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[An assessment of epidemic outbreaks of salmonellosis connected with poultry plant production].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225422
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Nov;(11):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
V I Sergevnin
L V Kovalevskaia
R A Mikhaeleva
V I Frizen
V A Petrov
N D Pozdeeva
T V Kovaleva
G A Dobrokhotova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Nov;(11):27-30
Date
Nov-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chickens - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Disease Vectors
Eggs - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Meat-Packing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Poultry Products - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Salmonella enteritidis
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
The causes of the simultaneous rise of salmonellosis morbidity induced by S. enteritidis among the population of three towns in the Perm region were studied. The study revealed the leading role of eggs and chicken meat as factors contributing to the transfer of this infection to the population of different territories, commonly supplied with the products of one poultry plant. The contamination of eggs and chickens with S. enteritidis occurred at the plant due to Salmonella infection of chickens, parallel with the use of nonbalanced mixed fodder, originally intended for feeding swine. Analysis of the epidemic and epizootic processes of Salmonella infection in this epidemic situation made it possible to reliably establish the factors contributing to the transfer of the infective agent and the site of contamination.
PubMed ID
1839812 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis at the New Year celebration of the Copenhagen Medical Association]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75572
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 May 10;161(19):2803-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1999
Author
B J Neimann
L C Balslev
S. Glismann
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Dansk Zoonosecenter, LEKO Levnedsmiddelkontrollen I/S Skovlunde.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 May 10;161(19):2803-6
Date
May-10-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Eggs - microbiology
English Abstract
Gastroenteritis - diagnosis - microbiology
Humans
Salmonella Food Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology
Salmonella Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Abstract
In order to determine the extent and infectious vehicle of an outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 6 at the New Year celebration of the Copenhagen Medical Association on 15 January 1999, a cohort study including 77 guests (90% of the participants) and 11 staff was carried out. There was little variation in the degree of exposure among the guests, meaning that identification of the probable infectious vehicle was not possible here. However, among the staff, intake of minced raw salmon was associated with increased risk of disease. Uncooked eggs were used in the preparation of this dish and since S. enteritidis phage type 6 is in Denmark almost exclusively found among egg-laying hens, these findings led to the conclusion that the outbreak was most likely caused by the use of raw eggs. The importance of notification of suspected foodborne disease and microbiological examination of people thereby exposed is stressed.
PubMed ID
10412319 View in PubMed
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Application of Bayesian techniques to model the burden of human salmonellosis attributable to U.S. food commodities at the point of processing: adaptation of a Danish model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101899
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2011 Apr;8(4):509-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Chuanfa Guo
Robert M Hoekstra
Carl M Schroeder
Sara Monteiro Pires
Kanyin Liane Ong
Emma Hartnett
Alecia Naugle
Jane Harman
Patricia Bennett
Paul Cieslak
Elaine Scallan
Bonnie Rose
Kristin G Holt
Bonnie Kissler
Evelyne Mbandi
Reza Roodsari
Frederick J Angulo
Dana Cole
Author Affiliation
Food Safety and Inspection Service, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2011 Apr;8(4):509-16
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Cattle
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Eggs - microbiology
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Models, Biological
Population Surveillance
Poultry
Prevalence
Public Health Informatics - methods
Risk Management - methods
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Sus scrofa
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Mathematical models that estimate the proportion of foodborne illnesses attributable to food commodities at specific points in the food chain may be useful to risk managers and policy makers to formulate public health goals, prioritize interventions, and document the effectiveness of mitigations aimed at reducing illness. Using human surveillance data on laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Salmonella testing data from U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service's regulatory programs, we developed a point-of-processing foodborne illness attribution model by adapting the Hald Salmonella Bayesian source attribution model. Key model outputs include estimates of the relative proportions of domestically acquired sporadic human Salmonella infections resulting from contamination of raw meat, poultry, and egg products processed in the United States from 1998 through 2003. The current model estimates the relative contribution of chicken (48%), ground beef (28%), turkey (17%), egg products (6%), intact beef (1%), and pork (
PubMed ID
21235394 View in PubMed
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The attribution of human infections with antimicrobial resistant Salmonella bacteria in Denmark to sources of animal origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161193
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2007;4(3):313-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Tine Hald
Danilo M A Lo Fo Wong
Frank M Aarestrup
Author Affiliation
National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. tih@food.dtu.dk
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2007;4(3):313-26
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Colony Count, Microbial
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Eggs - microbiology
Food contamination - analysis
Food Microbiology
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Salmonella - drug effects
Salmonella Food Poisoning - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Salmonella enterica
Sentinel Surveillance
Travel
Abstract
Based on the Danish Salmonella surveillance in 2000-2001, we developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis caused by antimicrobial resistant bacteria. Domestic food products accounted for 53.1% of all cases, mainly caused by table eggs (37.6%). A large proportion (19%) of cases were travel related, while 18% could not be associated with any source. Imported food products accounted for 9.5% of all cases; the most important source being imported chicken. Multidrug and quinolone resistance was rarely found in cases acquired from Danish food, but was common in cases related to imported products (49.7% and 35.6% of attributable cases) and travelling (26.5% and 38.3% of attributable cases). For most serovars, the quinolone-resistant isolates were found to be associated with relatively more human infections than that of resistant isolates, which in turn was higher than that of susceptible isolates. This may be due to quinolone-resistant isolates having a higher ability to survive food processing and/or cause disease. This study showed domestic food to be the most important source of Salmonella infections in Denmark, but infections with multidrug- and quinolone-resistant isolates were more commonly caused by imported food products and travelling, emphasizing the need for a global perspective on food safety and antimicrobial usage.
PubMed ID
17883315 View in PubMed
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A Bayesian approach to quantify the contribution of animal-food sources to human salmonellosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75499
Source
Risk Anal. 2004 Feb;24(1):255-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Tine Hald
David Vose
Henrik C Wegener
Timour Koupeev
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute of Food and Veterinary Research, Mørkhøj Bygade, Søberg, Denmark. tih@dfvf.dk
Source
Risk Anal. 2004 Feb;24(1):255-69
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bayes Theorem
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Eggs - microbiology
Food Microbiology
Humans
Markov Chains
Meat - microbiology
Models, Biological
Monte Carlo Method
Risk assessment
Salmonella - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology
Sus scrofa
Abstract
Based on the data from the integrated Danish Salmonella surveillance in 1999, we developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each of the major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis. The model was set up to calculate the number of domestic and sporadic cases caused by different Salmonella sero and phage types as a function of the prevalence of these Salmonella types in the animal-food sources and the amount of food source consumed. A multiparameter prior accounting for the presumed but unknown differences between serotypes and food sources with respect to causing human salmonellosis was also included. The joint posterior distribution was estimated by fitting the model to the reported number of domestic and sporadic cases per Salmonella type in a Bayesian framework using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. The number of domestic and sporadic cases was obtained by subtracting the estimated number of travel- and outbreak-associated cases from the total number of reported cases, i.e., the observed data. The most important food sources were found to be table eggs and domestically produced pork comprising 47.1% (95% credibility interval, CI: 43.3-50.8%) and 9% (95% CI: 7.8-10.4%) of the cases, respectively. Taken together, imported foods were estimated to account for 11.8% (95% CI: 5.0-19.0%) of the cases. Other food sources considered had only a minor impact, whereas 25% of the cases could not be associated with any source. This approach of quantifying the contribution of the various sources to human salmonellosis has proved to be a valuable tool in risk management in Denmark and provides an example of how to integrate quantitative risk assessment and zoonotic disease surveillance.
PubMed ID
15028016 View in PubMed
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Disease risks from foods, England and Wales, 1996-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175809
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Mar;11(3):365-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Goutam K Adak
Sallyanne M Meakins
Hopi Yip
Benjamin A Lopman
Sarah J O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Environmental and Enteric Diseases Department, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections, London NW9 5EQ, UK. bod.adak@hpa.org.uk
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Mar;11(3):365-72
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology
Cattle
Disease Outbreaks
Eggs - microbiology
England - epidemiology
Fishes
Food Microbiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Milk - microbiology
Parasitic Diseases - epidemiology
Poultry
Risk factors
Swine
Vegetables - microbiology
Virus Diseases - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Data from population-based studies and national surveillance systems were collated and analyzed to estimate the impact of disease and risks associated with eating different foods in England and Wales. From 1996 to 2000, an estimated 1,724,315 cases of indigenous foodborne disease per year resulted in 21,997 hospitalizations and 687 deaths. The greatest impact on the healthcare sector arose from foodborne Campylobacter infection (160,788 primary care visits and 15,918 hospitalizations), while salmonellosis caused the most deaths (209). The most important cause of indigenous foodborne disease was contaminated chicken (398,420 cases, risk [cases/million servings] = 111; case-fatality rate [deaths/100,000 cases] = 35, deaths = 141). Red meat (beef, lamb, and pork) contributed heavily to deaths, despite lower levels of risk (287,485 cases, risk = 24, case-fatality rate = 57, deaths = 164). Reducing the impact of indigenous foodborne disease is mainly dependent on controlling the contamination of chicken.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15757549 View in PubMed
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The effects, costs and benefits of Salmonella control in the Danish table-egg sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156047
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Jun;137(6):828-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
H. Korsgaard
M. Madsen
N C Feld
J. Mygind
T. Hald
Author Affiliation
National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg, Denmark. hkor@food.dtu.dk
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Jun;137(6):828-36
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chickens
Communicable Disease Control - economics - methods
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Eggs - microbiology
Humans
Models, Biological
Models, Statistical
Poultry Diseases - economics - prevention & control
Public Health - economics
Salmonella Infections - economics - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
A public plan for eradicating Salmonella in Danish table-egg production was implemented in 1996. During 2002, the poultry industry took over the responsibility of the programme. The proportion of infected layer flocks was reduced from 13.4% in 1998 to 0.4% in 2006. The public-health impact of the plan has been quite marked. In 1997, 55-65% of the 5015 cases of human salmonellosis were estimated to be associated with eggs. In 2006, these figures were reduced to 1658 and 5-7%, respectively. Based on an assessment of the number of human cases attributable to table eggs, we used probabilistic modelling to estimate the avoided societal costs (health care and lost labour), and compared these with the public costs of control. The probable avoided societal costs during 1998-2002 were estimated to be 23.3 million euros (95% CI 16.3-34.9), and the results showed a continuous decreasing cost-benefit ratio reaching well below 1 in 2002. Further reductions in the primary production based on effective surveillance and control are required to ensure continued success.
PubMed ID
18644168 View in PubMed
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Egg consumption patterns and Salmonella risk in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177328
Source
J Food Prot. 2004 Nov;67(11):2416-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
S. Lievonen
A S Havulinna
R. Maiala
Author Affiliation
Department of Risk Assessment, National Veterinary and Food Research Institute, P.O. Box 45, 00581 Helsinki, Finland. satu.lievonen@eela.fi
Source
J Food Prot. 2004 Nov;67(11):2416-23
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cooking - methods
Data Collection - methods
Eggs - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Handling - methods
Humans
Hygiene
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Abstract
To estimate the consumer risk of contracting Salmonella infection via shell eggs and to evaluate the effect of possible preventative measures, quantitative microbiological risk assessment is being developed in Finland. As a part of the risk assessment, a survey of 918 respondents was conducted to study how households purchase, store, handle, and use eggs. In addition, suitability of the Internet as a survey method was compared with a postal survey. Shell eggs were usually purchased once every 2 weeks (41% of all the respondents). Ninety-one percent of the respondents bought eggs in groceries and 93% stored eggs at chilled temperatures. The majority of the respondents (80%) only had eggs in their home for which the best-before date had not expired. Only 34% of the respondents said that they always washed their hands after breaking eggs. Consumption of well-cooked eggs accounted for 84%, consumption of soft-boiled eggs for 12%, and consumption of raw eggs for 4% of the total amount of eggs consumed. The elderly used eggs more frequently than the whole population, but the consumption of raw egg dishes decreased with age. The Internet survey was a rapid method for transmitting information, but its response rate was low (9%), and it did not appear to be a suitable tool for data collection in a general population. The results indicate that although the majority of the respondents had safe egg-handling practices, a substantial minority of the consumers had risk-prone behavior.
PubMed ID
15553622 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiological data on salmonellosis due to Salmonella enteritidis in some areas of the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211507
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1996 Jul-Aug;(4):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
L B Khazenson
Zh V Poplavskaia
E I Kariagina
L A Kaftyreva
E V Voitenkova
M Iu Nesterova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1996 Jul-Aug;(4):53-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chickens - microbiology
Eggs - microbiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Morbidity - trends
Poultry Products - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
A rise in morbidity caused by S. enteritidis at individual territories of the Russian Federation in the second half of 1980s was due to the consumption of insufficiently heated infected chicken eggs and the nonobservance of sanitary and hygienic rules in the preparation of food from chicken meat. The spread of S. enteritidis in the Russian Federation occurred mainly at the territories supplied with incubator eggs from the same poultry-breeding enterprise. S. enteritidis strains isolated from infected patients, chicken eggs, follicles and chicken-meat products belonged to biovar Jena (as a rule, to phagovar 1), had plasmid with a mol. wt. of 38 MD, produced no aerobactin, and their overwhelming majority was resistant to antibiotics.
PubMed ID
9027177 View in PubMed
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Frozen chicken nuggets and strips and eggs are leading risk factors for Salmonella Heidelberg infections in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172759
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Oct;133(5):809-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
A. Currie
L. MacDougall
J. Aramini
C. Gaulin
R. Ahmed
S. Isaacs
Author Affiliation
Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Public Health Agency of Canada (formerly Health Canada), Guelph, Ontario, Canada. andrea_currie@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2005 Oct;133(5):809-16
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chickens - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Eggs - microbiology
Female
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Salmonella - classification - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A case-control study was conducted from 1 January to 31 May 2003 to identify risk factors for S . Heidelberg infection in Canada. Controls were pair-matched by age group and telephone exchange to 95 cases. Exposures in the 7 days before illness/interview were assessed using multivariate conditional logistic regression. Consumption of home-prepared chicken nuggets and/or strips [matched odds ratio (mOR) 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.8], and undercooked eggs (mOR 7.5, 95% CI 1.5-75.5) increased the risk of illness. Exposure to a farm setting lowered the risk (mOR 0.22, 95% CI 0.03-1.00). The population-attributable fraction associated with chicken nuggets/strips was 34% and with undercooked eggs was 16%. One-third of study participants did not perceive, handle or prepare chicken nuggets and strips as high-risk products, although the majority of the products on the Canadian market are raw. These findings have prompted changes in product-labelling policy and consumer education.
PubMed ID
16181499 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.