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[50-60 Hz electromagnetic fields and cancer risk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209111
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1997 Mar;45(1):93-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
P. Guénel
Author Affiliation
INSERM U88, Saint-Maurice.
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1997 Mar;45(1):93-5
Date
Mar-1997
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
PubMed ID
9173465 View in PubMed
Less detail

50-Hz electromagnetic environment and the incidence of childhood tumors in Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26451
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1986;7(2):191-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
L. Tomenius
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1986;7(2):191-207
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Electromagnetics - adverse effects
Environmental pollution
Female
Housing
Humans
Infant
Male
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
The magnetic fields from overhead power lines and other electromagnetic sources were determined at the birth and diagnosis dwellings of all tumor cases reported in the county of Stockholm during the years 1958-73 for individuals 0-18 years of age. The study was limited to 716 cases having a permanent address in the county both at time of birth and diagnosis. An equivalent number of controls was matched to the cases according to church district of birth, age, and sex. Outside each dwelling, the occurrence of visible electrical constructions (6-200-kV high-voltage wires, substations, transformers, electric railroads, and subways) within 150 m of the dwelling was noted. Also, the 50-Hz magnetic field was measured outside the main entrance of the dwelling. Visible 200-kv wires were noted at 45 of 2,098 dwellings and were found twice as frequently among cases as among controls (P less than .05). The magnetic field measured at the dwelling varied between 0.0004 to 1.9 microT (mean value 0.069 microT). The magnetic field was higher (0.22 microT) at dwellings with visible 200-kV wires than at those without such wires. Magnetic fields of 0.3 microT or more were measured at 48 dwellings, and were found twice as frequently among cases as among controls (P less than .05). The difference was most pronounced for dwellings of nervous system tumors and was less for leukemias.
PubMed ID
3741493 View in PubMed
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Accidental exposure to electromagnetic fields from the radar of a naval ship: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256376
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bente E Moen
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Nils Bull
Gunnhild Oftedal
Kjell Hansson Mild
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. bente.moen@isf.uib.no.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adult
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radar
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
Part of a crew on a Norwegian naval ship was exposed to the radar waves for approximately 7 min from an American destroyer during an incident at sea in August 2012. Information about the exposure was not given by the navy. This is a description of what happened with the crew on board after this event. 14 persons had been on the ship bridge or outside on the deck during the exposure and the rest of the crew had been inside the ship. 27 persons were examined at a hospital 6-8 months after the event, as they had developeda large number of symptoms from different organ systems. They were very worried about all types of possible adverse health effects due to the incident. All were examined by an occupational physician and anophthalmologist, by an interview, clinical examinations and blood tests at the hospital. The interview of the personnel revealed that they had not experienced any major heating during the episode. Their symptoms developed days or weeks after the radar exposure. They had no objective signs of adverse health effects at the examination related to the incident. Long-term health effect from the exposure is highly unlikely. The development of different symptoms after the incident was probably due to the fear of possible health consequences. Better routines for such incidents at sea should be developed to avoid this type of anxiety.
PubMed ID
24408137 View in PubMed
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[A hygienic assessment of the work of students on Macintosh computers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201610
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 May-Jun;(3):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Gel'tishcheva
T Zh Khusainov
G N Zhichkina
N V Serik
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 May-Jun;(3):45-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Computer User Training - statistics & numerical data
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Higher Nervous Activity
Humans
Information Science - education
Mental Fatigue - etiology - physiopathology
Microcomputers - statistics & numerical data
Moscow
Refraction, Ocular
Abstract
Various kinds of works of 6-11th-form schoolchildren on Macintosh computers were physiologically and hygienically assessed at the lesson of information science and computer engineering (ISCE), as well as typing. The fatigue of a visual analyzer was due to the time of looking through the data available on the display; the adverse changes of the higher nervous activity depends on the complexity of educational materials and the intensity of work on a computer. Three-hour studies in ISCE should be excluded from the time able of lessons as they do not meet hygienic requirements.
PubMed ID
10394738 View in PubMed
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Alternate indices of electric and magnetic field exposures among Ontario electrical utility workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205865
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1998;19(3):140-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
P J Villeneuve
D A Agnew
P N Corey
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1998;19(3):140-51
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biometry
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Electronics, Medical - instrumentation
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Ontario - epidemiology
Power Plants
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies examining the risk of cancer among occupational groups exposed to electric fields (EF) and or magnetic fields (MF) have relied on traditional summaries of exposure such as the time weighted arithmetic or geometric mean exposure. Findings from animal and cellular studies support the consideration of alternative measures of exposure capable of capturing threshold and intermittent measures of field strength. The main objective of this study was to identify a series of suitable exposure metrics for an ongoing cancer incidence study in a cohort of Ontario electric utility workers. Principal components analysis (PCA) and correlational analysis were used to explore the relationships within and between series of EF and MF exposure indices. Exposure data were collected using personal monitors worn by a sample of 820 workers which yielded 4247 worker days of measurement data. For both EF and MF, the first axis of the PCA identified a series of intercorrelated indices that included the geometric mean, median and arithmetic mean. A considerable portion of the variability in EF and MF exposures were accounted for by two other principal component axes. The second axes for EF and MF exposures were representative of the standard deviation (standard deviation) and thresholds of field measures. To a lesser extent, the variability in the exposure variable was explained by time dependent indices which consisted of autocorrelations at 5 min lags and average transitions in field strength. Our results suggest that the variability in exposure data can only be accounted for by using several exposure indices, and consequently, a series of metrics should be used when exploring the risk of cancer owing to MF and EF exposure in this cohort. Furthermore, the poor correlations observed between indices of MF and EF reinforce the need to be take both fields into account when assessing the risk of cancer in this occupational group.
PubMed ID
9554692 View in PubMed
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[A methodological approach to studying the values of 50-Hz electromagnetic fields that influence the workers of power enterprises].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146279
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):88-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N E Iliukhin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):88-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Power Plants
Prognosis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Workplace - standards
Abstract
The necessity of studying the impact of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the health status of the operation staff from power enterprises has stemmed from the improper prior significance being attached to this matter. The subjects of the investigations were operators' premises, work environment system, and operation staff. The intensity of the electrical and magnetic constituents of a 50-Hz EMF in the operation staff's workplaces, in the areas adjacent to 500- and 110-kVsubstation grounding systems, and in the flats of the approximate apartment houses where the workers lived was measured. Then their permissible cumulative daily exposure was calculated. Working arrangement was also assessed. The examinees' behavior was predicted in stress situations. This permitted a scientific rationale to be provided for protective measures against exposure to electromagnetic irradiations in productive and nonproductive conditions.
PubMed ID
20050069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Annals of conflicting results: looking back on electromagnetic field research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210567
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1443-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1996
Author
D. Schoen
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Nov 15;155(10):1443-6
Date
Nov-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Research Design
Risk
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Few environmental health issues are as contentious as the question of whether exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from power lines increases cancer risk. Among the many actors in this controversy, epidemiologists have played the leading role in raising the question and motivating research. Epidemiologic studies of the effects of exposure to power-line EMFs include the investigation by Dr. Gilles Thériault and colleagues into incidence rates of cancer among electric-utility workers in Quebec, Ontario and France. With the development of personal dosimeters to measure exposure to electric, magnetic and pulsed EMFs, occupational studies in the 1990s have made an important methodologic advance. But, as Thériault explains, improvements in assessing exposure have not yet translated into clear and consistent findings.
Notes
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Jul;128(1):21-383164167
Cites: Bioelectromagnetics. 1990;11(2):159-672242051
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Nov 1;134(9):923-371843457
Cites: Experientia. 1986 Feb 15;42(2):185-63948973
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Jul 15;144(2):150-608678046
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jan 15;141(2):123-347817968
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1980 Mar;111(3):292-67361752
Cites: Brain Res Bull. 1993;30(1-2):153-68420625
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Nov 1;140(9):805-207977291
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Mar 15;139(6):550-728172168
Cites: Epidemiology. 1993 Mar;4(2):104-148452898
Cites: J Cell Biochem. 1993 Apr;51(4):381-68496241
Cites: J Cell Biochem. 1993 Apr;51(4):387-938496242
Cites: J Cell Biochem. 1993 Apr;51(4):394-4038098713
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1993 Oct 1;138(7):467-818213751
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1993 Sep;4(5):465-768218879
PubMed ID
8943934 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Are electromagnetic fields created by electric means hazardous to health?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202864
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Feb 10;119(4):490
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1999

Are occupational, hobby, or lifestyle exposures associated with Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukaemia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19516
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Nov;58(11):722-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
J. Björk
M. Albin
H. Welinder
H. Tinnerberg
N. Mauritzson
T. Kauppinen
U. Strömberg
B. Johansson
R. Billström
Z. Mikoczy
T. Ahlgren
P G Nilsson
F. Mitelman
L. Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. jonas.bjork@ymed.lu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Nov;58(11):722-7
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Hobbies
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic - etiology
Leukemia, Myeloid, Philadelphia-Positive - etiology
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Solvents - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate a broad range of occupational, hobby, and lifestyle exposures, suggested as risk factors for Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). METHODS: A case-control study, comprising 255 Ph+CML patients from southern Sweden and matched controls, was conducted. Individual data on work tasks, hobbies, and lifestyle exposures were obtained by telephone interviews. Occupational hygienists assessed occupational and hobby exposures for each subject individually. Also, occupational titles were obtained from national registries, and group level exposure-that is, the exposure proportion for each occupational title-was assessed with a job exposure matrix. The effects of 11 exposures using individual data and two exposures using group data (organic solvents and animal dust) were estimated. RESULTS: For the individual data on organic solvents, an effect was found for moderate or high intensity of exposure (odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1 to 11) and for long duration (15-20 years) of exposure (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.0). By contrast, the group data showed no association (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.27 to 1.8; moderate or high intensity versus no exposure). For extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs), only individual data were available. An association with long occupational exposure to EMFs was found (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.5). However, no effect of EMF intensity was indicated. No significant effects of benzene, gasoline or diesel, or tobacco smoking were found. OR estimates below unity were suggested for personal use of hair dye and for agricultural exposures. CONCLUSIONS: Associations between exposure to organic solvents and EMFs, and Ph+CML were indicated but were not entirely consistent.
PubMed ID
11600728 View in PubMed
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223 records – page 1 of 23.