 have been analyzed. 9 categories were identified, the most frequent ones related to questions about why some information was not accessible (due to regional differencies), feedback (including only positive or negative comments as well as constructive improvement suggestions), and emails about errors that user found in their record. These data can be successfully used to continuously improve an already implemented eHealth service.
PubMed ID
31438100 View in PubMed
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367 records – page 1 of 37.