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57 records – page 1 of 6.

Andragogy as a didactic perspective in the attitudes of nurse instructors in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225958
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 1991 Aug;11(4):278-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
S. Janhonen
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 1991 Aug;11(4):278-83
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Nursing - organization & administration - standards
Faculty, Nursing - standards
Finland
Humans
Learning
Nursing Education Research
Organizational Objectives
Questionnaires
Role
Abstract
In this article the didactic perspectives of nurse instructors (NIs) is examined with the help of andragogy defined by the concepts of self-directed learning, learning as a process and lifelong learning. The results of a pilot study of ongoing research on the educational perspective of NIs, are used as examples to discuss how far NIs have accepted the features of andragogy as their didactic perspective both in their public stance and in their actions as described by NIs themselves.
PubMed ID
1881376 View in PubMed
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An interprofessional education pilot program in maternity care: findings from an exploratory case study of undergraduate students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127906
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 May;26(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Filomena Meffe
Catherine Claire Moravac
Sherry Espin
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. filomena.meffe@utoronto.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 May;26(3):183-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interdisciplinary Studies
Interprofessional Relations
Learning
Maternal health services
Midwifery - education
Pilot Projects
Abstract
An interprofessional team of maternity care providers and academics developed a pilot interprofessional education (IPE) program in maternity care for undergraduate students in nursing, midwifery and medicine. There are few published studies examining IPE programs in maternity care, particularly at the undergraduate level, that examine long-term outcomes. This paper outlines findings from a case study that explored how participation in an IPE program in maternity care may enhance student knowledge, skills/attitudes, and may promote their collaborative behavior in the practice setting. The program was launched at a Canadian urban teaching hospital and consisted of six workshops and two clinical shadowing experiences. Twenty-five semi-structured, in-depth interviews were completed with nine participants at various time points up to 20 months post-program. Qualitative analysis of transcripts revealed the emergence of four themes: relationship-building, confident communication, willingness to collaborate and woman/family-centered care. Participant statements about their intentions to continue practicing interprofessional collaboration more than a year post-program lend support to its sustained effectiveness. The provision of a safe learning environment, the use of small group learning techniques with mixed teaching strategies, augmented by exposure to an interprofessional faculty, contributed to the program's perceived success.
PubMed ID
22251306 View in PubMed
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Assistant practitioners: lessons learned from licensed practical nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119222
Source
Br J Nurs. 2012 Oct 25-Nov 7;21(19):1160-2, 1164-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Whittingham
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen.
Source
Br J Nurs. 2012 Oct 25-Nov 7;21(19):1160-2, 1164-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Ethics
Great Britain
Humans
Nurse's Role
Nurses - psychology
Nursing, Practical - manpower
Abstract
The role of the assistant practitioner (AP) needs to be defined so they have clear career pathways and opportunities for professional development. The author sought to learn from other countries where a sustained effort had been made to support practitioners fulfilling this intermediate role. The equivalent of an AP in Canada is the licensed practical nurse (LPN); LPNs are subject to clear regulation and practice within their remit of their license. The author travelled to Alberta, Canada, and performed a qualitative study to investigate the role of the LPN. LPNs undertake a 2-year diploma-level course and have the opportunity to enhance their careers through specialist courses or to train as a RN. LPNs benefit from careful regulation, enabling them to have a clear scope of practice, a career structure with opportunities for development and consistent ethical standards. Lessons can be learned from the LPN model and put in practice in the UK; APs need a consistent education programme, a career pathway that promotes development and effective regulation.
PubMed ID
23123896 View in PubMed
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Barriers to and facilitators for implementing quality improvements in palliative care - results from a qualitative interview study in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279978
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2016 Jul 15;15:61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2016
Author
Ragni Sommerbakk
Dagny Faksvåg Haugen
Aksel Tjora
Stein Kaasa
Marianne Jensen Hjermstad
Source
BMC Palliat Care. 2016 Jul 15;15:61
Date
Jul-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration - standards
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Dementia - nursing
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Resources - organization & administration - standards
Healthcare Financing
Hospitalization
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Leadership
Motivation
Neoplasms - nursing
Norway
Nursing Homes - organization & administration - standards
Organizational Culture
Organizational Policy
Palliative Care - organization & administration - standards
Patient compliance
Professional Role
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Implementation of quality improvements in palliative care (PC) is challenging, and detailed knowledge about factors that may facilitate or hinder implementation is essential for success. One part of the EU-funded IMPACT project (IMplementation of quality indicators in PAlliative Care sTudy) aiming to increase the knowledge base, was to conduct national studies in PC services. This study aims to identify factors perceived as barriers or facilitators for improving PC in cancer and dementia settings in Norway.
Individual, dual-participant and focus group interviews were conducted with 20 employees working in different health care services in Norway: two hospitals, one nursing home, and two local medical centers. Thematic analysis with a combined inductive and theoretical approach was applied.
Barriers and facilitators were connected to (1) the innovation (e.g. credibility, advantage, accessibility, attractiveness); (2) the individual professional (e.g. motivation, PC expertise, confidence); (3) the patient (e.g. compliance); (4) the social context (e.g. leadership, culture of change, face-to-face contact); (5) the organizational context (e.g. resources, structures/facilities, expertise); (6) the political and economic context (e.g. policy, legislation, financial arrangements) and (7) the implementation strategy (e.g. educational, meetings, reminders). Four barriers that were particular to PC were identified: the poor general condition of patients in need of PC, symptom assessment tools that were not validated in all patient groups, lack of PC expertise and changes perceived to be at odds with staff's philosophy of care.
When planning an improvement project in PC, services should pay particular attention to factors associated with their chosen implementation strategy. Leaders should also involve staff early in the improvement process, ensure that they have the necessary training in PC and that the change is consistent with the staff's philosophy of care. An important consideration when implementing a symptom assessment tool is whether or not the tool has been validated for the relevant patient group, and to what degree patients need to be involved when using the tool.
PubMed ID
27422410 View in PubMed
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Source
Nurs Times. 1997 May 28-Jun 3;93(22):61-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Valkonen
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City College of Health Care, Finland.
Source
Nurs Times. 1997 May 28-Jun 3;93(22):61-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Finland - ethnology
Great Britain
Humans
International Educational Exchange
Psychiatric Nursing - education
PubMed ID
9205387 View in PubMed
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Building bridges: an interpretive phenomenological analysis of nurse educators' clinical experience using the T.R.U.S.T. Model for inclusive spiritual care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124067
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2012;9:1-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Karen Scott Barss
Author Affiliation
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science & Technology, Canada. karen.barss@siast.sk.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2012;9:1-17
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Holistic Health
Holistic Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Faculty Practice - organization & administration
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Spiritual Therapies - methods
Spirituality
Abstract
Educating nurses to provide evidence-based, non-intrusive spiritual care in today's pluralistic context is both daunting and essential. Qualitative research is needed to investigate what helps nurse educators feel more prepared to meet this challenge. This paper presents findings from an interpretive phenomenological analysis of the experience of nurse educators who used the T.R.U.S.T. Model for Inclusive Spiritual Care in their clinical teaching. The T.R.U.S.T. Model is an evidence-based, non-linear resource developed by the author and piloted in the undergraduate nursing program in which she teaches. Three themes are presented: "The T.R.U.S.T. Model as a bridge to spiritual exploration"; "blockades to the bridge"; and "unblocking the bridge". T.R.U.S.T. was found to have a positive influence on nurse educators' comfort and confidence in the teaching of spiritual care. Recommendations for maximizing the model's positive impact are provided, along with "embodied" resources to support holistic teaching and learning about spiritual care.
PubMed ID
22628352 View in PubMed
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Can action research be applied in developing clinical teaching?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208912
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Apr;25(4):801-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
K. Hyrkäs
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Department of Nursing Science, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Apr;25(4):801-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Nursing Research - methods
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Finland
Humans
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Program Development
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Abstract
Nursing education has undergone significant changes during the last two decades in Finland. However, clinical teaching has remained unchanged even though it forms the most extensive part of nursing education. National and international research results have also exposed several problems for clinical teaching. In the Finnish nursing education system these problems have remained unsolved probably because many of the suggestions for development, based on research results, presuppose changes in both the college and health care systems. The whole system of clinical teaching was changed during the years 1992-1993 in one nursing college and in one hospital in Tampere, Finland. Action research as a research strategy was applied in this study. The purpose of this paper is to describe the solutions sought and to assess if action research can be applied to the development of clinical teaching.
PubMed ID
9104678 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.