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38 records – page 1 of 4.

Adult Scandinavians' use of powered scooters: user satisfaction, frequency of use, and prediction of daily use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295765
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2018 04; 13(3):212-219
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Terje Sund
Åse Brandt
Author Affiliation
a Department of Assistive Technology , The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service , Oslo , Norway.
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2018 04; 13(3):212-219
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Electric Power Supplies
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Reproducibility of Results
Wheelchairs
Abstract
To investigate user satisfaction with characteristics of powered scooters (scooters), frequency of use, and factors predicting daily scooter use.
Cross-sectional.
Adult scooter users (n?=?59) in Denmark and Norway, mean age 74.5 (standard deviation 12.3) years.
Structured face-to-face interviews. The NOMO 1.0, the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive devices (QUEST 2.0), and a study specific instrument were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics were applied, and regression analyzes were used to investigate predictors for daily scooter use. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) served as a framework for classifying variables and guiding the investigation.
Satisfaction with the scooter characteristics was high with most participants being very satisfied or quite satisfied (66.1-91.5%). Most scooters were used daily (36.2%) or several times a week (50.0%). User satisfaction with safety of the scooter [odds ratio (OR)?=?11.76, confidence interval (CI)?=?1.70-81.28] and reduced balance (OR?=?5.63, CI?=?0.90-35.39) increased the likelihood of daily use, while reduced function in back and/or legs (OR?=?.04, CI?=?0.00-0.75), tiredness (OR?=?.06, CI?=?0.01-0.51), and increased age (OR?=?.93, CI?=?0.87-1.00) reduced the likelihood of daily use. 52.8% of the variance was explained by these variables.
User satisfaction was high, and most scooters were used frequently. User satisfaction with safety, specific functional limitations and age were predictors for daily scooter use. Implications for Rehabilitation Scooters seem to be a beneficial intervention for people with mobility impairment: user satisfaction and frequency of use are high. Users' subjective feeling of safety should be secured in the service delivery process in order to support safe and frequent scooter use. Training of scooter skills should be considered in the service delivery process.
PubMed ID
28366104 View in PubMed
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Air quality during the winter in Qu├ębec day-care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224262
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S. Daneault
M. Beausoleil
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Biological Interactions between Health and Environment, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Electric Power Supplies
Environmental monitoring
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Heating - methods - standards
Humans
Humidity
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Quebec
Temperature
Time Factors
Ventilation - methods - standards
Abstract
Over 90% of 91 day care centers in greater Montréal, Québec exceeded 1000 ppm of CO2 during January through April 1989. Four variables were independent positive predictors of CO2 levels: the density of children in the center; presence of electric heating; absence of a ventilation system; and building age. High levels of CO2 are associated with respiratory tract and other symptoms. Clear standards and inspection policies should be established for day care center air quality.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Dec 2;299(6712):1388-902513974
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Jan;29(1):57-623546636
Cites: Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1985;36:1-393866314
Cites: Environ Res. 1989 Oct;50(1):37-552792060
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 8;289(6458):1573-56439323
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1986 Jul-Aug;8(4):514-203529306
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1987 May;79(5):685-7003571762
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1985 Aug 10;291(6492):373-63926199
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1175-73407814
PubMed ID
1536362 View in PubMed
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An effective prevention program to reduce electrical burn injuries caused by the use of multimeters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145236
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2010 Mar-Apr;31(2):333-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter A Marcucci
Steve Smith
Manuel Gomez
Joel S Fish
Author Affiliation
Electrical Safety Authority, Department of Regulatory Affairs, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Burn Care Res. 2010 Mar-Apr;31(2):333-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Burns, Electric - epidemiology - prevention & control
Electric Power Supplies - standards
Equipment Safety
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the circumstances of electrical burn injuries caused by the use of multimeters among electricians and electrical apprentices in Ontario and to develop a burn prevention program to reduce them. A survey to investigate electrical injuries caused by multimeters was mailed in June 2004 to 5000 Ontario electricians and electrical apprentices. A high voltage laboratory tested the effectiveness of fused leads to reduce multimeters malfunction. The results of the survey and laboratory tests helped to implement a burn prevention program. Then, a mail fused leads multimeter exchange program was implemented, and proposals to improve the multimeters standard were made to the Canadian Standards Association. Nine hundred (18%) workers responded the survey. There were 801 (89%) electricians, 81 (9%) electrical apprentices, and 27 (3%) with other qualifications. Ninety-nine (11%) had a multimeter fail during use, and half of them suffered critical burns. Causes of the injury were operator error (59%), wrong category rating (21%), defective equipment (18%), and others (2%). More than 2000 electrical contractors acquired the new fused leads multimeters. There were no critical injuries caused by multimeters in the years 2006, 2007, and 2008 (January to August) in Ontario. Understanding the cause of electrical burn injuries by multimeters and engaging members of the integrated electrical safety system in a multifaceted prevention program were effective in reducing electrical burn injuries. Fused leads multimeters proved to be effective in preventing most common user errors and electrical burn injuries caused by multimeters.
PubMed ID
20182365 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the severity of injuries to hands by powered wood splitters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135799
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2010 Nov;44(4-5):237-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Aron Lindqvist
Maria Berglund
Johanna von Kieseritzky
Olle Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. aron_lindqvist@yahoo.se
Source
J Plast Surg Hand Surg. 2010 Nov;44(4-5):237-44
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amputation, Traumatic - epidemiology - radiography - surgery
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Electric Power Supplies - adverse effects
Equipment Design
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Foreign Bodies - epidemiology - radiography
Hand Injuries - epidemiology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Orthopedic Procedures - methods
Recovery of Function
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Wood
Young Adult
Abstract
Our aim was to rate the severity of injuries to hands by powered wood splitters. The patients were identified from a computerised registry, and the cause of injury was confirmed by written questionnaire and structured telephone interview. Information about the anatomy of the injury was gathered from patients' records and radiographs. Severity of injury was rated according to the Hand Injury Severity Scoring System (HISS system) and the Injury Severity Score (ISS). The reliability of HISS rating was tested. The mean Hand Injury Severity Score (HISS) was 63 and the mean ISS was 3.7. Twenty-five (19%) of patients had minor, 41 (31%) had moderate, 30 (23%) had severe, and 35 (27 %) had major injuries when scored by the HISS system. Children's injuries were more severe than those of adults. There was no difference in severity between injuries made by wedge and screw splitters. It is not possible to avoid serious hand injuries from powered wood splitters completely by prohibiting one of the two main types of splitter.
PubMed ID
21446821 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric deposition of trace elements around point sources and human health risk assessment. I: Impact zones near a source of lead emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36598
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):243-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1992
Author
L. Moseholm
E H Larsen
B. Andersen
M M Nielsen
Author Affiliation
COWIconsult, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):243-62
Date
Sep-25-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis
Automobiles
Child
Child, Preschool
Eating
Electric Power Supplies - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lead - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Poaceae - chemistry - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry - metabolism
Abstract
The deposition of lead was monitored over 8 years in the area around a car battery factory north of Copenhagen, Denmark. The area also has heavy traffic. Deposition was measured by in-situ grown vegetables, transplant grass culture biomonitors, bulk deposition and soil samples. Three impact zones were identified by a multivariate statistical analysis. Within each zone, the total dietary intake of lead was estimated for adults and children as a percentage of the provisional tolerably weekly intake (PTWI), and as a result recommendation on restrictions in use of locally grown fruit and vegetables were given to the public. The pattern of lead deposition in the area during the period 1981-1988 was monitored and the amount of lead ingested via vegetables was toxically evaluated. Lead emission reduction measures introduced in the factory and in the traffic during the period produced significant reductions in lead deposition.
PubMed ID
1439754 View in PubMed
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Effects of industrial wind turbine noise on sleep and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119272
Source
Noise Health. 2012 Sep-Oct;14(60):237-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Michael A Nissenbaum
Jeffery J Aramini
Christopher D Hanning
Author Affiliation
Northern Maine Medical Center, Fort Kent, Maine 04743, USA. mnissenbaum@att.net
Source
Noise Health. 2012 Sep-Oct;14(60):237-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electric Power Supplies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Noise - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Rural Health
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Wind
Abstract
Industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are a new source of noise in previously quiet rural environments. Environmental noise is a public health concern, of which sleep disruption is a major factor. To compare sleep and general health outcomes between participants living close to IWTs and those living further away from them, participants living between 375 and 1400 m (n = 38) and 3.3 and 6.6 km (n = 41) from IWTs were enrolled in a stratified cross-sectional study involving two rural sites. Validated questionnaires were used to collect information on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index - PSQI), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score - ESS), and general health (SF36v2), together with psychiatric disorders, attitude, and demographics. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate the effect of the main exposure variable of interest (distance to the nearest IWT) on various health outcome measures. Participants living within 1.4 km of an IWT had worse sleep, were sleepier during the day, and had worse SF36 Mental Component Scores compared to those living further than 1.4 km away. Significant dose-response relationships between PSQI, ESS, SF36 Mental Component Score, and log-distance to the nearest IWT were identified after controlling for gender, age, and household clustering. The adverse event reports of sleep disturbance and ill health by those living close to IWTs are supported.
Notes
Comment In: Noise Health. 2013 Mar-Apr;15(63):148-5023571306
Comment In: Noise Health. 2013 Mar-Apr;15(63):150-223571307
PubMed ID
23117539 View in PubMed
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The effects of lead sulfate on new sealed lead acid batteries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199117
Source
J Emerg Med. 2000 Apr;18(3):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
M J Cleland
J P Maloney
B H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Biomedical Engineering, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Emerg Med. 2000 Apr;18(3):305-9
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Electric Countershock - instrumentation
Electric Power Supplies
Electronics
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Equipment Design
Equipment Safety
Humans
Lead - chemistry
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Emergency Medical Services (EMS) rely on batteries to power external cardiac defibrillators. While maintenance protocols should be followed to ensure that batteries possess adequate capacity to power their defibrillator, they are not often applied to new batteries. This study examines the effects of prolonged storage on sealed lead acid (SLA) batteries, the number of batteries that are affected by lead sulfate, and the ability of a protocol to restore the capacity in SLA batteries. A prospective cohort of new batteries was subjected to testing and discharge protocols. Initial battery capacities were measured using a battery analyzer. An "over-discharge" protocol fully discharged the battery over a 24-h period, and batteries were recharged and reanalyzed. Capacity measurements were repeated twice. Sulfate buildup was defined a priori as final capacity measurements greater than predischarge measurements. There were 126 batteries studied, a mean of 14 months after manufacture. Overall, 47 batteries (36.5%) had measured capacity that was insufficient ( 65%) whose average improvement was 9.3%. After discharge, there was an average of 17% improvement in the measured capacity, with no differences in the final capacity readings in each battery type. In conclusion, sealed lead acid batteries are affected by prolonged storage. The loss of capacity created by accumulation of lead sulfate can be reversed if battery maintenance protocols are used as part of EMS quality assurance programs.
PubMed ID
10729667 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of active equipment protecting distal parts of hands and feet against cold].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257739
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2014;(7):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
I V Ivanov
R F Afranas'eva
T K Losik
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2014;(7):39-44
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Temperature Regulation - physiology
Cold Temperature
Electric Power Supplies
Equipment Design
Foot
Gloves, Protective
Hand
Heating - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Protective Clothing
Russia
Skin Temperature - physiology
Abstract
Experimental studies covered thermoregulatory reactions of feet and hands, when using equipment protecting distal parts of hands and feet and using "active" heating (electric heating and thermochemical heater). Findings are that "active" heaters with output range 4-8 watt, as electrically heated inserts in gauntlets and welts, at air temperatures of -5 to -10 degrees C maintained average skin temperature of hand at 17-20 degrees C; using "active" heaters with output of 12 watt increased heat insulation of gauntlets and shoes up to 0.609-0.609 degrees C x m2/watt--that enables to conduct averagely hard work at cold climate up to 2 hours in all climate regions--IA (special), IB (climate zone IV), II (climate zone III) and III (climate zone II). Using 2 thermochemical heaters in gauntlets prevented local cooling, and heat insulation of the gauntlets therefore increased 1.6 times--that enables to widen temperature range of safe usage of equipment protecting hands against cold up to climate region II (climate zone III) during continuous physical work of average hardiness in cold climate up to 2 hours.
PubMed ID
25282802 View in PubMed
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Financial impact of spinal cord stimulation on the healthcare budget: a comparative analysis of costs in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150044
Source
J Neurosurg Spine. 2009 Jun;10(6):564-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Krishna Kumar
Sharon Bishop
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Saskatchewan, Regina General Hospital, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Krishma.kumar@rqhealth.ca
Source
J Neurosurg Spine. 2009 Jun;10(6):564-73
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Budgets
Canada
Databases, Factual
Electric Power Supplies - economics
Electric Stimulation Therapy - economics
Electrodes, Implanted - economics
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain, Intractable - economics - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Cord
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Many institutions with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) programs fail to realize that besides the initial implantation cost, budgetary allocation must be made to address annual maintenance costs as well as complications as they arise. Complications remain the major contributing factor to the overall expense of SCS. The authors present a formula that, when applied, provides a realistic representation of the actual costs necessary to implant and maintain SCS systems in Canada and the US.
The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 197 cases involving SCS (161 implanted and 36 failed trial stimulations) between 1995 and 2006. The cost of patient workup, initial implantation, annual maintenance, and resources necessary to resolve complications were assessed for each case and a unit cost applied. The total cost allocated for each case was determined by summing across healthcare resource headings. Using the same parameters, the unit cost was calculated in both Canadian (CAD) and US dollars (USD) at 2007 prices.
The cost of implanting a SCS system in Canada is $21,595 (CAD), in US Medicare $32,882 (USD), and in US Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) $57,896 (USD). The annual maintenance cost of an uncomplicated case in Canada is $3539 (CAD), in US Medicare $5071 (USD), and in BCBS $7277 (USD). The mean cost of a complication was $5191 in Canada (range $136-18,837 [CAD]). In comparison, in the US the figures were $9649 (range $381-28,495) for Medicare and $21,390 (range $573-54,547) for BCBS (both USD). Using these calculations a formula was derived as follows: the annual maintenance cost (a) was added to the average annual cost per complication per patient implanted (b); the sum was then divided by the implantation cost (c); and the result was multiplied by 100 to obtain a percentage (a + b / c x 100). To make this budgetary cap universally applicable, the results from the application of the formula were averaged, resulting in an 18% premium.
For budgeting purposes the institution should first calculate the initial implantation costs that then can be "grossed up" by 18% per annum. This amount of 18% should be in addition to the implantation costs for the individual institution for new patients, as well as for each actively managed patient. This resulting amount will cover the costs associated with annual maintenance and complications for every actively managed patient. As the initial cost of implantation in any country reflects their current economics, the formula provided will be applicable to all implanters and policy makers alike.
PubMed ID
19558289 View in PubMed
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Health risks of electric and magnetic fields caused by high-voltage systems in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212253
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1996 Apr;22(2):85-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
J. Valjus
Author Affiliation
Imatran Voima Oy, Environmental Protection Division, Vantaa, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1996 Apr;22(2):85-93
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - radiation effects
Cardiovascular System - radiation effects
Child
Chromatids - radiation effects
Electric Power Supplies - adverse effects - standards
Electric Wiring - standards
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pacemaker, Artificial
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Safety Management
Abstract
Health risks of power-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMF) in the generation and transmission of electric power were investigated in a program comprising nine separate projects. The central objectives were to assess the practical importance of electric and magnetic field exposure as a health risk, to produce data applicable to field management measures at a major power company, and to support and spur research activities on electric and magnetic fields as environmental agents. Electric and magnetic fields seemed to be weak environmental factors, but the findings were uncertain and controversial as to the health risks except that, electric field strengths (about 1.5 kV.m-1) found even in the vicinity of 110 kV power lines may cause interference with cardiac pacemakers. There is still a need, however, for further basic research focused on the interaction mechanisms of electric and magnetic fields and biological tissue.
PubMed ID
8738885 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.