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319 records – page 1 of 32.

[50-60 Hz electromagnetic fields and cancer risk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209111
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1997 Mar;45(1):93-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
P. Guénel
Author Affiliation
INSERM U88, Saint-Maurice.
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1997 Mar;45(1):93-5
Date
Mar-1997
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
PubMed ID
9173465 View in PubMed
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50-Hz electromagnetic environment and the incidence of childhood tumors in Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26451
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1986;7(2):191-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
L. Tomenius
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1986;7(2):191-207
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Electromagnetics - adverse effects
Environmental pollution
Female
Housing
Humans
Infant
Male
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
The magnetic fields from overhead power lines and other electromagnetic sources were determined at the birth and diagnosis dwellings of all tumor cases reported in the county of Stockholm during the years 1958-73 for individuals 0-18 years of age. The study was limited to 716 cases having a permanent address in the county both at time of birth and diagnosis. An equivalent number of controls was matched to the cases according to church district of birth, age, and sex. Outside each dwelling, the occurrence of visible electrical constructions (6-200-kV high-voltage wires, substations, transformers, electric railroads, and subways) within 150 m of the dwelling was noted. Also, the 50-Hz magnetic field was measured outside the main entrance of the dwelling. Visible 200-kv wires were noted at 45 of 2,098 dwellings and were found twice as frequently among cases as among controls (P less than .05). The magnetic field measured at the dwelling varied between 0.0004 to 1.9 microT (mean value 0.069 microT). The magnetic field was higher (0.22 microT) at dwellings with visible 200-kV wires than at those without such wires. Magnetic fields of 0.3 microT or more were measured at 48 dwellings, and were found twice as frequently among cases as among controls (P less than .05). The difference was most pronounced for dwellings of nervous system tumors and was less for leukemias.
PubMed ID
3741493 View in PubMed
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Absence of relation between sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders and exposure to magnetic fields in an aluminum plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213432
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1996;17(1):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B E Moen
P A Drabløs
S. Pedersen
M. Sjøen
G. Thommesen
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Medicine, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1996;17(1):37-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aluminum
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields
Humans
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Norway
Occupational Diseases
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Radiation Injuries
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This is a study of the relationship between occupational exposure to magnetic fields in pot rooms and occurrence of sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The average exposure to static magnetic fields was 8 mT in the pot rooms. Ripple fields were recorded as well. A cohort of 342 exposed workers and 222 unexposed workers from the same electrolysis plant was retrospectively followed for 5 years. The reference group had a type of work similar to the exposed group except for the exposure to magnetic fields. The occurrence of sick leave and the diagnoses causing the sick leave were obtained from the Occupational Health Care Unit: these data were stored in their computer files. The data were complete. No relationship between the occurrence of sick leave caused by musculoskeletal disorders and exposure to magnetic fields was found. This was the case for both the annual number of periods of sick leave and the total number of days with sick leave. The results must be interpreted with caution due to limitations in the design and available data. Also, static magnetic fields constituted the major exposure, and the results may be different when related to work in other types of magnetic-field exposure.
PubMed ID
8742754 View in PubMed
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Accidental exposure to electromagnetic fields from the radar of a naval ship: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256376
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Bente E Moen
Ole Jacob Møllerløkken
Nils Bull
Gunnhild Oftedal
Kjell Hansson Mild
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway. bente.moen@isf.uib.no.
Source
Int Marit Health. 2013;64(4):177-82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adult
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Norway
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radar
Ships
Young Adult
Abstract
Part of a crew on a Norwegian naval ship was exposed to the radar waves for approximately 7 min from an American destroyer during an incident at sea in August 2012. Information about the exposure was not given by the navy. This is a description of what happened with the crew on board after this event. 14 persons had been on the ship bridge or outside on the deck during the exposure and the rest of the crew had been inside the ship. 27 persons were examined at a hospital 6-8 months after the event, as they had developeda large number of symptoms from different organ systems. They were very worried about all types of possible adverse health effects due to the incident. All were examined by an occupational physician and anophthalmologist, by an interview, clinical examinations and blood tests at the hospital. The interview of the personnel revealed that they had not experienced any major heating during the episode. Their symptoms developed days or weeks after the radar exposure. They had no objective signs of adverse health effects at the examination related to the incident. Long-term health effect from the exposure is highly unlikely. The development of different symptoms after the incident was probably due to the fear of possible health consequences. Better routines for such incidents at sea should be developed to avoid this type of anxiety.
PubMed ID
24408137 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction occurrence: environmental links - Baku 2003-2005 data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162231
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2007 Aug;13(8):BR175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Elyiahu Stoupel
Elchin Babayev
Elchin Babyev
Fazil Mustafa
Evgeny Abramson
Peter Israelevich
Jaquelin Sulkes
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel.
Source
Med Sci Monit. 2007 Aug;13(8):BR175-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Azerbaijan
Cosmic Radiation
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Electromagnetic fields
Finland
Humans
Meteorological Concepts
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Neutrons
Radiation
Russia
Solar Activity
United States
Abstract
Despite substantial progress in modern preventive and clinical cardiology, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains a central acute cardiac event. The aim of this study was to check the basic daily environmental-physical conditions accompanying the occurrence of AMIs in a specific geographic area: Baku, Azerbaijan.
AMIs registered in the Baku area by 21 first-aid stations (n=4919) during 2003-2005 were compared with daily geomagnetic activity (GMA) levels (I(0)-IV(0)) and cosmic ray activity (CRA), described by neutron (imp/min) and solar activity. The same comparison was made for pre-admission fatal AMIs (n=440). The cosmophysical data came from space science centers in the USA, Russia, and Finland.
AMI morbidity followed a daily distribution according to GMA, mostly on quiet (I(0)) GMA days. A monthly comparison showed inverse relationships with solar activity and GMA and correlation with CRA. The daily clinical parameters of AMI correlated with CRA. Despite the daily rise in AMI mortality on days with the highest GMA, the days with the lowest GMA and higher CRA were predominant for AMI occurrence and pre-admission mortality. One of the possible predisposing factors can be life-threatening arrhythmia.
The monthly number of AMIs was inversely related to monthly solar activity and correlated with CRA-neutron activity. Pre-admission AMI mortality was inversely linked with GMA. Daily AMI pre-admission mortality rose with concomitant GMA; low-GMA and higher-neutron-activity AMIs occurred much more frequently and were more strongly related to the number of fatal pre-admission AMIs. The clinical course of AMI was linked with CRA level.
Notes
Erratum In: Med Sci Monit. 2007 Oct;13(10):LE16Babyev, Elchin [corrected to Babayev, Elchin]
PubMed ID
17660721 View in PubMed
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[A hygienic assessment of the work of students on Macintosh computers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201610
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 May-Jun;(3):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Gel'tishcheva
T Zh Khusainov
G N Zhichkina
N V Serik
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 May-Jun;(3):45-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Computer User Training - statistics & numerical data
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Higher Nervous Activity
Humans
Information Science - education
Mental Fatigue - etiology - physiopathology
Microcomputers - statistics & numerical data
Moscow
Refraction, Ocular
Abstract
Various kinds of works of 6-11th-form schoolchildren on Macintosh computers were physiologically and hygienically assessed at the lesson of information science and computer engineering (ISCE), as well as typing. The fatigue of a visual analyzer was due to the time of looking through the data available on the display; the adverse changes of the higher nervous activity depends on the complexity of educational materials and the intensity of work on a computer. Three-hour studies in ISCE should be excluded from the time able of lessons as they do not meet hygienic requirements.
PubMed ID
10394738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Altered states of consciousness: review of experimental data obtained with a multiple techniques approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190226
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2002 Apr;8(2):153-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Pavel V Bundzen
Konstantin G Korotkov
Lars-Erick Unestahl
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Physical Culture, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2002 Apr;8(2):153-65
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, Gas
Consciousness Disorders
Electroencephalography
Electromagnetic fields
Evoked Potentials
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Processes - physiology
Models, Psychological
Research Design - standards
Russia
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the psychophysiologic mechanisms of an altered state of consciousness (ASC) produced via systematic mental training by correlating the results of multiple computerized bioelectrographic measurements.
All subjects were tested, using a set of modern computerized techniques comprising digital electroencephalography, measurement of the low-frequency bilateral activity of the brain, evoked bioelectrographic signals measured by computerized Kirlian photography (otherwise called gas discharge visualization [GDV]), self-reporting by subjects, linguistic testing, and profiling of mood states.
Sweden and Russia from 1996 to 1999.
Young volunteers (61) who underwent systematic mental training for not less than 7 weeks. Members of the control group (56) were not engaged in mental training.
All participants involved in the systematic mental training showed significant positive changes in their psychoemotional status after 7 weeks of mental training. All of the techniques showed specific changes that might be associated with an ASC in the subjects. The Kirlian (GDV) patterns showed a form of "explosive activation," which was stable, reproducible, and correlated with an ASC. This led the authors to introduce the concept of short-term activation of the induced bioelectrographic processes and enabled the properties of this ACS to be determined for the first time. There were practically no changes in the control group.
ASC activation took place with harmonization of the biopotential field of the brain, the psychic state, and the bioenergy fields. This is attributed to changes in both the psychosomatic and psychoenergetic autoregulation. This conclusion is of vital importance for understanding what happens in systematic mental training and understanding the fundamentals of bioenergetic and psychosomatic medicine.
PubMed ID
12006123 View in PubMed
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Alternate indices of electric and magnetic field exposures among Ontario electrical utility workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205865
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1998;19(3):140-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
P J Villeneuve
D A Agnew
P N Corey
A B Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1998;19(3):140-51
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biometry
Cohort Studies
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Electronics, Medical - instrumentation
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Ontario - epidemiology
Power Plants
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies examining the risk of cancer among occupational groups exposed to electric fields (EF) and or magnetic fields (MF) have relied on traditional summaries of exposure such as the time weighted arithmetic or geometric mean exposure. Findings from animal and cellular studies support the consideration of alternative measures of exposure capable of capturing threshold and intermittent measures of field strength. The main objective of this study was to identify a series of suitable exposure metrics for an ongoing cancer incidence study in a cohort of Ontario electric utility workers. Principal components analysis (PCA) and correlational analysis were used to explore the relationships within and between series of EF and MF exposure indices. Exposure data were collected using personal monitors worn by a sample of 820 workers which yielded 4247 worker days of measurement data. For both EF and MF, the first axis of the PCA identified a series of intercorrelated indices that included the geometric mean, median and arithmetic mean. A considerable portion of the variability in EF and MF exposures were accounted for by two other principal component axes. The second axes for EF and MF exposures were representative of the standard deviation (standard deviation) and thresholds of field measures. To a lesser extent, the variability in the exposure variable was explained by time dependent indices which consisted of autocorrelations at 5 min lags and average transitions in field strength. Our results suggest that the variability in exposure data can only be accounted for by using several exposure indices, and consequently, a series of metrics should be used when exploring the risk of cancer owing to MF and EF exposure in this cohort. Furthermore, the poor correlations observed between indices of MF and EF reinforce the need to be take both fields into account when assessing the risk of cancer in this occupational group.
PubMed ID
9554692 View in PubMed
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319 records – page 1 of 32.