Skip header and navigation

Refine By

309 records – page 1 of 31.

[7 years' experience with physical training in infarct]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55950
Source
Lakartidningen. 1979 Dec 12;76(50):4617-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1979

A 10-week randomized trial comparing eccentric vs. concentric hamstring strength training in well-trained soccer players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49656
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Roald Mjølsnes
Arni Arnason
Tor Østhagen
Truls Raastad
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Humans
Knee - physiology
Male
Muscles - physiology
Physical Education and Training - methods
Physical Fitness
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soccer
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the effects of a 10-week training program with two different exercises -- traditional hamstring curl (HC) and Nordic hamstrings (NH), a partner exercise focusing the eccentric phase -- on muscle strength among male soccer players. METHODS: Subjects were 21 well-trained players who were randomized to NH training (n = 11) or HC training (n = 10). The programs were similar, with a gradual increase in the number of repetitions from two sets of six reps to three sets of eight to 12 reps over 4 weeks, and then increasing load during the final 6 weeks of training. Strength was measured as maximal torque on a Cybex dynamometer before and after the training period. RESULTS: In the NH group, there was an 11% increase in eccentric hamstring torque measured at 60 degrees s(-1), as well as a 7% increase in isometric hamstring strength at 90 degrees, 60 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion. Since there was no effect on concentric quadriceps strength, there was a significant increase in the hamstrings:quadriceps ratio from 0.89 +/- 0.12 to 0.98 +/- 0.17 (11%) in the NH group. No changes were observed in the HC group. CONCLUSION: NH training for 10 weeks more effectively develops maximal eccentric hamstring strength in well-trained soccer players than a comparable program based on traditional HC.
PubMed ID
15387805 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Action of a daily physical education lesson on changes in the cerebral circulation of schoolchildren under the effect of a daily and weekly study load].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254124
Source
Gig Sanit. 1973 Dec;38(12):62-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1973

Action Schools! BC: a socioecological approach to modifying chronic disease risk factors in elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170244
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Patti-Jean Naylor
Heather M Macdonald
Katharine E Reed
Heather A McKay
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, University of Victoria, Box 3015, STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2P1. pjnaylor@uvic.ca
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Diet
Health Education - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Physical Education and Training - organization & administration - standards
Risk factors
Schools - organization & administration - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Childhood physical inactivity and obesity are serious public health threats. Socioecological approaches to addressing these threats have been proposed. The school is a critical environment for promoting children's health and provides the opportunity to explore the impact of a socioecological approach.
Thirty percent of children in British Columbia, Canada, are overweight or obese, and 50% of youths are not physically active enough to yield health benefits.
Action Schools! BC, a socioecological model, was developed to create 1) an elementary school environment where students are provided with more opportunities to make healthy choices and 2) a supportive community and provincial environment to facilitate change at the school and individual levels.
The environment in British Columbia for school- and provincial-level action on health behaviors improved. Focus group and project tracking results indicated that the Action Schools! BC model enhanced the conceptual use of knowledge and was an influencing factor. Political will and public interest were also cited as influential factors.
The Action Schools! BC model required substantial and demanding changes in the approach of the researchers, policy makers, and support team toward health promotion. Despite challenges, Action Schools! BC provides a good example of how to enhance knowledge exchange and multilevel intersectoral action in chronic disease prevention.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1429-3311192647
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2001 Aug;21(2):101-911457629
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Mar;26(3):425-3611896500
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Jan;47(1):6-221539925
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Feb;56(3):449-6412570966
Cites: Health Educ Q. 1988 Winter;15(4):351-773068205
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Aug;23(2 Suppl):15-2512133734
PubMed ID
16539801 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active Smarter Kids (ASK): Rationale and design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of daily physical activity on children's academic performance and risk factors for non-communicable diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269990
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir K Resaland
Vegard Fusche Moe
Eivind Aadland
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Øyvind Glosvik
John R Andersen
Olav M Kvalheim
Heather A McKay
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:709
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Child
Cluster analysis
Exercise - psychology
Female
Health Promotion - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Physical Education and Training
Primary Prevention
Quality of Life
Risk factors
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Evidence is emerging from school-based studies that physical activity might favorably affect children's academic performance. However, there is a need for high-quality studies to support this. Therefore, the main objective of the Active Smarter Kids (ASK) study is to investigate the effect of daily physical activity on children's academic performance. Because of the complexity of the relation between physical activity and academic performance it is important to identify mediating and moderating variables such as cognitive function, fitness, adiposity, motor skills and quality of life (QoL). Further, there are global concerns regarding the high prevalence of lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The best means to address this challenge could be through primary prevention. Physical activity is known to play a key role in preventing a host of NCDs. Therefore, we investigated as a secondary objective the effect of the intervention on risk factors related to NCDs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the ASK study, the ASK intervention as well as the scope and details of the methods we adopted to evaluate the effect of the ASK intervention on 5 (th) grade children.
The ASK study is a cluster randomized controlled trial that includes 1145 fifth graders (aged 10 years) from 57 schools (28 intervention schools; 29 control schools) in Sogn and Fjordane County, Norway. This represents 95.3 % of total possible recruitment. Children in all 57 participating schools took part in a curriculum-prescribed physical activity intervention (90 min/week of physical education (PE) and 45 min/week physical activity, in total; 135 min/week). In addition, children from intervention schools also participated in the ASK intervention model (165 min/week), i.e. a total of 300 min/week of physical activity/PE. The ASK study was implemented over 7 months, from November 2014 to June 2015. We assessed academic performance in reading, numeracy and English using Norwegian National tests delivered by The Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training. We assessed physical activity objectively at baseline, midpoint and at the end of the intervention. All other variables were measured at baseline and post-intervention. In addition, we used qualitative methodologies to obtain an in-depth understanding of children's embodied experiences and pedagogical processes taking place during the intervention.
If successful, ASK could provide strong evidence of a relation between physical activity and academic performance that could potentially inform the process of learning in elementary schools. Schools might also be identified as effective settings for large scale public health initiatives for the prevention of NCDs.
Clinicaltrials.gov ID nr: NCT02132494 . Date of registration, 6(th) of May, 2014.
Notes
Cites: Cogn Psychol. 2000 Aug;41(1):49-10010945922
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2001 Aug;93(1):275-8011693695
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Aug;35(8):1447-5412900703
Cites: Health Educ Q. 1988 Winter;15(4):351-773068205
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Sep 11;319(7211):670-410480822
Cites: J Chromatogr A. 2006 Feb 3;1104(1-2):291-816343517
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Sep 12;114(11):1214-2416908770
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2007 May;21(5):465-7017613568
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2007 Oct;16(8):1347-5617668292
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2008 Jun;41(3-4):327-5018322790
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 May 29;358(22):2366-7718509122
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Dec;48(4):434-718997644
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2009 Jan;43(1):10-318971250
Cites: Milbank Q. 2009 Mar;87(1):71-10019298416
Cites: Analyst. 2009 Sep;134(9):1781-519684899
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Oct;49(4):336-4119665037
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2008 Dec;26(14):1557-6518949660
Cites: BMJ. 2010;340:c78520179126
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2010 Aug;33(4):355-6820645423
Cites: Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2010;19(3):350-720805079
Cites: Res Dev Disabil. 2011 Mar-Apr;32(2):674-8021146955
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 May;48(5):573-8121067750
Cites: Res Dev Disabil. 2011 Jul-Aug;32(4):1361-921330102
Cites: Prev Med. 2011 Jun;52 Suppl 1:S21-821281669
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jul;43(7):1360-821131873
Cites: Int J Pharm. 2011 Sep 30;417(1-2):280-9021335075
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012 Jan;166(1):49-5522213750
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 Feb;54(2):160-522224668
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Jul 21;380(9838):219-2922818936
Cites: BMJ. 2012;345:e566122951546
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2224-6023245609
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013;13:30723565969
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:9123866826
Cites: Anal Chem. 2014 Jan 7;86(1):543-5024319989
Cites: PLoS One. 2014;9(10):e11049225330388
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2015 Feb;49(4):210-825312876
PubMed ID
26215478 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute impact of submaximal resistance exercise on immunological and hormonal parameters in young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9539
Source
J Sports Sci. 2003 Dec;21(12):1001-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Alfons Ramel
Karl-Heinz Wagner
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland, PO Box Nyi Gardur, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. ramel@hi.is
Source
J Sports Sci. 2003 Dec;21(12):1001-8
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Comparative Study
Hematocrit
Humans
Hydrocortisone - blood
Killer Cells, Natural - physiology
Leukocyte Count
Lymphocyte Count
Male
Monocytes - physiology
Neutrophils - physiology
Norepinephrine - blood
Physical Education and Training - methods
Reference Values
T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer - physiology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
In this study, we examined the acute effects of submaximal resistance exercise on immunological and hormonal parameters in 7 resistance-trained and 10 non-resistance-trained males. The participants, who were aged 29.5 +/- 7.1 years (mean +/- s), performed submaximal resistance exercise at 75% of their one-repetition maximum. Blood samples were taken before, during, immediately after, and 30, 60 and 120 min after exercise and analysed for leukocyte subpopulations and stress hormones. Total leukocytes, neutrophils and monocytes increased during exercise, reaching their maximum 2 h after exercise. Lymphocytes increased during exercise, T-helper cells returned to resting values after exercise, and natural killer cells and T-suppressor cells decreased below resting values. The CD4/CD8 ratio decreased during exercise but increased during recovery. The resistance-trained participants tended to have lower T-helper cell counts before, during and immediately after exercise and a lower CD4/CD8 ratio during recovery than the non-resistance-trained participants. Plasma cortisol correlated positively with leukocytes during exercise (r = 0.572, P
PubMed ID
14748457 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A.G.A.R.D. course. The physiology of cold weather survival. Spatind (Norway) April 6-14, 1973].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254962
Source
Riv Med Aeronaut Spaz. 1973 Jan-Jun;36(1):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Source
Riv Med Aeronaut Spaz. 1973 Jan-Jun;36(1):151-6
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aerospace Medicine
Cold Temperature
Humans
Norway
Physical Education and Training
PubMed ID
4792589 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaska Mental Health Trust Workforce Development Initiative : An Overview of Workforce Related Data & Strategies to Address the Gaps.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301416
Source
The Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority Steering Committee. 48 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2006]
  1 document  
Author
Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mental Health Program
Source
The Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority Steering Committee. 48 pages.
Date
[2006]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
442982
Keywords
Alaska
Mental health
Workforce trends
Education and training
Abstract
The Mental Health Trust Authority, in partnership with the State Division of Behavioral Health, and the University of Alaska System brought stakeholders together to strategically discuss and examine the workforce trends and demands in Alaska, including recruitment, retention, education, training, and career opportunities. The goal of this project is to expand upon the current workforce efforts and to increase communication between systems and initiatives to foster a more coordinated strategy that maximizes resources and decreases duplication.
Documents

Workforce-Development-Initiative.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
Less detail

[Alcoholism as a risk factor for coronary disease and the possibilities of its prevention through physical training]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12692
Source
Ter Arkh. 1986;58(5):60-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
A Z Zapesochnyi
Source
Ter Arkh. 1986;58(5):60-2
Date
1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - complications
Coronary Disease - etiology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Physical Education and Training
Risk
Sports
Ukraine
Work
Abstract
Mass examination in organized populations at industrial enterprises made it possible to bring to light a statistically significant different effect of the level of productive labor and sport activity on the prevalence of frequent alcohol consumption as one of CHD risk factors. A sufficient degree of regular physical training made a considerable effect on a decrease in CHD prevalence.
PubMed ID
3738795 View in PubMed
Less detail

An active school model to promote physical activity in elementary schools: action schools! BC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158817
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2008 May;42(5):338-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
P-J Naylor
H M Macdonald
D E R Warburton
K E Reed
H A McKay
Author Affiliation
School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2008 May;42(5):338-43
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Physical Education and Training - methods
Physical Fitness - physiology
Schools
Socioeconomic Factors
Walking - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess the impact of an active school model on children's physical activity (PA).
16-month cluster randomised controlled trial.
10 elementary schools in Greater Vancouver, BC.
515 children aged 9-11 years.
Action Schools! BC (AS! BC) is an active school model that provided schools with training and resources to increase children's PA. Schools implemented AS! BC with support from either external liaisons (liaison schools, LS; four schools) or internal champions (champion schools, CS; three schools). Outcomes were compared with usual practice (UP) schools (three schools).
PA was measured four times during the study using pedometers (step count, steps/day).
Boys in the LS group took 1175 more steps per day, on average, than boys in the UP group (95% CI: 97 to 2253). Boys in the CS group also tended to have a higher step count than boys in the UP group (+804 steps/day; 95% CI: -341 to 1949). There was no difference in girls' step counts across groups.
The positive effect of the AS! BC model on boys' PA is important in light of the current global trend of decreased PA.
PubMed ID
18272538 View in PubMed
Less detail

309 records – page 1 of 31.