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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Bioelectrochemical anaerobic sewage treatment technology for Arctic communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297771
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Boris Tartakovsky
Yehuda Kleiner
Michelle-France Manuel
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada. Boris.Tartakovsky@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Bioreactors - microbiology
Carbon - metabolism
Electrochemical Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrolysis
Equipment Design
Methane - biosynthesis
Sewage - chemistry
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
This study describes a novel wastewater treatment technology suitable for small remote northern communities. The technology is based on an enhanced biodegradation of organic carbon through a combination of anaerobic methanogenic and microbial electrochemical (bioelectrochemical) degradation processes leading to biomethane production. The microbial electrochemical degradation is achieved in a membraneless flow-through bioanode-biocathode setup operating at an applied voltage below the water electrolysis threshold. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests conducted through a broad range of mesophilic and psychrophilic temperatures (5-23 °C) using synthetic wastewater showed a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removal efficiency of 90-97% and an effluent BOD5 concentration as low as 7 mg L-1. An electricity consumption of 0.6 kWh kg-1 of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removed was observed. Low energy consumption coupled with enhanced methane production led to a net positive energy balance in the bioelectrochemical treatment system.
PubMed ID
28105595 View in PubMed
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[Clinical and pathogenetic aspects of the chronic occupational intoxication with fluorine compounds in modern reality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128422
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(11):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
N A Roslaia
E I Likhacheva
I E Oranskii
V A Odinokaia
É G Plotko
E P Zhovtiak
A A Fedorov
E V Riabko
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(11):17-22
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Aluminum
Bone Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Chemical Industry
Early Diagnosis
Electrolysis - adverse effects - methods
Female
Fluoride Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Fluorine Compounds - toxicity
Fluorosis, Dental - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Multi-year follow-up of 358 workers of aluminum pot rooms, including 165 individuals suffering from fluorosis, has shown significant changes in the clinical picture of the chronic occupational fluorine intoxication, developed under modern conditions of production, at lower concentrations of fluorine compounds in the air of working area. In this connection, the pathology of the musculoskeletal system plays the dominating role in this clinical picture and has the large variability of combinations of the individual sections destructions of the bone tissue. The main criterion to establish the phase of the disease is still the number and severity of the signs of this destruction. The visceral pathology in contemporary production circumstances is registered with less frequency and loses a number of the previously described clinical manifestations, however, is still of some importance to identify the early signs of the disease and to prevent the dental fluorosis on time.
PubMed ID
23479954 View in PubMed
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Effects of impulse noise and continuous steady state noise on hearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240880
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1984 Feb;41(1):122-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1984
Author
S. Mäntysalo
J. Vuori
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1984 Feb;41(1):122-32
Date
Feb-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Auditory Threshold
Electrolysis
Finland
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - etiology
Humans
Male
Noise - adverse effects
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Reference Values
Ships
Time Factors
Welding
Abstract
In this study the effects on hearing induced by occupational exposure to impulse noise were compared with those induced by exposure to continuous steady state noise. Three groups exposed to impulse noise, one group exposed to continuous steady state noise, and an unexposed control group were studied. The hearing thresholds of the groups were measured by a puretone audiometer three times in two workdays. None of the groups showed significant differences between the hearing thresholds measured in the morning, at midday, and in the afternoon. Group 1 with the shortest duration of exposure and group 2 with the intermediate duration of exposure to impulse noise had the highest thresholds at 6000 Hz in both ears. Group 3 with the longest duration of exposure to impulse noise had the highest thresholds asymmetrically, at 4000 Hz in the left ear and at 6000 Hz in the right ear. The group exposed to continuous steady state noise also had the highest thresholds asymmetrically, in the left ear at 6000 Hz. It was concluded that the longer the duration of exposure to impulse noise the wider the region of the frequencies that showed raised threshold shifts in both ears. Impulse noise seemed to produce permanent threshold shifts at 4000 and 6000 Hz after a shorter duration of exposure than continuous steady state noise.
Notes
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 1970 Aug;48(2):524-305528412
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1978 Apr;39(4):301-11645558
Cites: Acta Otolaryngol. 1979 Mar-Apr;87(3-4):255-63443006
Cites: Acta Otolaryngol. 1979 Mar-Apr;87(3-4):264-6443007
Cites: Audiology. 1979 May-Jun;18(3):181-96464892
Cites: Audiology. 1979;18(4):320-34475664
Cites: Scand Audiol Suppl. 1980 Aug;(Suppl 12):204-116939090
Cites: Scand Audiol Suppl. 1980 Aug;(Suppl 12):249-566939094
Cites: Scand Audiol Suppl. 1980 Aug;(Suppl 12):339-486939106
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1964 May-Jun;25:237-4514168421
PubMed ID
6691929 View in PubMed
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Electrocoagulation treatment of peat bog drainage water containing humic substances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270004
Source
Water Res. 2015 Aug 1;79:79-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2015
Author
V. Kuokkanen
T. Kuokkanen
J. Rämö
U. Lassi
Source
Water Res. 2015 Aug 1;79:79-87
Date
Aug-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Color
Electrolysis
Finland
Humic Substances
Industrial Waste
Soil
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment of 100 mg/L synthetic wastewater (SWW) containing humic acids was optimized (achieving 90% CODMn and 80% DOC removal efficiencies), after which real peat bog drainage waters (PBDWs) from three northern Finnish peat bogs were also treated. High pollutant removal efficiencies were achieved: Ptot, TS, and color could be removed completely, while Ntot, CODMn, and DOC/TOC removal efficiencies were in the range of 33-41%, 75-90%, and 62-75%, respectively. Al and Fe performed similarly as the anode material. Large scale experiments (1 m(3)) using cold (T = 10-11 °C) PBDWs were also conducted successfully, with optimal treatment times of 60-120 min (applying current densities of 60-75 A/m(2)). Residual values of Al and Fe (complete removal) were lower than their initial values in the EC-treated PBDWs. Electricity consumption and operational costs in optimum conditions were found to be low and similar for all the waters studied: 0.94 kWh/m(3) and 0.15 €/m(3) for SWW and 0.35-0.70 kWh/m(3) and 0.06-0.12 €/m(3) for the PBDWs (large-scale). Thus, e.g. solar cells could be considered as a power source for this EC application. In conclusion, EC treatment of PBDW containing humic substances was shown to be feasible.
PubMed ID
25973580 View in PubMed
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Estimated prevalence of undiagnosed glucose intolerance from hyperandrogenic anovulation among women requesting electrolysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207995
Source
Int J Fertil Womens Med. 1997 Jul-Aug;42(4):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
D A Dumesic
R R Herrmann
A M O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
Source
Int J Fertil Womens Med. 1997 Jul-Aug;42(4):255-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Androgens - blood
Anovulation - complications - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage
Data Collection
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Electrolysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Hirsutism - blood - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Menstruation Disturbances - complications
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - complications
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Hyperandrogenic anovulation is the principal risk factor for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in young women. Since many of these women undergo depilatory therapy, the purpose of this study was to estimate the probability of undiagnosed glucose intolerance associated with hyperandrogenic anovulation among premenopausal women requesting electrolysis.
Case-series study.
Women (N = 791) attending one of 27 electrology clinics in the United States, Canada and Germany received questionnaires requesting anthropometric data; personal information regarding age, surgery and medication use, and family histories of excess hair growth in female relatives and diabetes in parents or siblings.
Of 652 respondents less than age 50 years, 643 (98.6%) women had hirsutism, of whom 465 had regular menstrual cycles. One hundred seventy-eight (27.3%) women less than 50 years of age had hirsutism with irregular menses, and one-half of these women also were obese. Regardless of adiposity, one-third of hirsute women with menstrual irregularity knew the cause of their androgen excess, while the remaining two-thirds were unaware of the reason for their excess hair growth.
Assuming a 20% risk of glucose intolerance in obese hyperandrogenic anovulatory women by the fourth decade of life, the estimated prevalence of undiagnosed glucose intolerance from hyperandrogenic anovulation is 1.7% among women requesting electrolysis before age 50 years.
PubMed ID
9309459 View in PubMed
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[Experince accumulated by RADON Industrial Research Association in treating radioactive waste].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170022
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2006;(2):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
S A Dmitriev
F A Lifanov
A P Kobelev
A E Savkin
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2006;(2):21-5
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electrolysis
Filtration
Humans
Industry
Latvia
Power Plants
Radioactive waste
Radiochemistry
Refuse Disposal - methods
Research
Russia
Ukraine
Abstract
To reduce volume of radioactive waste for long storage, specialists in "RADON" Industrial Research Association according to qualitative contents of the waste use methods of filtration and selective sorption of radionuclides, electrolysis, monoselective purification, burning, plasmic burning and pressing. Overall volume of the waste processed by various plants exceeds 50 thousand cubic meters. The mentioned technologies could be widely used in radiochemical works and other nuclear energy plants.
PubMed ID
16568841 View in PubMed
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[General and occupational morbidity in workers engaged into electrolysis nickel production in Transpolar Kolsky area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142760
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(4):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
E V Tarnovskaia
S A Siurin
V P Chashchin
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(4):11-4
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electrolysis
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Morbidity - trends
Nickel
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia
Workplace
Abstract
Findings are that occupational factors in nickel electrolysis workshops induce respiratory and peripheral nervous system diseases. Electrolysis workers demonstrate the highest prevalence and risk of occupational diseases. The authors make a conclusion on necessity to improve prophylactic methods for occupational disorders in these workers.
PubMed ID
20560491 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.