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Bioelectrochemical anaerobic sewage treatment technology for Arctic communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297771
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Boris Tartakovsky
Yehuda Kleiner
Michelle-France Manuel
Author Affiliation
National Research Council of Canada, 6100 Royalmount Ave, Montreal, QC, H4P 2R2, Canada. Boris.Tartakovsky@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32844-32850
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Biofuels
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Bioreactors - microbiology
Carbon - metabolism
Electrochemical Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrolysis
Equipment Design
Methane - biosynthesis
Sewage - chemistry
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Waste Water - chemistry
Abstract
This study describes a novel wastewater treatment technology suitable for small remote northern communities. The technology is based on an enhanced biodegradation of organic carbon through a combination of anaerobic methanogenic and microbial electrochemical (bioelectrochemical) degradation processes leading to biomethane production. The microbial electrochemical degradation is achieved in a membraneless flow-through bioanode-biocathode setup operating at an applied voltage below the water electrolysis threshold. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests conducted through a broad range of mesophilic and psychrophilic temperatures (5-23 °C) using synthetic wastewater showed a biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) removal efficiency of 90-97% and an effluent BOD5 concentration as low as 7 mg L-1. An electricity consumption of 0.6 kWh kg-1 of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removed was observed. Low energy consumption coupled with enhanced methane production led to a net positive energy balance in the bioelectrochemical treatment system.
PubMed ID
28105595 View in PubMed
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Inactivation of marine heterotrophic bacteria in ballast water by an Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295383
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 01; 140:377-386
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Javier Moreno-Andrés
Noëmi Ambauen
Olav Vadstein
Cynthia Hallé
Asunción Acevedo-Merino
Enrique Nebot
Thomas Meyn
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Technologies, INMAR-Marine Research Institute, University of Cádiz, Campus Universitario Puerto Real, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain. Electronic address: javier.moreno@uca.es.
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 01; 140:377-386
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bacteria
Boron
Chlorine - pharmacology
Diamond
Disinfection - instrumentation - methods
Electrochemical Techniques - instrumentation - methods
Electrodes
Heterotrophic Processes
Kinetics
Norway
Oxidants - chemistry
Oxidation-Reduction
Seawater - microbiology
Ships
Water Microbiology
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Seawater treatment is increasingly required due to industrial activities that use substantial volumes of seawater in their processes. The shipping industry and the associated management of a ship's ballast water are currently considered a global challenge for the seas. Related to that, the suitability of an Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Process (EAOP) with Boron Doped Diamond (BDD) electrodes has been assessed on a laboratory scale for the disinfection of seawater. This technology can produce both reactive oxygen species and chlorine species (especially in seawater) that are responsible for inactivation. The EAOP was applied in a continuous-flow regime with real seawater. Natural marine heterotrophic bacteria (MHB) were used as an indicator of disinfection efficiency. A biphasic inactivation kinetic model was fitted on experimental points, achieving 4-Log reductions at 0.019?Ah?L-1. By assessing regrowth after treatment, results suggest that higher bacterial damages result from the EAOP when it is compared to chlorination. Furthermore, several issues lacking fundamental understanding were investigated such as recolonization capacity or bacterial community dynamics. It was concluded that, despite disinfection processes being effective, there is not only a possibility for regrowth after treatment but also a change on bacterial population diversity produced by the treatment. Finally, energy consumption was estimated and indicated that 0.264?kWh·m-3 are needed for 4.8-Log reductions of MHB; otherwise, with 0.035?kWh·m-3, less disinfection efficiency can be obtained (2.2-Log red). However, with a residual oxidant in the solution, total inactivation can be achieved in three days.
PubMed ID
29753242 View in PubMed
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