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714 records – page 1 of 72.

1816 textbook suggests use of electric shock in treatment of cardiac arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176842
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Dec;20(14):1486
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004

Abeta oligomer-mediated long-term potentiation impairment involves protein phosphatase 1-dependent mechanisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162439
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-18-2007
Author
Marlen Knobloch
Mélissa Farinelli
Uwe Konietzko
Roger M Nitsch
Isabelle M Mansuy
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Date
Jul-18-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases - genetics
Amyloid beta-Peptides - chemistry - metabolism - ultrastructure
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases - genetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Electric Stimulation - methods
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials - drug effects - physiology
Gene Expression Regulation - genetics
Hippocampus - cytology
Humans
Long-Term Potentiation - genetics - physiology - radiation effects
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission - methods
Neurons - drug effects - physiology
Patch-Clamp Techniques
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases - physiology
Presenilin-1 - genetics
Protein Phosphatase 1
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Abstract
Amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers are derived from proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and can impair memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo and in vitro. They are recognized as the primary neurotoxic agents in Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms underlying such toxicity on synaptic functions are complex and not fully understood. Here, we provide the first evidence that these mechanisms involve protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Using a novel transgenic mouse model expressing human APP with the Swedish and Arctic mutations that render Abeta more prone to form oligomers (arcAbeta mice), we show that the LTP impairment induced by Abeta oligomers can be fully reversed by PP1 inhibition in vitro. We further demonstrate that the genetic inhibition of endogenous PP1 in vivo confers resistance to Abeta oligomer-mediated toxicity and preserves LTP. Overall, these results reveal that PP1 is a key player in the mechanisms of AD pathology.
PubMed ID
17634359 View in PubMed
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Abnormal brain processing in hepatic encephalopathy: evidence of cerebral reorganization?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141910
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Rolf Ankerlund Blauenfeldt
Søren Schou Olesen
Jesper Bach Hansen
Carina Graversen
Asbjørn Mohr Drewes
Author Affiliation
Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Aged
Auditory Perception
Brain - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Brain Waves
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Electric Stimulation
Electroencephalography
Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory
Evoked Potentials, Visual
Female
Functional Laterality
Hepatic Encephalopathy - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Median Nerve - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Neural Conduction
Neuropsychological Tests
Photic Stimulation
Psychometrics
Reaction Time
Time Factors
Abstract
Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe and frequent complication of liver cirrhosis characterized by abnormal cerebral function. Little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms in HE and human data are sparse. Electrophysiological methods such as evoked brain potentials after somatic stimuli can be combined with inverse modeling of the underlying brain activity. Thereby, information on neuronal dynamics and brain activity can be studied in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensory brain processing in patients with HE.
Twelve patients with minimal or overt HE and 26 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Cerebral sensory processing was investigated as (i) an auditory reaction time task; (ii) visual and somatosensory evoked brain potentials, and (iii) reconstruction of the underlying brain activity.
Somatosensory evoked potentials were reproducible (all P>0.05), whereas flash evoked potentials were not reproducible (all P
PubMed ID
20661140 View in PubMed
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Abnormalities of somatosensory evoked potentials in konzo--an upper motor neuron disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31785
Source
Clin Neurophysiol. 2002 Jan;113(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
D. Tshala-Katumbay
K. Edebol Eeg-Olofsson
T. Kazadi-Kayembe
Peo Fällmar
Thorkild Tylleskär
T. Kayembe-Kalula
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Kinshasa, Congo.
Source
Clin Neurophysiol. 2002 Jan;113(1):10-5
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Electric Stimulation
Electroencephalography
Electromyography
Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory - physiology
Female
Humans
Laterality - physiology
Male
Median Nerve - physiology
Middle Aged
Motor Neuron Disease - physiopathology
Neural Conduction - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tibial Nerve - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the somatosensory pathways are involved or not in konzo. METHODS: In 1998, 21 konzo subjects (15 females and 6 males; mean age 21 years) underwent a SEP study with a two-channel-equipment (Medtronic Keypoint, Denmark) whereas in 2000, 15 subjects (7 females and 8 males; mean age 21 years) participated in a study with a 4-channel-equipment. RESULTS: Most subjects (19/21 in 1998 and 12/15 in 2000) showed normal median SEPs. The remainders had no median cortical responses. All 21 subjects in 1998 and 9 out of 15 in 2000 showed abnormalities of tibial SEPs mainly consisting of absence of cortical responses, prolonged cortical latencies, and central sensory delay to the lumbar spine. Most subjects showed normal absolute latencies both at peripheral and spinal levels. The SEP findings did not correlate with the severity, neither the duration of konzo, nor the experience or not of sensory symptoms at the onset of the disease. CONCLUSION: Our findings are not specific of konzo. However, they suggest involvement of intracranial somatosensory pathways and point to similarities with other motor neuron diseases.
PubMed ID
11801419 View in PubMed
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Accidental deaths caused by electricity in Sweden, 1975-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79263
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2006 Nov;51(6):1383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Lindström Richard
Bylund Per-Olof
Eriksson Anders
Author Affiliation
Section of Forensic Medicine, Department of Community Health and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, PO Box 7616, SE-907 12 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2006 Nov;51(6):1383-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arrhythmia - etiology - mortality
Central Nervous System Depressants - blood - urine
Child
Child, Preschool
Electric Injuries - mortality
Ethanol - blood - urine
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study analyzes accidental fatalities caused by electricity--at work and during leisure time--to evaluate risk factors, the role of alcohol, and to identify possible preventive strategies. In Sweden, data on fatalities by electrocution from 1975 through 2000 were collected from the National Cause-of-Death Register. Additional cases were found in the archives of The Swedish National Electrical Safety Board. Suicides and deaths by lightning were excluded. Two hundred and eighty-five deaths were found, including occupational (n=132), leisure time (n=151), and unknown (n=2). Most deaths were caused by aerial power lines, and the most common place for an electrical injury was a railway area or residential property. Postmortem blood from 20% (n=47) of the tested cases was found positive for alcohol, and these persons were killed mainly during leisure time. During the study period, the overall incidence of electricity-related fatalities has decreased, in spite of increased use of electricity. This indicates that safety improvements have been successful.
PubMed ID
17199625 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of static electricity on arctic clothing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297202
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-63-12.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1963
Author
Veghte, J.H.
Millard, W.W.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report AAL-TDR-63-12.
Date
May 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Humans
Clothing
Static Electricity
Less detail

Accuracy of quantitative magnetic resonance and eight-electrode bioelectrical impedance analysis in normal weight and obese women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258595
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Jun;33(3):471-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Marja Bosaeus
Therese Karlsson
Agneta Holmäng
Lars Ellegård
Source
Clin Nutr. 2014 Jun;33(3):471-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electric Impedance
Electrodes
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis
Plethysmography - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) has previously been shown to both overestimate and underestimate average fat mass (FM) in humans. Eight-electrode bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has previously been found biased as well as successfully validated. We report cross-sectional accuracy of QMR and eight-electrode BIA evaluated with air displacement plethysmography (ADP) as reference method.
Fat mass and fat free mass (FFM) by QMR and eight-electrode BIA were evaluated against ADP as reference in 38 normal weight and 30 obese women. Total body water estimates by QMR and eight-electrode BIA were compared.
Fat mass was overestimated by QMR (1 ± 2 kg, p
PubMed ID
23871192 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative evaluation of the electric impulse treatment of atrial fibrillation based on the data from 2 clinics. 2. The late results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222308
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(8):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
A V Nedostup
M A Alekseevskaia
A I Lukoshevichute
I R Pechiulene
Iu V Vaitekunene
I V Maevskaia
A L Syrkin
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(8):29-31
Date
1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Electric Countershock - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lithuania - epidemiology
Moscow - epidemiology
Recurrence
Time Factors
Abstract
Long-term results of electroimpulse treatment for cardiac fibrillation in 1292 patients performed in cardiological clinics of Moscow and Kaunas have been compared. It is shown that more strict selection, longer preparation for the impulse exposure may secure a significant decrease in the number of the fibrillation recurrences both 1 and 6 months after recovery of the normal rhythm.
PubMed ID
8211796 View in PubMed
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714 records – page 1 of 72.