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914 records – page 1 of 92.

[100,000 Goteburgers will learn how to save lives. Interview by Jan Thomasson.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55687
Source
Vardfacket. 1985 Mar 7;9(5):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-1985
Author
M. Blohm
Source
Vardfacket. 1985 Mar 7;9(5):14-6
Date
Mar-7-1985
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Education - organization & administration
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Resuscitation - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
3849220 View in PubMed
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The 1996 Helene Hudson Memorial Lecture. Work redesign and re-engineering: a challenge for professional nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206735
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1997 Nov;7(4):198-201, 204-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
L. Vincent
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1997 Nov;7(4):198-201, 204-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Hospital Restructuring - organization & administration
Humans
Oncology Nursing - education - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Abstract
Work redesign and re-engineering have become the buzzwords of the 1990s as all sectors of the health care arena struggle to meet the demands of patient care while coping with increasing fiscal constraint. Redesign and re-engineering are terms that describe a wide range of strategies in health care and radically different models of care delivery. These new approaches to care are shifting the way we view care delivery and how it is structured. This paper describes the principles of redesign and re-engineering, common applications in health care organizations, outcomes and evaluation. Multiskilling and use of genetic health care workers are addressed. The potential impact on the practice of oncology nurses is explored as well as strategies to meet the challenges of today's health care environment.
PubMed ID
9450417 View in PubMed
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The 2004 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181499
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Kelly B Zarnke
Norman R C Campbell
Ross D Feldman
Donald W McKay
Finlay A McAlister
Nadia Khan
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Martin G Myers
Peter Bolli
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Mitchell Levine
Raj Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk and identifiable causes for adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, defining overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of concomitant vascular risk factors, including laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment for modifiable causes of hypertension. Home and ambulatory blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
The identification of persons at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the quantification of overall cardiovascular risk; and the identification of persons with potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
Medline searches were conducted from November 2001, one year before the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension, to October 2003. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of persons at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and persons with identifiable and potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
The identification of persons at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle maneuvers and introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. The identification of specific causes of hypertension may permit the use of cause-specific interventions. For certain subgroups of patients and specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for diagnosis of hypertension, and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Only the recommendations that achieved high levels of consensus are reported. These guidelines will be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968141 View in PubMed
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[Abortion rate among students are increasing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170849
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(21):2253-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Elise Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Tampereen yliopiston lääketieteen laitos. elise.kosunen@uta.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(21):2253-4
Date
2005
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Contraception - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Sex Education - organization & administration
Notes
Comment In: Duodecim. 2006;122(1):104; author reply 10416509197
PubMed ID
16457103 View in PubMed
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Achieving therapeutic clarity in assisted personal body care: professional challenges in interactions with severely ill COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155622
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kirsten Lomborg
Marit Kirkevold
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. kl@nursingscience.au.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Baths - nursing - psychology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Denmark
Dyspnea - etiology
Helping Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Negotiating - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This paper aims to present a theoretical account of professional nursing challenges involved in providing care to patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study objectives are patients' and nurses' expectations, goals and approaches to assisted personal body care.
The provision of help with body care may have therapeutic qualities but there is only limited knowledge about the particularities and variations in specific groups of patients and the nurse-patient interactions required to facilitate patient functioning and well-being. For patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathlessness represents a particular challenge in the performance of body care sessions.
We investigated nurse-patient interactions during assisted personal body care, using grounded theory with a symbolic interaction perspective and a constant comparative method.
Twelve cases of nurse-patient interactions were analysed. Data were based on participant observation, individual interviews with patients and nurses and a standardized questionnaire on patients' breathlessness.
Nurses and patients seemed to put effort into the interaction and wanted to find an appropriate way of conducting the body care session according to the patients' specific needs. Achieving therapeutic clarity in nurse-patient interactions appeared to be an important concern, mainly depending on interactions characterized by: (i) reaching a common understanding of the patient's current conditions and stage of illness trajectory, (ii) negotiating a common scope and structuring body care sessions and (iii) clarifying roles.
It cannot be taken for granted that therapeutic qualities are achieved when nurses provide assistance with body care. If body care should have healing strength, the actual body care activities and the achievement of therapeutic clarity in nurses' interaction with patients' appear to be crucial.
The paper proposes that patients' integrity and comfort in the body care session should be given first priority and raises attention to details that nurses should take into account when assisting severely ill patients.
PubMed ID
18710375 View in PubMed
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Action Schools! BC: a socioecological approach to modifying chronic disease risk factors in elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170244
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Patti-Jean Naylor
Heather M Macdonald
Katharine E Reed
Heather A McKay
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, University of Victoria, Box 3015, STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2P1. pjnaylor@uvic.ca
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Diet
Health Education - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Physical Education and Training - organization & administration - standards
Risk factors
Schools - organization & administration - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Childhood physical inactivity and obesity are serious public health threats. Socioecological approaches to addressing these threats have been proposed. The school is a critical environment for promoting children's health and provides the opportunity to explore the impact of a socioecological approach.
Thirty percent of children in British Columbia, Canada, are overweight or obese, and 50% of youths are not physically active enough to yield health benefits.
Action Schools! BC, a socioecological model, was developed to create 1) an elementary school environment where students are provided with more opportunities to make healthy choices and 2) a supportive community and provincial environment to facilitate change at the school and individual levels.
The environment in British Columbia for school- and provincial-level action on health behaviors improved. Focus group and project tracking results indicated that the Action Schools! BC model enhanced the conceptual use of knowledge and was an influencing factor. Political will and public interest were also cited as influential factors.
The Action Schools! BC model required substantial and demanding changes in the approach of the researchers, policy makers, and support team toward health promotion. Despite challenges, Action Schools! BC provides a good example of how to enhance knowledge exchange and multilevel intersectoral action in chronic disease prevention.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1429-3311192647
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2001 Aug;21(2):101-911457629
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Mar;26(3):425-3611896500
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Jan;47(1):6-221539925
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Feb;56(3):449-6412570966
Cites: Health Educ Q. 1988 Winter;15(4):351-773068205
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Aug;23(2 Suppl):15-2512133734
PubMed ID
16539801 View in PubMed
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914 records – page 1 of 92.