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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Adaptation, dissemination, and evaluation of a cancer palliative care curriculum for the Indian health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97306
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Cheryl Arenella
Bruce Finke
Timothy Domer
Judith S Kaur
Melanie P Merriman
Anita Ousley
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 410/Room 4104, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA. arenellac@mail.nih.gov
Source
J Palliat Care. 2010;26(1):15-21
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
CD-ROM
Curriculum
Education, Professional - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Multimedia
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care
Program Evaluation
United States
Abstract
In 2006, the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) collaborated to develop an interdisciplinary palliative training program for health professionals in the Indian health system. Their goal was to improve clinician knowledge and skills in palliative care, to train future trainers, and to increase access to palliative care for American Indians and Alaska Natives. The combined program of participant self-study utilizing a multimedia CD-ROM and train-the-trainer seminars followed the curriculum entitled Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology (EPEC-O) with American Indian and Alaska Native Cultural Considerations. Three seminars trained 89 interdisciplinary health providers from throughout the Indian health system. Evaluations demonstrated increased clinician self-reported knowledge and confidence to train and high satisfaction with training. Forty-two of 67 participants completed an anonymous post-conference Web questionnaire. Nearly half had conducted or definitively planned palliative education sessions, and 57 percent started new palliative services at their practice sites.
PubMed ID
20402180 View in PubMed
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Addressing suffering through an inter-professional online module: learning with, from, and about each other.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130885
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(3):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Pippa Hall
Lynda Weaver
Timothy G Willett
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. phall@bruyere.org
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(3):244-6
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Distance - methods
Education, Professional - methods
Humans
Internet
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Palliative Care
Pilot Projects
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Telecommunications
PubMed ID
21957803 View in PubMed
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An innovative approach to student internships on American Indian reservations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159301
Source
J Interprof Care. 2008 Jan;22(1):93-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Mary L Amundson
Patricia L Moulton
Sonia S Zimmerman
Beverly J Johnson
Author Affiliation
Center for Rural Health, School of Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, USA. mamundson@medicine.nodak.edu
Source
J Interprof Care. 2008 Jan;22(1):93-101
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency - education
Education, Professional - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medically underserved area
North Dakota
Patient care team
Preceptorship - methods
Rural Health
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
Personnel shortages are evident for a number of disciplines in the health professions, from physicians to nurses. Project CRISTAL (Collaborative Rural Interdisciplinary Service Training and Learning) was designed to immerse students in rural and reservation communities and encourage them to consider practicing in locations that have shortages of health care providers. Students gain an understanding of the importance of working as part of a health care team and address present and future health care workforce shortages. The project was also structured to help students develop the necessary skills to become culturally-sensitive providers. Working relationships among higher education institutions, health care facilities, and reservation communities were enhanced. Additionally, a culturally-appropriate, team-oriented curriculum for reservation settings was developed. Experiences gained from the North Dakota project provide valuable insight into interprofessional health training and health issues of American Indian populations.
PubMed ID
18202989 View in PubMed
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Do indigenous health curricula in health science education reduce disparities in health care outcomes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122885
Source
Med J Aust. 2012 Jul 2;197(1):50-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-2012
Author
Shaun C Ewen
David J Paul
Gina L Bloom
Author Affiliation
Melbourne School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC. shaun.ewen@unimelb.edu.au
Source
Med J Aust. 2012 Jul 2;197(1):50-2
Date
Jul-2-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Dental - methods
Education, Medical - methods
Education, Nursing - methods
Education, Pharmacy - methods
Education, Professional - methods
Health Services, Indigenous
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
To undertake a systematic literature review to determine the scope, rationales, and evaluation foci of indigenous health curricula included in university-based professional training of health care service providers.
Systematic review.
We searched the Australasian Medical Index, ATSIhealth (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Bibliography), CINAHL PLUS, MEDLINE, SCOPUS version 4, and Web of Science databases using relevant keywords. Our initial search identified 1247 articles and our refined search identified 57 articles. Thirty-six articles published between 1999 and 2011 that referred to indigenous health-related curricula within university health science courses were selected for review.
While almost all the articles were explicit that improving indigenous health was an aim of their curriculum, none evaluated the impact of curricula on patient outcomes.
There appears to be a widespread assumption in the literature that improving practitioner skills, knowledge and attitudes will lead to improvements in indigenous health outcomes. The literature showed evidence of efforts towards evaluating learner (student) outcomes, but no evidence of evaluation of patient outcomes. We need to begin to design methods that focus on evaluating the impacts of indigenous health curricula on patient outcomes, while continuing to investigate the impact of curricula on learner outcomes.
PubMed ID
22762233 View in PubMed
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[ETPID educates in organ donation issues. Southern health care region has helped to build program recommended by EU].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139607
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Sep 22-28;107(38):2244-5
Publication Type
Article

From operating theatre to operating studio--visualizing surgery in the age of telemedicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68894
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8(1):56-60; discussion 61-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Margunn Aanestad
Jan Sigurd Røtnes
Bjørn Edwin
Trond Buanes
Author Affiliation
Interventional Centre, Rikshospitalet (National Hospital), Oslo, Norway. margunn@ifi.uio.no
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8(1):56-60; discussion 61-2
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Distance - methods
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods - organization & administration
Education, Professional - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Norway
Surgery - education
Telemedicine - standards
Telemetry - standards
Abstract
We have conducted a telemedicine project between two of Norway's largest hospitals (Rikshospitalet and Ullevål Hospital) with a focus on image-guided surgical and radiological procedures. Video was broadcast using a 34 Mbit/s ATM network. This resulted in changes in the local work practice to accommodate and facilitate the communication. It also required changes to the surgeon's tasks to improve communication with remote viewers. These changes were not trivial and can be viewed as signs of a shift towards a more public kind of surgery and interventional radiology, brought about by new technology.
PubMed ID
11809087 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic and medicosocial problems in the training of pupils at vocational colleges].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150416
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Mar-Apr;(2):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Shubochkina
S S Molchanova
E M Ibragimova
A V Kulikova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Mar-Apr;(2):26-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Education, Professional - methods - standards
Educational Measurement
Humans
Hygiene
Russia
Vocational Education - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors studied the specific features of adaptation in a heterogeneous cohort of pupils (final-year pupils of common, compensating education classes and those of auxiliary schools) to the conditions of varying-level vocational training in building professions. The physiological cost of a learning process, which was associated with the volume and nature of a training load, was shown to be high. The functional capacities of different cohorts of pupils were comparatively assessed on the basis of the common integral index of mental performance, which offered more objective possibilities of hygienically substantiating the volume of an educational load. There was evidence that it was necessary to correct the total educational load in all forms of training, by taking into account a 5-day schooling week, the age of pupils and their capabilities. It was established that there was a need for improving work on pupils' health care, having regard to great differences available in the health status of final-year pupils from different types of educational establishments, contraindications to profession familiarization, the high spread of social and behavioral risk factors, and the influence of schooling and training factors.
PubMed ID
19514282 View in PubMed
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Increasing vaccination rates among health care workers using unit "champions" as a motivator.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147555
Source
Can J Infect Control. 2009;24(3):159-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jason M Slaunwhite
Steven M Smith
Mark T Fleming
Robert Strang
Cathy Lockhart
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Saint Mary's University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. jason.slaunwhite@smu.ca
Source
Can J Infect Control. 2009;24(3):159-64
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Professional - methods
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Units - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Motivation
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Key members (a.k.a. "champions") within specific work units were provided with a brief training session designed to increase awareness of the benefits associated with influenza vaccination. The champions were responsible for encouraging members of their work units to accept an influenza vaccination and in some cases had the requisite training to administer the vaccination on site. Work units were randomly assigned to either champion present or champion absent conditions. Results show increased vaccination compliance for groups where a champion was present (N = 23). An independent sample t-test revealed a significant difference between the two groups t = 2.30, p
PubMed ID
19891169 View in PubMed
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Individual and organizational well-being of female physicians--an assessment of three different management programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76219
Source
MedGenMed. 2004;6(1):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Pia Jansson von Vultée
Runo Axelsson
Bengt Arnetz
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Unit for Social Medicine, and Centre for Environmental Health and Stress Research (CEOS), Uppsala, Sweden. pia.vultee@pubcare.uu.se
Source
MedGenMed. 2004;6(1):4
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Career Mobility
Communication
Comparative Study
Education, Professional - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Leadership
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians, Women - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence - statistics & numerical data
Staff Development - methods - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
Abstract Management programs have become a popular method to develop future leaders. There is, however, a lack of controlled studies assessing the long-term effects of such programs on participants' career development, organizational influence, and mental and physical well-being. The aim of this prospective, controlled study was to assess the possible impact from 3 different structured management development programs on the individual and organizational well-being of female physicians. One year after the end of the 1-year intervention program, the intervention group reported statistically significant improvements in ratings of organizational influence, management feed back, perception of the organizational leadership, contact with one's immediate supervisor, and personal skills development as compared with the reference group. There were no statistically significant differences, however, between the groups with regard to individual health and well-being or career development. These results give rise to many questions, both concerning the effects of these 3 management programs and the career possibilities for female physicians.
PubMed ID
15208517 View in PubMed
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Interprofessional education in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158473
Source
J Interprof Care. 2008 Mar;22(2):205-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Anette Nielsen
Anders Hamming
Author Affiliation
West Jutland University College, Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
J Interprof Care. 2008 Mar;22(2):205-8
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Education, Professional - methods
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Patient care team
Social Work - education
PubMed ID
18320454 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.