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188 records – page 1 of 19.

25-year trends and socio-demographic differences in response rates: Finnish adult health behaviour survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168616
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(6):409-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hanna Tolonen
Satu Helakorpi
Kirsi Talala
Ville Helasoja
Tuija Martelin
Ritva Prättälä
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. hanna.tolonen@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(6):409-15
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Education - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - ethnology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
When estimating population level changes in health indicators, the declining response rate, especially if also the characteristics of non-respondents are changing may bias the outcome. There is evidence that survey response rates are declining in many countries. It is also known that respondents and non-respondents differ in their socio-economic and demographic status as well as in their health and health behaviours. There is no information about the changes in the differences between respondents and non-respondents over time. Our purpose was to investigate the changes over time in the differences between respondents and non-respondents in respect to their sex, age, marital status and educational level. The data from the Finnish Adult Health Behaviour Survey (1978-2002) was used. The response rate declined over the past 25 years for both men and women in all age groups. The decline was faster among men than women, and also faster in younger age groups than older age groups. There is a marked difference in the response rate between married and non-married persons but it did not change over time. Also the response rate between different educational levels differed for both men and women, and this difference increased over the years. The declining response rate and at the same time occurring change in the non-respondent characteristics will decrease the representativeness of the results, limit the comparability of the results with other surveys, increase the bias of the trend estimates and limit the comparability of the results between population groups.
PubMed ID
16804763 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the level of knowledge of schoolchildren about HIV infection and AIDS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202606
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Jan-Feb;(1):116-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E O Kopnina
E E Al'tova
N N Zaitseva
N I Ivanova
E M Matveeva
O I Myzina
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Jan-Feb;(1):116-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
Adolescent
Child
HIV Infections - prevention & control
HIV-1
Health Education - statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Russia
Abstract
The comparative study of the level knowledge on HIV infection and AIDS among school children was carried out. The prophylactic work among school children yielded positive results, which was statistically confirmed by the analysis of answers to questionnaires, distributed before and after lectures.
PubMed ID
10096235 View in PubMed
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[Activities and staffing in intensive care units in Norway--still need of better registration].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195091
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):694-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2001
Author
A. Fredriksen
Author Affiliation
Helsepolitisk avdeling Den norske laegeforening Postboks 1152 Sentrum 0107 Oslo. audun.fredriksen@legeforeningen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):694-7
Date
Feb-28-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - utilization
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Standards in Intensive Care Medicine were approved by the Board of the Norwegian Medical Association in 1997. Their purpose is to clarify issues of responsibility, accountability and management in intensive care units. It also gives recommendations on management, staffing, education and resources.
In order to obtain a reference point for any future assessment of the impact of the Standards document, a survey was carried out, addressing work load, medical staff, and questions of accountability, responsibility and cooperation.
16 hospitals responded (76%). The results seem to indicate that medical staff in relation to work load is smaller than recommended. It also seems that junior doctors only to a small extent are present in the intensive care units during ordinary working hours, and consequently have little opportunity to learn from working with experienced colleagues. However, both conclusions, especially the first one, are not entirely reliable, as close examination of the answers indicate that important concepts concerning the description of work load and staffing are poorly defined, and that the monitoring of work load is insufficient.
It is concluded that staffing and work load in intensive care units are still insufficiently defined and monitored. The training environment for specialists is not optimal.
PubMed ID
11293351 View in PubMed
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Administrators of volunteer services: their needs for training and research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221883
Source
Nonprofit Manag Leadersh. 1992;2(3):271-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
J L Brudney
Author Affiliation
University of Georgia.
Source
Nonprofit Manag Leadersh. 1992;2(3):271-82
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - education - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Education, Continuing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Organizations, Nonprofit - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Research
United States
Volunteers - organization & administration
Abstract
Despite the importance of volunteer administrators to nonprofit and many government organizations, little systematic research has been focused on these officials. Using a large national survey of volunteer practitioners conducted in 1989-1990, this article examines empirically several hypotheses concerning organizational support to meet administrator needs for continuing education. Using the survey responses, the article also elaborates the subjects recommended by the administrators for treatment in a basic seminar in volunteer management, in an advanced seminar, and in further research.
PubMed ID
10117915 View in PubMed
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Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Oct;78(5):352-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
K. Edgardh
Author Affiliation
Department of Venhälsan, Karolinska Institute, Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.edgardh@ulleval.no
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2002 Oct;78(5):352-6
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child Abuse, Sexual - statistics & numerical data
Contraception - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex
Sex Education - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In Sweden, society's attitudes towards teenage sexual relationships are liberal, and sexual and reproductive health issues are given high priority. Family and sex education has been taught in schools since the 1950s. The age of sexual consent is 15 years. Since 1975, abortion has been free on demand. Contraceptive counselling is free, easily available at family planning and youth health clinics. Screening for genital chlamydial infection is performed at these clinics, thus providing a "one stop shop" service. Condoms and oral contraception are available at low cost, emergency contraception is sold over the counter. Teenage childbearing is uncommon. However, sexual and reproductive health problems are on the increase among young people. During the 1990s, a period of economic stagnation in Sweden, schools have suffered budget cut backs. Sex education is taught less. Social segregation, school non-attendance, smoking, and drug use have increased. Teenage abortion rates have gone up, from 17/1000 in 1995 to 22.5/1000 in 2001. Genital chlamydial infections have increased from 14,000 cases in 1994 to 22,263 cases in 2001, 60% occurring among young people, and with the steepest increase among teenagers. Thus, a question of major concern is whether and how adolescent sexual behaviour has shifted towards more risky practices during the late 1990s.
PubMed ID
12407239 View in PubMed
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Airway management by US and Canadian emergency medicine residents: a multicenter analysis of more than 6,000 endotracheal intubation attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172707
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2005 Oct;46(4):328-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Mark J Sagarin
Erik D Barton
Yi-Mei Chng
Ron M Walls
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2005 Oct;46(4):328-36
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Obstruction - therapy
Canada
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Cricoid Cartilage - surgery
Educational Status
Emergency Medicine - education - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Intubation, Intratracheal - methods - statistics & numerical data
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Thyroid Cartilage - surgery
United States
Abstract
We determine success rates of endotracheal intubation performed in emergency departments (EDs) by North American emergency medicine residents.
During 58 months, physicians performing intubations at 31 university-affiliated EDs in 3 nations completed a data form that was entered into the National Emergency Airway Registry 2 database. Included were all patients undergoing endotracheal intubation in the ED. The data form included patients' age, sex, weight, indication for intubation, technique of airway management, names and dosages of all medications used to facilitate intubation, level of training and specialty of the intubator, number of attempts, success or failure, and adverse events. We queried this prospectively gathered, observational data to analyze intubations done by US and Canadian emergency medicine residents.
Enrollment was incomplete (eg, 85% at the main study center), so the study sample did not include all consecutive patients. Emergency medicine residents performed 77% (5768/7498; 95% confidence interval [CI] 76% to 78%) of all initial intubation attempts in the United States and Canada. The first intubator was successful in 90% (5,193/5,757; 95% CI 89% to 91%) of cases, including 83% (4,775/5,757; 95% CI 82% to 84%) on the first attempt. Success rates on the first attempt were as follows: postgraduate year 1 = 72% (498/692; 95% CI 68% to 75%), postgraduate year 2 = 82% (2,081/2,544; 95% CI 80% to 83%), postgraduate year 3 = 88% (1,963/2,238; 95% CI 86% to 89%), postgraduate year 4+ = 82% (233/283; 95% CI 77% to 87%), and attending physician = 89% (689/772; 95% CI 87% to 91%). Success rates by the first intubator were as follows: postgraduate year 1 = 80% (553/692; 95% CI 77% to 83%), postgraduate year 2 = 89% (2,272/2,544; 95% CI 88% to 90%), postgraduate year 3 = 94% (2,105/2,238; 95% CI 93% to 95%), postgraduate year 4+ = 93% (263/283; 95% CI 89% to 96%), and attending physician = 98% (755/772; 95% CI 96% to 99%). Rapid sequence intubation technique was used in 78% (4,513/5,768; 95% CI 77% to 79%) of initial attempts: it resulted in 85% (3,843/4,513; 95% CI 84% to 86%) success on the first attempt and 91% (4,117/4,513; 95% CI 90% to 92%) success by the first intubator. The overall rate of cricothyrotomy for all emergency resident intubations was 0.9% (50/5,757; 95% CI 0.6% to 1.1%). When an initial intubator failed, 40% (385/954; 95% CI 37% to 44%) of rescue attempts were performed by emergency medicine residents. Among emergency medicine residents, success on the first rescue attempt was 80% (297/371; 95% CI 76% to 84%), and success by the first rescue intubator was 88% (328/371; 95% CI 85% to 91%).
Success of initial intubation attempts increased over the first 3 years of residency. This large multicenter study demonstrates the success of airway management by emergency medicine residents in North America. Using rapid-sequence intubation predominantly, emergency medicine residents achieved high levels of success.
PubMed ID
16187466 View in PubMed
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188 records – page 1 of 19.