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Abeta oligomer-mediated long-term potentiation impairment involves protein phosphatase 1-dependent mechanisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162439
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-18-2007
Author
Marlen Knobloch
Mélissa Farinelli
Uwe Konietzko
Roger M Nitsch
Isabelle M Mansuy
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Date
Jul-18-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases - genetics
Amyloid beta-Peptides - chemistry - metabolism - ultrastructure
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases - genetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Electric Stimulation - methods
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials - drug effects - physiology
Gene Expression Regulation - genetics
Hippocampus - cytology
Humans
Long-Term Potentiation - genetics - physiology - radiation effects
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission - methods
Neurons - drug effects - physiology
Patch-Clamp Techniques
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases - physiology
Presenilin-1 - genetics
Protein Phosphatase 1
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Abstract
Amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers are derived from proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and can impair memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo and in vitro. They are recognized as the primary neurotoxic agents in Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms underlying such toxicity on synaptic functions are complex and not fully understood. Here, we provide the first evidence that these mechanisms involve protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Using a novel transgenic mouse model expressing human APP with the Swedish and Arctic mutations that render Abeta more prone to form oligomers (arcAbeta mice), we show that the LTP impairment induced by Abeta oligomers can be fully reversed by PP1 inhibition in vitro. We further demonstrate that the genetic inhibition of endogenous PP1 in vivo confers resistance to Abeta oligomer-mediated toxicity and preserves LTP. Overall, these results reveal that PP1 is a key player in the mechanisms of AD pathology.
PubMed ID
17634359 View in PubMed
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Abnormal brain processing in hepatic encephalopathy: evidence of cerebral reorganization?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141910
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Rolf Ankerlund Blauenfeldt
Søren Schou Olesen
Jesper Bach Hansen
Carina Graversen
Asbjørn Mohr Drewes
Author Affiliation
Mech-Sense, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2010 Nov;22(11):1323-30
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Aged
Auditory Perception
Brain - physiopathology
Brain Mapping
Brain Waves
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Electric Stimulation
Electroencephalography
Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory
Evoked Potentials, Visual
Female
Functional Laterality
Hepatic Encephalopathy - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Median Nerve - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Neural Conduction
Neuropsychological Tests
Photic Stimulation
Psychometrics
Reaction Time
Time Factors
Abstract
Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe and frequent complication of liver cirrhosis characterized by abnormal cerebral function. Little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms in HE and human data are sparse. Electrophysiological methods such as evoked brain potentials after somatic stimuli can be combined with inverse modeling of the underlying brain activity. Thereby, information on neuronal dynamics and brain activity can be studied in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensory brain processing in patients with HE.
Twelve patients with minimal or overt HE and 26 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Cerebral sensory processing was investigated as (i) an auditory reaction time task; (ii) visual and somatosensory evoked brain potentials, and (iii) reconstruction of the underlying brain activity.
Somatosensory evoked potentials were reproducible (all P>0.05), whereas flash evoked potentials were not reproducible (all P
PubMed ID
20661140 View in PubMed
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Abnormalities of somatosensory evoked potentials in konzo--an upper motor neuron disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31785
Source
Clin Neurophysiol. 2002 Jan;113(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
D. Tshala-Katumbay
K. Edebol Eeg-Olofsson
T. Kazadi-Kayembe
Peo Fällmar
Thorkild Tylleskär
T. Kayembe-Kalula
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Kinshasa, Congo.
Source
Clin Neurophysiol. 2002 Jan;113(1):10-5
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Electric Stimulation
Electroencephalography
Electromyography
Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory - physiology
Female
Humans
Laterality - physiology
Male
Median Nerve - physiology
Middle Aged
Motor Neuron Disease - physiopathology
Neural Conduction - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tibial Nerve - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the somatosensory pathways are involved or not in konzo. METHODS: In 1998, 21 konzo subjects (15 females and 6 males; mean age 21 years) underwent a SEP study with a two-channel-equipment (Medtronic Keypoint, Denmark) whereas in 2000, 15 subjects (7 females and 8 males; mean age 21 years) participated in a study with a 4-channel-equipment. RESULTS: Most subjects (19/21 in 1998 and 12/15 in 2000) showed normal median SEPs. The remainders had no median cortical responses. All 21 subjects in 1998 and 9 out of 15 in 2000 showed abnormalities of tibial SEPs mainly consisting of absence of cortical responses, prolonged cortical latencies, and central sensory delay to the lumbar spine. Most subjects showed normal absolute latencies both at peripheral and spinal levels. The SEP findings did not correlate with the severity, neither the duration of konzo, nor the experience or not of sensory symptoms at the onset of the disease. CONCLUSION: Our findings are not specific of konzo. However, they suggest involvement of intracranial somatosensory pathways and point to similarities with other motor neuron diseases.
PubMed ID
11801419 View in PubMed
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[Action of electrical stimulation of the structures of the posterior hypothalamus on the acetylcholinesterase activity of the motor portion of the cortex normally and under pharmacological influences]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13137
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1977 Sep-Oct;23(5):591-8
Publication Type
Article

Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270208
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2015;15:180
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Linda Vixner
Lena B Mårtensson
Erica Schytt
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2015;15:180
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy
Adult
Electric Stimulation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Labor Pain - epidemiology - therapy
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a previous randomised controlled trial we showed that acupuncture with a combination of manual- and electrical stimulation (EA) did not affect the level of pain, as compared with acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA) and standard care (SC), but reduced the need for other forms of pain relief, including epidural analgesia. To dismiss an under-treatment of pain in the trial, we did a long-term follow up on the recollection of labour pain and the birth experience comparing acupuncture with manual stimulation, acupuncture with combined electrical and manual stimulation with standard care. Our hypothesis was that despite the lower frequency of use of other pain relief, women who had received EA would make similar retrospective assessments of labour pain and the birth experience 2 months after birth as women who received standard care (SC) or acupuncture with manual stimulation (MA).
Secondary analyses of data collected for a randomised controlled trial conducted at two delivery wards in Sweden. A total of 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 min of MA or EA, or SC without acupuncture. Questionnaires were administered the day after partus and 2 months later.
Two months postpartum, the mean recalled pain on the visual analogue scale (SC: 70.1, MA: 69.3 and EA: 68.7) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted mean difference 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] -6.3 to 7.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 1.3 CI 95% -5.5 to 8.1). Positive birth experience (SC: 54.3%, MA: 64.6% and EA: 61.0%) did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: adjusted Odds Ratio [OR] 1.8, CI 95% 0.9 to 3.7 and SC vs EA: OR 1.4 CI 95% 0.7 to 2.6).
Despite the lower use of other pain relief, women who received acupuncture with the combination of manual and electrical stimulation during labour made the same retrospective assessments of labour pain and birth experience 2 months postpartum as those who received acupuncture with manual stimulation or standard care.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01197950.
Notes
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Cites: Arch Womens Ment Health. 2005 Jun;8(2):97-10415883652
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2006 Jan;92(1):71-216253255
Cites: J Altern Complement Med. 2006 Apr;12(3):303-1016646730
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2006 Sep;27(3):147-5617214449
Cites: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2007 Feb;47(1):26-3017261096
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2008 Feb;106(2):602-1018227322
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(2):171-718231884
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2008 Aug;47(8):1132-618460551
Cites: Prog Neurobiol. 2008 Aug;85(4):355-7518582529
Cites: Acupunct Med. 2008 Dec;26(4):239-4219098696
Cites: BJOG. 2009 Mar;116(4):577-8319076128
Cites: Birth. 2009 Mar;36(1):5-1219278378
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010;89(2):238-4219824867
Cites: BMJ. 2010;340:c86920332511
Cites: BJOG. 2010 Jul;117(8):907-2020438555
Cites: PLoS Med. 2010 Jun;7(6):e100026120543992
Cites: Birth. 2000 Dec;27(4):244-5311251509
Cites: BJOG. 2002 Mar;109(3):254-6011950179
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2002 Oct;81(10):943-812366485
PubMed ID
26066641 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture with manual and low frequency electrical stimulation as experienced by women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125543
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Annika Billhult
Elisabet Stener-Victorin
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit of the County Södra Älvsborg, Sven Eriksonsplatsen 4, 503 38 Borås, Sweden. annika.billhult@vgregion.se
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:32
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods - psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Electric Stimulation - methods
Electroacupuncture - methods - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Hyperandrogenism - therapy
Interviews as Topic
Menstruation
Ovulation
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - psychology - therapy
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10 percent of all fertile women and is associated with anovulation/oligoovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Pharmacological treatment is often effective but associated with unwanted side effects. Acupuncture treatments have been shown to improve menstrual bleeding patterns and ovulation as well as hyperandrogenism, without side effects. The purpose of the present study was to describe the experience of acupuncture for women diagnosed with PCOS.
Eight women with PCOS living in western Sweden, were interviewed following repeated acupuncture treatments. Data was analyzed using systematic text condensation as described by Malterud.
The experience of acupuncture for women diagnosed with PCOS can be described in five categories; the experience of hope, getting results, feelings of responsibility, skepticism and proof of effect, and feeling normal.
Since acupuncture is a promising treatment for the symptoms of the common syndrome PCOS, the present study adds to the knowledge base by providing the important experiences of patients receiving the treatment. Acupuncture provides a possibility for patients to gain hope as the treatment shows results. The results show that acupuncture empowers the patients to take responsibility for their future well-being, although they may have been initially skeptical to the treatment. Because the syndrome had affected them for some time, even small changes offered a chance for them to feel that their bodies were capable of normal function.
Notes
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Oct;114(4):936-4919888063
Cites: Complement Ther Med. 2009 Oct-Dec;17(5-6):269-7319942106
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2009 Aug;297(2):R387-9519494176
Cites: Acupunct Electrother Res. 1991;16(1-2):1-51674830
Cites: Fam Pract. 1993 Jun;10(2):201-68359612
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 2006 Jul;101(1):84-9116514000
Cites: Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2007 Apr;47(2):145-917355306
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Aug 25;370(9588):685-9717720020
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Mar;79(3):180-810716298
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2004 Jan;19(1):41-714688154
Cites: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2011 Nov-Dec;40(6):709-1822092488
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2012 Jan;97(1):28-38.e2522153789
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Oct;96(10):3143-5021816787
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Jun;61(587):e306-1521801509
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2011 Aug;96(2):452-821703610
Cites: J Altern Complement Med. 2011 Jun;17(6):519-2921649518
Cites: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Jan;300(1):E37-4520943753
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 May;32(5):453-920500954
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2010 May 1;93(7):2169-7420338559
Cites: Hum Reprod. 2010 Feb;25(2):450-619933236
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;33(3):382-41119597976
PubMed ID
22471422 View in PubMed
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Aging augments interstitial K+ concentrations in active muscle of rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83052
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2006 Apr;100(4):1158-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Li Jianhua
Sinoway Lawrence I
Ng Yuk-Chow
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Dr., Hershey, PA 17033, USA.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2006 Apr;100(4):1158-63
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Electric Stimulation
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Muscle Contraction
Muscle, Skeletal - drug effects - innervation - metabolism
Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Ouabain - pharmacology
Potassium - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Sciatic Nerve
Time Factors
Abstract
Skeletal muscle performance declines with advancing age, and the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. A large body of convincing evidence has demonstrated a crucial role for interstitial K+ concentration ([K+]o) in modulating contractile function of skeletal muscle. The present study tested the hypothesis that during muscle contraction there is a greater accumulation of [K+]o in aged compared with adult skeletal muscle. Twitch muscle contraction was induced by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerves of 8- and 32-mo-old Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats. Levels of [K+]o were measured continuously by a microdialysis technique with the probes inserted into the gastrocnemius muscle. Stimulation at 1, 3, and 5 Hz elevated muscle [K+]o by 52, 64, and 88% in adult rats, and by 78, 98, and 104% in aged rats, respectively, and the increase was significantly higher in aged than in adult rats. Recovery for [K+]o, as measured by the time for [K+]o to recover by 20 and 50% from peak response after stimulation, was slower in aged rats. Ouabain (5 mM), a specific inhibitor of the Na+-K+ pump, was added in the perfusate to inhibit the reuptake of K+ into the cells to assess the role of the pump in the overall K+ balance. Ouabain elevated muscle [K+]o at rest, and the effect was significantly attenuated in aged animals. The present data demonstrated an augmented [K+]o in aged skeletal muscle compared with adult skeletal muscle, and the data suggested that an alteration in the function of the Na+-K+ pump may contribute, in part, to the deficiency in K+ balance in skeletal muscle of aged rats.
PubMed ID
16322369 View in PubMed
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Analysis of direct hospital costs before and 18 months after treatment with vagus nerve stimulation therapy in 43 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188453
Source
Neurology. 2002 Sep 24;59(6 Suppl 4):S44-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-24-2002
Author
Elinor Ben-Menachem
Karina Hellström
Daniel Verstappen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology Division, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, 413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Neurology. 2002 Sep 24;59(6 Suppl 4):S44-7
Date
Sep-24-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Direct Service Costs - statistics & numerical data
Electric Stimulation Therapy - economics
Emergency Service, Hospital - economics
Epilepsies, Partial - economics - therapy
Female
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - economics
Humans
Intensive Care Units - economics - utilization
Length of Stay
Male
Sweden
Vagus Nerve - physiology
Abstract
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy is an established method for treating patients with refractory seizures. Although the initial cost of the device is about 10,000 US dollars, the battery life of the model 100 implanted in the patients in this analysis can exceed 5 years at standard settings. It is important to understand what type of cost-benefit can be expected after implantation. Our aim was to assess unplanned hospital costs 18 months before and 18 months after VNS implantation in 43 patients. The VNS therapy system was implanted according to standard procedures and stimulation of 0.75 to 2.0 mA was delivered either as 30 seconds on and 5 minutes off or 7 seconds on and 14 seconds off. Seizure frequency was calculated before and after 18 months of treatment. During this time no changes were made with other therapies for epilepsy. Hospitalization for emergency room (ER) visits, ward stays, and intensive care days were calculated according to the costs at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden. Therapy response was defined as 25% or greater reduction in seizure frequency. For all patients, intensive care unit (ICU) costs were reduced from 46,875 to 0 US dollars, ER visits from 13,000 to 9,000 US dollars, and ward stays from 151,125 to 21,375 US dollars. Total hospital costs for the 43 patients studied before VNS therapy were 211,000 US dollars and after 18 months of treatment were reduced to 30,375 US dollars, an average annual cost savings of approximately 3,000 US dollars per patient. The cost savings applied to all patients, irrespective of whether they responded to VNS therapy. VNS therapy resulted in annual reductions of approximately 3000 US dollars in unplanned hospital costs per study patient. Such direct savings sustained over the battery life of the VNS therapy system can equal or exceed the purchase price of the device.
PubMed ID
12270968 View in PubMed
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An experimental study of visual averaged evoked responses (V. AER) and pain measures (PM) in patients with depressive disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249126
Source
Biol Psychol. 1978 Jan;6(1):27-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1978
Author
L. von Knorring
Source
Biol Psychol. 1978 Jan;6(1):27-38
Date
Jan-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - physiopathology
Depression - physiopathology
Electric Stimulation
Evoked Potentials
Humans
Methods
Neurotic Disorders - physiopathology
Pain - physiopathology
Photic Stimulation
Psychotic Disorders - physiopathology
Visual perception
Abstract
In a group of 100 patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry in Umeå between January 1973 and July 1974 with depressive syndromes, pain measures - PM - and visual averaged evoked responses - V.AER - have been investigated and the patients have been rated by the doctor by means of the Cronholm-Ottosson depression rating scale. According to the results of V. AER patients have been grouped as augmenters or reducers, depending upon the tendency to augment or to reduce the intensity of incoming signals with increasing stimulus intensity. V. AER are found to vary with age but not with sex. Differences are found between patients with and those without a psychotic dimension of their depressive syndromes. Patients with depressive syndromes of psychotic dimension tend more often to be reducers. When patients are divided according to diagnostic groups no differences are found. PM are found to vary with sex and detection threshold - DT - are found to vary with age while pain threshold - PT - tolerance level - TL - and pain endurance - PE - do not vary with age. Patients with depressive syndromes of a psychotic dimension are found to have higher PM while there is no consistent picture when patients are divided according to diagnostic groups. Possible explanations for contradictory results found by other authors are discussed.
PubMed ID
623856 View in PubMed
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The association of fibrinolysis and hyperlipidaemia with quantitative sensory tests in an epidemiological study of Swedish type 1 diabetic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48376
Source
Diabet Med. 1995 Jul;12(7):590-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
F. Lithner
T. Bergenheim
B. Borssén
G. Dahlén
T K Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 1995 Jul;12(7):590-4
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Cholesterol - blood
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Diabetic Neuropathies - epidemiology - physiopathology
Electric Stimulation
Female
Fibrinolysis
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - epidemiology
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - blood
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sensory Thresholds
Sweden - epidemiology
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - blood
Triglycerides - blood
Vibration
Abstract
Serum levels of cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein Lp(a), and the fibrinolysis factors tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) and PAI-1 activity (plasminogen activator inhibitor) were compared with sensory thresholds for vibration, electrical current perception, and pain in a population-based study comprising 239 patients with diabetes mellitus Type 1, aged 15-50 years. Univariate regression analyses (n = 180) showed significant correlations between elevated sensory thresholds and age, duration of diabetes, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and HbA1c. In multivariate regression analysis, age, duration of diabetes, height, and serum triglycerides showed significant independent associations with five or six of the six measured sensory threshold variables. In addition there was a significant association between increased thresholds for vibration and Lp(a) levels. Thus, increased sensory thresholds for vibration, current perception, and pain in patients with Type 1 diabetes are associated with increased serum triglyceride levels, and Lp(a) levels are associated with increased threshold for vibration. Fibrinolytic activity is unrelated to these measures of nerve function in Type 1 diabetic patients.
PubMed ID
7554780 View in PubMed
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176 records – page 1 of 18.