Skip header and navigation

Refine By

175 records – page 1 of 18.

A 3-year clinical follow-up of adult patients with 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82145
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2006
Author
Majamaa-Voltti K A M
Winqvist S.
Remes A M
Tolonen U.
Pyhtinen J.
Uimonen S.
Kärppä M.
Sorri M.
Peuhkurinen K.
Majamaa K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kirsi.majamaa-voltti@oulu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Date
May-23-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cognition Disorders - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - genetics
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Electroencephalography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - genetics
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - genetics - ultrasonography
Lactates - blood
MELAS Syndrome - genetics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondria, Muscle - metabolism
Mosaicism
Neuropsychological Tests
Point Mutation
Pyruvates - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To follow the clinical course of patients with the mitochondrial DNA mutation 3243A>G for 3 years. METHODS: Thirty-three adult patients with the 3243A>G mutation entered a 3-year follow-up study. They were clinically evaluated annually, audiometry was performed, and samples were drawn for the analysis of blood chemistry and mutation heteroplasmy in leukocytes. Holter recording was performed three times during the follow-up and echocardiography, neuropsychological assessment, and quantitative EEG and brain imaging conducted at entry and after 3 years. RESULTS: The incidence of new neurologic events was low during the 3-year follow-up. Sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) progressed, left ventricular wall thickness increased, mean alpha frequency in the occipital and parietal regions decreased, and the severity of disease index (modified Rankin score) progressed significantly. The rate of SNHI progression correlated with mutation heteroplasmy in muscle. The increase in left ventricular wall thickness was seen almost exclusively in diabetic patients. Seven patients died during the follow-up, and they were generally more severely affected than those who survived. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in the severity of disease, sensorineural hearing impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, and quantitative EEG were seen in adult patients with 3243A>G during the 3-year follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2007 Jan 9;68(2):163-417210904
PubMed ID
16717204 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125117
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2012 Jul;15(1):37-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Alexandr Bogachev-Prokophiev
Sergey Zheleznev
Alexander Romanov
Evgeny Pokushalov
Alexey Pivkin
Giorgio Corbucci
Alexander Karaskov
Author Affiliation
Department of Heart Valves Surgery, State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation. b-pav@rambler.ru
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2012 Jul;15(1):37-41
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Atrial Flutter - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects - mortality
Chi-Square Distribution
Disease-Free Survival
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - complications - mortality - surgery
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - mortality
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve - surgery
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden 0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring.
Notes
Cites: Heart Rhythm. 2007 Jun;4(6):816-6117556213
Cites: Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2008 Apr;33(4):590-518243722
Cites: Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann. 2008 Aug;16(4):292-718670021
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Oct 7;118(15):e523-66118820172
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 2009 Jul;88(1):101-519559203
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2007 Apr;133(4):1037-4417382650
Cites: Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2010 Apr;3(2):141-720160169
Cites: Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2011 Aug;40(2):405-1121601472
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2000 Jan;35(1):183-710636278
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 2007 Mar;83(3):1225-3017307507
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 2007 Apr;83(4):1319-2417383333
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Sep 15;120(11 Suppl):S177-8419752365
PubMed ID
22514258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abnormalities in beat to beat complexity of heart rate dynamics in patients with a previous myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54616
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996 Oct;28(4):1005-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
T H Mäkikallio
T. Seppänen
M. Niemelä
K E Airaksinen
M. Tulppo
H V Huikuri
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Oulu University, Finland.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996 Oct;28(4):1005-11
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Entropy
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this research was to study possible abnormalities in the beat to beat complexity of heart rate dynamics in patients with a previous myocardial infarction. BACKGROUND: Analysis of approximate entropy of time series data provides information on the complexity of both deterministic and random processes. It has been proposed that regularity or loss of complexity of RR interval dynamics may be related to pathologic states, but this hypothesis has not been well tested in cardiovascular disorders. METHODS: Approximate entropy and conventional time and frequency domain measures of RR interval variability were compared between 40 healthy subjects with no evidence of heart disease and 40 patients with coronary artery disease and a previous Q wave myocardial infarction. The groups were matched with respect to age, and cardiac medication was discontinued in the patients with coronary artery disease before the 24-h electrocardiographic recordings. RESULTS: Approximate entropy was significantly higher in the postinfarction patients (1.21 +/- 0.18 [mean +/- SD]) than in the healthy subjects (1.05 +/- 0.11, p
PubMed ID
8837582 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias in relation to mild hypokalaemia and prognosis in community dwelling middle-aged and elderly subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281049
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Nick Mattsson
Golnaz Sadjadieh
Preman Kumarathurai
Olav Wendelboe Nielsen
Lars Køber
Ahmad Sajadieh
Source
Europace. 2016 Apr;18(4):585-91
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atrial Premature Complexes - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Biomarkers - blood
Denmark
Disease-Free Survival
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Hypokalemia - blood - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Time Factors
Ventricular Premature Complexes - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Abstract
Severe hypokalaemia can aggravate arrhythmia tendency and prognosis, but less is known about risk of mild hypokalaemia, which is a frequent finding. We examined the associations between mild hypokalaemia and ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias and their prognosis.
Subjects from the cohort of the 'Copenhagen Holter Study' (n = 671), with no history of manifest cardiovascular (CV) disease or stroke, were studied. All had laboratory tests and 48-h ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The median follow-up was 6.3 years. p-Potassium was inversely associated with frequency of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) especially in combination with diuretic treatment (r = -0.22, P = 0.015). Hypokalaemia was not associated with supraventricular arrhythmias. Subjects at lowest quintile of p-potassium (mean 3.42, range 2.7-3.6 mmol/L) were defined as hypokalaemic. Cardiovascular mortality was higher in the hypokalaemic group (hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals: 2.62 (1.11-6.18) after relevant adjustments). Hypokalaemia in combination with excessive PVC worsened the prognosis synergistically; event rates: 83 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with both abnormalities, 10 and 15 per 1000 patient-year in those with one abnormality, and 3 per 1000 patient-year in subjects with no abnormality. One variable combining hypokalaemia with excessive supraventricular arrhythmias gave similar results in univariate analysis, but not after multivariate adjustments.
In middle-aged and elderly subjects with no manifest heart disease, mild hypokalaemia is associated with increased rate of ventricular but not supraventricular arrhythmias. Hypokalaemia interacts synergistically with increased ventricular ectopy to increase the risk of adverse events.
PubMed ID
26293625 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ter Arkh. 1995;67(8):23-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
A P Iurenev
R. Devereux
E E Rynskova
P B Dubov
Source
Ter Arkh. 1995;67(8):23-5
Date
1995
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Chordae Tendineae - abnormalities - ultrasonography
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Exercise Test
Humans
Moscow
New York
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
ECG of 322 patients with various cardiovascular diseases allowed the conclusion on the occurrence of anomalous chordae of the heart in 21.7% of cases. The chordae had no effect on the disease diagnosis, running, hemodynamics, left ventricular myocardial mass.
PubMed ID
7482325 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arrhythmias and heart rate variability during and after therapeutic hypothermia for cardiac arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153443
Source
Crit Care Med. 2009 Feb;37(2):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Marjaana Tiainen
Hannu J Parikka
Markku A Mäkijärvi
Olli S Takkunen
Seppo J Sarna
Risto O Roine
Author Affiliation
Departments of Neurology, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Crit Care Med. 2009 Feb;37(2):403-9
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - therapy
Electrocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Finland
Heart Arrest - physiopathology - therapy
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of therapeutic hypothermia (HT) of 33 degrees C after cardiac arrest (CA) on cardiac arrhythmias, heart rate variability (HRV), and their prognostic value.
Prospective, comparative substudy of a randomized controlled trial of mild HT after out-of-hospital CA, the European Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest study.
Intensive care unit of a tertiary referral hospital (Helsinki University Hospital).
Seventy consecutive adult patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation were randomly assigned either to therapeutic HT of 33 degrees C or normothermia.
Patients randomized to HT were cooled with an external cooling device for 24 hours and then allowed to rewarm slowly during 12 hours. In the normothermia group, the core temperature was kept 100 msec of the 24-48-hour recording in the HT group (p = 0.018) predicted good outcome.
The use of therapeutic HT of 33 degrees C for 24 hours after CA was not associated with an increase in clinically significant arrhythmias. Preserved 24 to 48-hour HRV may be a predictor of favorable outcome in patients with CA treated with HT.
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2009 Feb;37(2):735-619325360
PubMed ID
19114905 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arrhythmias in subjects with and without a history of palpitations: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218751
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Mar;15(3):345-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
M L Løchen
T. Snaprud
W. Zhang
K. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Mar;15(3):345-9
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - epidemiology - physiopathology
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The study looked at palpitations in relation to the prevalence of arrhythmia, as assessed by 24-h ambulatory electrocardiography (ECG) in a population sample. The subjects were randomly drawn from among those involved in a cardiovascular survey. Forty-three of those who answered 'Yes' and 54 of those who answered 'No' (84% of those eligible) to the following question, participated: 'Have you observed sudden changes in your heart rate or heart rhythm during the preceding year?' In both groups mean age was 49 years and 58% were men. There was no relationship between recorded arrhythmia and perceived palpitations during monitoring. The prevalence of at least one arrhythmic episode (ventricular or supraventricular arrhythmia or pauses > = 1.5 s) was significantly higher in those who had perceived palpitations during the previous year (98%) than in those who had not (74%) (P
PubMed ID
8013507 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia clinical presentation and diagnostic evaluation: results from the North American Multidisciplinary Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150031
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2009 Jul;6(7):984-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Frank I Marcus
Wojciech Zareba
Hugh Calkins
Jeffrey A Towbin
Cristina Basso
David A Bluemke
N A Mark Estes
Michael H Picard
Danita Sanborn
Gaetano Thiene
Thomas Wichter
David Cannom
David J Wilber
Melvin Scheinman
Henry Duff
James Daubert
Mario Talajic
Andrew Krahn
Michael Sweeney
Hasan Garan
Scott Sakaguchi
Bruce B Lerman
Charles Kerr
Jack Kron
Jonathan S Steinberg
Duane Sherrill
Kathleen Gear
Mary Brown
Patricia Severski
Slava Polonsky
Scott McNitt
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiology, University of Arizona, 1501 N. Campbell Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85724-0001, USA. fmarcus@email.arizona.edu
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2009 Jul;6(7):984-92
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angiography
Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia - diagnosis
Canada
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Prior reports on patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) focused on individuals with advanced forms of the disease. Data on the diagnostic performance of various testing modalities in newly identified individuals suspected of having ARVC/D are limited.
The purpose of the Multidisciplinary Study of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia was to study the clinical characteristics and diagnostic evaluation of a large group of patients newly identified with ARVC/D.
A total of 108 newly diagnosed patients with suspected ARVC/D were prospectively enrolled in the United States and Canada. The patients underwent noninvasive and invasive tests using standardized protocols that initially were interpreted by the enrolling center and adjudicated by blind analysis in six core laboratories. Patients were followed for a mean of 27 +/- 16 months (range 0.2-63 months).
The clinical profile of these newly diagnosed patients differs from the profile of reported patients with more advanced disease. There was considerable difference in the initial and final classification of the presence of ARVC/D after the diagnostic tests were evaluated by the core laboratories. Final clinical diagnosis was 73 affected, 28 borderline, and 7 unaffected. Individual tests agreed with the final diagnosis in 50% to 70% of the 73 patients with a final classification of affected.
The clinical profile of 108 newly diagnosed probands with suspected ARVC/D indicates that a combination of diagnostic tests is needed to evaluate the presence of right ventricular structural, functional, and electrical abnormalities. Echocardiography, right ventricular angiography, signal-averaged ECG, and Holter monitoring provide optimal clinical evaluation of patients suspected of ARVC/D.
Notes
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 1993 Nov-Dec;36(3):215-268234775
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Mar 6;39(5):892-511869858
Cites: Circulation. 1982 Feb;65(2):384-987053899
Cites: Am J Med. 2004 Nov 1;117(9):685-9515501207
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Sep 21;110(12):1527-3415381658
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Mar 15;45(6):860-515766820
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1988 Jan 21;318(3):129-333336399
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2000 Jan;21(1):58-6510610745
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 2000 May;53(5):382-710889821
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Oct 24;114(17):1794-517060394
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Oct 24;114(17):1799-80617030684
Cites: J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2004;6(3):601-815347124
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Dec;27(23):2879-8817088316
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2006 Dec 15;98(12):1660-417145230
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Apr 3;115(13):1710-2017372169
Cites: J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2008 Aug;19(8):775-8118373594
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Nov;29(22):2760-7118819962
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Dec 16;52(25):2175-8719095136
Cites: Circulation. 1994 Feb;89(2):667-838313555
Cites: Br Heart J. 1994 Mar;71(3):215-88142187
Cites: Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 1995 Jun;18(6):1298-3147659585
Cites: Arch Mal Coeur Vaiss. 1995 Jul;88(7):1021-87487318
Cites: Circulation. 1996 Sep 1;94(5):983-918790036
Cites: Circulation. 1998 Apr 28;97(16):1571-809593562
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1998 Sep 1;129(5):379-869735066
Cites: Acta Cardiol. 1999 Aug;54(4):189-9410511894
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2005 Aug;26(16):1666-7515941723
Cites: Cardiology. 2005;104(1):10-515942177
Cites: Circulation. 2005 Dec 20;112(25):3823-3216344387
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003 Dec 3;42(11):1959-6314662259
Cites: J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2004 Mar;15(3):300-615030420
Cites: J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2004;6(2):557-6315137340
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Jun 16;43(12):2305-1315193698
Cites: Heart Rhythm. 2006 Feb;3(2):225-3416443541
Cites: J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2006 Jun;17(6):586-9316836703
Cites: Ann Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 2003 Jul;8(3):238-4514510660
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Aug;24(16):1473-8012919770
Cites: Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2003 Jul;26(7 Pt 1):1498-50312914628
Cites: Cardiology. 2003;99(3):153-6212824723
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Jun 17;107(23):2975-812814984
Comment In: Heart Rhythm. 2009 Nov;6(11):e1; author reply e1-219879529
PubMed ID
19560088 View in PubMed
Less detail

ASD and PFO closure with the Solysafe septal occluder - results of a prospective multicenter pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87344
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2008 Feb 15;71(3):398-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2008
Author
Ewert Peter
Söderberg Bjoern
Dähnert Ingo
Hess Otto
Schuler Gerhard
Bussmann Christiane
Bernhard Jerome
Sick Peter
Author Affiliation
Abt. für angeborene Herzfehler, Deutsches Herzzentrum, Berlin, Germany. ewert@dhzb.de
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2008 Feb 15;71(3):398-402
Date
Feb-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Balloon Occlusion - instrumentation - methods
Child
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Foramen Ovale, Patent - diagnosis - therapy
Heart Catheterization
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Implantation - methods
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We report the results of a prospective multicenter pilot study performed in Germany, Sweden, and Switzerland with a new self-centering device for transcatheter closure of an atrial septal defect (ASD) or a patent foramen ovale (PFO) called the Solysafe Septal Occluder. INTERVENTIONS: The device was successfully implanted in 44 patients. In 15 patients with a median age of 40 years (range 6-76 years), a Solysafe device was successfully implanted in an ASD. The median size of the stretched defects was 17 mm (range 10-21 mm). Three 15-mm devices, eight 20-mm devices, and four 25-mm devices were used. Procedure time ranged from 40 to 107 min (median 66 min) and fluoroscopic time from 5.3 to 17.5 min (median 12 min). In 29 patients with a median age of 47 years (range 15-78 years), a Solysafe device was implanted in a PFO. The procedure time ranged from 21 to 155 min (median 51 min) and fluoroscopic time from 3.1 to 31.3 min (median 7.6 min). RESULTS: At discharge, 1 of the 29 patients (3%) had a small shunt. No patient in either the ASD or the PFO group had any major complication. Six months after implantation, the overall closure rate with the Solysafe septal occluder in both groups was 100% (44/44). CONCLUSION: With the self-centering Solysafe Septal Occluder, PFOs, and ASDs with a stretched diameter of up to 21 mm can be effectively closed with very high occlusion rates.
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2008 Feb 15;71(3):403-418288746
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2008 Feb 15;71(3):41718288749
PubMed ID
18288739 View in PubMed
Less detail

175 records – page 1 of 18.